J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-22-2018

Conscious Capitalism: How Millennials are Shaping the New Economic Paradigm

In light of the corporate scandals over the past several years, it is refreshing to hear that the new paradigm of conscious capitalism has emerged. Millennials are more health and socially conscious than other generations, meaning that we put a strong emphasis on healthy living and well-being, and our consumer trends reflect this. Conscious capitalism refers to businesses that serve the interests of all major stakeholders-customers, employees, investors, communities, suppliers, and the environment. Data compiled over the last several years indicates that the world’s economic paradigm is shifting as consumers are starting to favor conscious-minded business. According to the 2012 Edelman Good Purpose Survey, 47% of consumers buy at least one brand that supports a good cause every month, an almost a 50% increase between 2010 and 2012! The most frequent purchasers of socially conscious brands were Millennials, Gen-X’ers, people employed at management positions and above, married people, and moms. Given the significant rise in socially conscious spending practices between 2010 and 2012, one can only imagine what the data might look like for 2014! Conscious companies have seen unprecedented success in the last decade. Marketing professor Raj Sisodia reports that conscious brands’ investment returns are 1025% over the past ten years, compared to only 122% for the S&P 500 and 316% for companies selected purely on their ability to deliver superior returns to investors. Forbes cites the interesting dichotomy between Target and Walmart, two huge corporations who seemingly do the same thing, but have very different levels of conscious capitalism. Overall, the re-imagination of capitalism as a conscious phenomenon is indicative of a shifting paradigm we are seeing across our world, where Millennial consumers are taking responsibility for using their dollars to improve our planet and promote progress and change. After only a few generations of conscious spending and sustainable business practices, the association between capitalism and crony greed could become a distant memory. If you own a business and you would like to make it more conscious, or if you are thinking about starting a conscious business, check out marketing professor Raj Sisodia’s six tips for conscious success.

Keywords: [“conscious”,”company”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://themindunleashed.com/2014/09/millennials-shaping-new…

Online Library of Liberty

The doctrine of man held in general in nineteenth-century America argued that each man was ultimately responsible for what happened to him, for his own salvation, both in the here and now and in the hereafter. Thus, whether a man prospered or failed in economic life was each man’s individual responsibility: each man had a right to the rewards for success and, in the same sense, deserved the punishment that came with failure. The New Jerusalem is never going to be realized here on earth, and the man who insists that it is, is always lost unto freedom. Conclusion: Each man should be free to take whatever action he wishes in his economic behavior, so long as he does not use force or fraud against another. The modern liberal is usually inconsistent in that he defends man’s noneconomic freedoms, but is often quite indifferent to his economic freedom. The modern conservative is often inconsistent in that he defends man’s economic freedom but is indifferent to his noneconomic freedoms. Far better to build our economic system on largely impersonal relationships and on man’s self-interest-a motive power with which he is generously supplied. One need only study the history of such utopian experiments as our Indiana’s Harmony and New Harmony to realize that a social structure which ignores man’s essential nature results in the dissension, conflict, disintegration, and dissolution of Robert Owen’s New Harmony or the absolutism of Father Rapp’s Harmony. Under economic freedom, only man’s destructive instincts are curbed by law. As a stubborn act of faith I insist that precisely what makes man man is his potential ability to conquer both himself and his environment. The face of man shall wisdom learn, And error cease to reign: The charms of innocence return, And all be new again. In my view, New Harmony should be seen, not as a monument to man’s idealism, but as a testament to man’s capacity to delude himself about his real nature.

Keywords: [“man”,”Freedom”,”New”]
Source: http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/rogge-can-capitalism-survive

Where W. Got Compassion

In July, Bush vowed, in his first major policy speech as a candidate, to ”rally the armies of compassion in our communities to fight a very different war against poverty” – one based on religious and community groups like New Start – and afterward he paused to thank Olasky. Now, in the car, Olasky describes all the things that Cantu will have to do when he enrolls in New Start – everything from attending Bible study and meeting with a church mentor – that are central to what Olasky and Bush have called ”the transforming power of faith. Initially, he found it where all the Olaskys had – in the Torah. While Bush drank to excess and purportedly participated in branding rituals with his fraternity brothers, Olasky grew his sideburns long and read Marx and Lenin. ” In 1992, Olasky finally published his findings in ”The Tragedy of American Compassion. Almost all of the proposals, which were sponsored by Senator Dan Coats of Indiana and had names like the Character Development Act, were killed before they even reached the floor – largely at the hands of the same Republicans who had wrapped themselves only months earlier in Olasky’s language of compassion. Dejected and dispirited, Olasky returned to Austin, where he, like Charles Brace in the 1800’s, waged his solitary crusade. In 1993, Olasky got a phone message from George W. Bush asking to meet. While Bush had drunk too heavily in the 1980’s, Olasky had divorced his first wife – an act that contrasted markedly with his later Christian writings about family values. After an hourlong meeting with Bush, Olasky was sure he had found a new messenger for his ideas. Even Bush’s aides take pains to distance their candidate from Olasky’s proselytizing. If religion is the most provocative element of Bush’s vision, critics say its bigger challenge is more worldly: there simply aren’t enough Marvin Olaskys out there to replace Uncle Sam.

Keywords: [“Olasky”,”Bush”,”program”]
Source: http://www.nytimes.com/1999/09/12/magazine/where-w-got-compassion.html

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