J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-30-2018

Compassionate Capitalist – When Angel Investors are “Takers”

What Kind of Capitalism Should India Have?

Though the term ‘compassionate capitalism’ has been a part of public discourse outside India for some years now, the current spotlight on it in India is largely due to N.R. Narayana Murthy, the co-founder of Infosys. His most recent reference to it was occasioned by the hike in former CEO Vishal Sikka’s salary, which made it 935 times the median pay at Infosys last fiscal; the extraordinary severance compensation paid to Rajiv Bansal, former Infosys CFO, on his exit from the company and a pay hike of 35% to COO Pravin Rao. Describing his philosophy of compassionate capitalism, Murthy said it was capitalism in mind and socialism at heart, a creed which looks at fairness and at ensuring that everyone is better off. In FY16, at least 27 directors earned at least 100 times more than an average employee, whereas under a saner capitalism the ratio between highest compensation in the firm and the median salary should ideally be 50-60. 

Compassionate capitalism as a term became a part of public discourse globally largely after the economic crisis of 2008 and Thomas Piketty’s seminal publication, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, which highlighted the growing disparity between the haves and the have nots of this world, and movements like Occupy Wall Street. Picketty confirmed that though capitalism is central to the innovation and entrepreneurial risk-taking needed for economic growth, inequality does not naturally or automatically decline under capitalism and that capitalist growth leads to greater inequality because of the higher rate of return on capital compared with the low overall growth rate of the economy, or to put it another way, income from investments rises faster than wages. Several economists like William Easterly, professor of economics at New York University and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, have argued in favour of traditional capitalism because it helps the poor; others believe that insisting on greater equality will distract businesses from their primary goal of making profits. In the UK, 10% of profits were returned to shareholders in 1970; this figure is now 70%. In India, the figure is lower but is growing rapidly, and for many corporations it is now higher than 50%. 

Since a majority of shareholders are among the richest in society, the benefit goes largely to the rich, increasing inequality. According to recent research by Forbes and the International Monetary Fund, the wealth of 101 Indian billionaires equals 13% of country’s GDP. Every dollar of profit given to the shareholders of corporations is a dollar that could have been spent paying producers or workers more, paying more tax, or investing in infrastructure or innovation. A laissez faire capitalism which embodies an ‘I am alright Jack, and the devil take the hindmost’ attitude will no longer do. Apart from communism, reform advocacy has ranged from welfare capitalism to Gandhi’s theories of decentralised production by small individual owner producers, along with trusteeship of the wealthy; corporate and individual philanthropy; mandatory corporate social responsibility contributions from companies, to variations of compassionate capitalism such as ‘inclusive capitalism’, the ‘humane capitalism’ of Muhammad Yunus and the ‘creative capitalism’ of Bill Gates. 

Compassionate capitalism must also emphasise conscious reciprocity, a concept which implies that the giver gets as much as the receiver. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”company”,”profit”]
Source: https://thewire.in/economy/capitalism-inequality-india

Compassionate Capitalism

God is good to bring us on a journey that includes friends that become like family along the way. In our quest to bring hope and help to America’s Gold Star families, there have been a few individuals that have also brought their businesses along for the ride. We met Chris Gannon because the Rebacks love fried chicken. At the time, Chris was managing a local PDQ franchise that his family owned. His family is of Outback Steakhouse, Carraba’s, Bonefish Grill, and PDQ fame. 

Chris is one of the first people I called when I had this crazy idea of intersecting civilians and Gold Star families, and he jumped in with both feet. Chris and Tim Gannon have given us food for nearly every event, opened their homes, brought other corporations on board, and been more than just a promoter of Believe With methey have swung hammers and given of their talent, their time and effort as well. They have been eager to give back to America’s Gold Star families knowing that their success is because of the sacrifices of those who serve in our military. Chris leaves it on his mantle year round as a reminder that there are families all across this nation that have given their sons and daughters for our every freedom and opportunity. His understanding of serving and giving has been shaped by intersecting with our Gold Star familiesand our capacity to give back to those who have paid for our freedoms with their loved ones has been multiplied because of families like the Gannons. 

So if you love our Gold Star families, then feel good about giving your hard earned money to restauranteurs like the Gannons. Have a bloomin’ onion and know that every time you do, you’re helping us give back to those who have given us their ALL. Consider Sharing to Support Gold Star Families. 

Keywords: [“family”,”Star”,”Gold”]
Source: https://believewithme.com/2017/04/24/compassionate-capitalism/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-29-2018

A physician suicide: covered up with a tarp and silence

Another young doctor recently jumped to her death in New York City. Hello Pamela, I am not a doctor, but a mother of 3 and a wife of a resident physician. Two doctors died from jumping off our 33-story building in 2 years, and no one seems to care. Since I’m not a doctor, there’s only so much I can understand about what my husband is going through. This is what I saw when I came home tonight – a dead doctor lying under that tarp – lifeless in the freezing cold. 

Another doctor dead from Mt. Sinai in NY. I think NY is a horrible place to work. Conditions are deplorable for doctors, and you should investigate. Don’t let another doctor’s life go unspoken for. 

A few hours before this flurry of emails, I was on the phone with a doctor who reported that her own family physician shot herself in her clinic. Now to answer the questions posed to me by the doctor’s wife, the physician, and the hospital executive. More than one million Americans lose their doctors to suicide each year. Now is the time for fearless leadership, for the heroes among us to reveal themselves and take a stand for our doctors – for the men and women who walk into our hospitals everyday to so selflessly serve others. 

Keywords: [“doctor”,”hospital”,”suicide”]
Source: https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2018/01/physician-suicide-covered…

Vulture Capitalism, by John Stossel

Shifting resources does mean some people lose their jobs. Intuition tells us that it would be better if no one ever lost a job and that capitalists who close businesses are evil. America is richer today because those workers lost their jobs, because money once paid them is put to better use. Most of those workers found new jobs where their skills better served consumers. We take pictures as they leave their jobs on that last day when the factory closes. 

We don’t see the better things that are done with capital that once went into the factory. We had no clue that those companies were about to produce cool new things, thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in value. If government does not bestow privileges, those that don’t create wealth go out of business, and those that fund good ideas grow. Handouts to Solyndra and special deals for Goldman Sachs and GM are not capitalism. Many people hate banks, private-equity firms and mortgage brokers. 

The real evil bankers are the government cronies, like those at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In a real free market – no government privileges or barriers to competition – capitalism is great. 

Keywords: [“job”,”better”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://www.creators.com/read/john-stossel/03/12/vulture-capitalism

RevThinking with Joel Pilger and Tim Thompson

Episode Info: This podcast is part one of a conversation with David Meltzer, Co-Founder and CEO at Sports1Marketing. David is an executive, author, and humanitarian best known for his work in the field of sports marketing. He is a featured speaker at conferences, corporate meetings, seminars, and other events along with being featured in The New York Times, Sporting News, Fox Business, and Bloomberg. At Terranea Resort in Los Angeles, RevThink’s Tim Thompson and Joel Pilger lead a Creative Entrepreneurs conference on BULLETPROOFING PROFITS. Knowing that being our topic, we recognized our audience might show up thinking we were going to talk only about money. 

Much to everyone’s surprise, we revealed that profits in a creative firm are not about money, but rather about CHOICES and maintaining CONTROL of your business. In David’s talk, he provided us with break from all the talk of numbers plus a terrific dose of inspiration. David’s podcast can be found here: https://itunes. 

Keywords: [“David”,”talk”,”featured”]
Source: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/joel-pilger/revthinking/e/52475275

Photon by HTML5 UP

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Blandit adipiscing eu felis iaculis volutpat ac adipiscing accumsan eu faucibus. Integer ac pellentesque praesent tincidunt felis sagittis eget. 

Keywords: [“adipiscing”,”felis”,”accumsan”]
Source: http://www.paisleyparksofhouston.com/compassionate_capitalism_english…

LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner on management

Justin Sullivan/Getty Since becoming CEO in 2009, Jeff Weiner has led LinkedIn to become a network of 364 million registered users with offices in 30 countries and a market cap of $26 billion. Weiner’s leadership style has earned him the trust of founder and chairman Reid Hoffman, his team, and LinkedIn investors. He used the example of a manager sitting down with an employee who’s frazzled. Before getting to this point, Weiner said, it’s necessary to take a moment to try to understand where the employee is coming from. It could be driven by something happening in their personal life or a misunderstanding of what’s required of them. 

That’s why it’s important to provide room for external factors that may be influencing them, and then have a discussion about the root of the problem. 

Keywords: [“become”,”where”,”Weiner”]
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/linkedin-ceo-jeff-weiner-on-management-2015-7

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-28-2018

The greatest MLK speeches you never heard

King may be a national hero whose birthday the country commemorates on Monday, but to many he remains a one-dimensional hero – the vast body of his work unknown. That’s the question CNN put to some members of King’s inner circle as well as top King scholars. We asked them to pick their favorite overlooked gems from King, any extraordinary spoken or written words people don’t typically hear during King commemorations. King put principle over personal popularity and continued to oppose the war. Why it’s important: It is one of King’s most electrifying speeches. 

Sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta on July 4, 1965.Why it’s important: We’ve heard about King’s dream. With the rise of the Black Power movement, King seemed dull and obsolete to many youths in the late 1960s who preferred the fire of Malcolm X and the Black Panthers. King is holding a meeting of top staffers in 1963 just before they initiate a campaign in Birmingham. Written on July 18, 1952, to his future wife, Coretta Scott, in which King revealed some surprising thoughts on capitalism and communism. Why it’s important: There’s a theory that King adopted more radical economic theories in the last three years of his life. 

King’s 1952 letter reveals he was radical far earlier than most people realize. King’s fifth book was published in 1967.Why it’s important: This is King’s last – and most radical – book. 

Keywords: [“King”,”white”,”rights”]
Source: https://www.cnn.com/2014/01/19/us/king-speeches-never-heard

Compassion and Capitalism – The Best You Magazine

David Meltzer was born in Akron, Ohio In 1968 and was described as a bright and able student at school. Upon graduating, he entered the world of business, where he was soon part of the upper echelon of the business community. Everywhere he worked in the world of business, Meltzer appeared to have the Midas touch. In his 30s, already a multi-millionaire, Meltzer’s career went off the rails. Meltzer decided he needed to stop and look at how he’d previously created success. 

Meltzer explored spirituality, bringing a broader more balanced approach to his business life. Through this process, he worked out four principles that would become his guiding light in all his future business interactions. Meltzer soon rose to great business and personal success. It is this willingness to trust in what the universe is doing that defines Meltzer’s approach to life. It fit perfectly with the notion of gratitude, one of his own core beliefs in the philosophy of business. 

Whether it’s the elementary school, high school, college or law school he attended, he says Meltzer enjoys sharing the lessons he’s learned to empower young people who may be in a similar situation. His second book, Compassionate Capitalism: AJourney to the Soul of Business, was published In 2016 and is co-authored with Blaine Bartlett. 

Keywords: [“Meltzer”,”business”,”works”]
Source: http://thebestyoumagazine.co/compassion-and-capitalism

Christian Research Institute

In response to the critics of capitalism, many conservative Christians turn to philosopher Ayn Rand for ammunition. Finally, Smith argued that capitalism channels greed, which is a good thing. Others, including many Christians, want to defend capitalism, but end up drawing on the work of philosopher and playwright Ayn Rand, who called greed a virtue. THE BEEHIVE. Rand wasn’t the first one to identify capitalism with greed. 

THEN COMES RAND. Perhaps more than anyone else, Ayn Rand not only identified capitalism with greed, but defended it in those terms. We don’t need Rand’s philosophy to defend capitalism. FALLING INTO CAPITALISM. So, contrary to Rand, capitalism doesn’t need greed. 18 Capitalism is just greed elevated to economics, or so they think. 

To be sure, Rand and other champions of capitalism appeal to greed, even glory in it. That’s why greed can explain why capitalism works no better than it can explain the universal thirst for, say, well-synchronized traffic lights: greed is universal. Once we comprehend the nature of entrepreneurial capitalism, we see that it has fit within the Christian worldview all along. Jay W. Richards is the author of Money, Greed, and God: Why Capitalism Is the Solution and Not the Problem. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”greed”,”Rand”]
Source: http://www.equip.org/article/was-ayn-rand-right

Capitalism VS Human Compassion

Capitalism can survive as long as there is no greed. Almost daily we read about some bank, investment broker or some con-artist scamming people out of millions of dollars. We expect banks to raise fees, we expect to lose money in our 401k, we expect to pay high interest rates on credit cards,,,,. The companies were more interested in protecting their money, then the health and safety of the employees. Look at all of the people that were conned into signing flexible mortgage rates. 

Get the people to sign the flexible mortgage, then hike the rates up so high the family can not pay, the bank gets the home, rinse, repeat,,,,. I think capitalism can work, but not while unbridled greed is involved. The US government established free trade with China, now we get to reap higher taxes to pay for more people on welfare. I feel there is a line in the sand that capitalism should not cross. Just because someone has the right to make money, does not give them the right to exploit others. 

Company ABC makes widgets; highest paid employee makes $30 million a year, the lowest paid sub-contractor of a sub-contractor should make $1 million a year, give or take a few bucks. Post your comments in this forum thread about Human Compassion VS Capitalism. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”people”,”company”]
Source: http://www.survivalboards.com/2012-03-10/capitalism-vs-human-compassion

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-27-2018

The United Airlines Debacle and the Morality of Capitalism

The video of the United Airlines passenger who was recently dragged out of his seat screaming from an overbooked flight was seen around the world. The debate has centered around the practice of overbooking seats in the industry and the legal responses of airlines. Here is why United Airlines kicking off and countenancing the assault of a paying customer is a big deal: It helps to reveal how corporate America often puts rules before people and how capitalism often places profits before human dignity. Overbooking is a device that most airlines use to maximize their profits. A customer’s inconvenience is subordinated to profits. 

This is because the goal of the corporation is not to reduce the price of tickets and provide savings for customers, but to maximize profits for shareholders. If corporate rules and the laws of capitalism lead to this, then they are unjust rules and laws. Those rules said this: First, we may sometimes overbook because we want to maximize our profits. The same economic calculus that says profits are the most important metric in decision-making leads to victims being dragged along the floor of an airplane and eking out an existence on the floor of a hovel in the slums of Nairobi. The privileging of profits over people leads to unjust wages, poor working conditions, the degradation of the environment and assaults on human dignity. 

As long as profits are seen to be the only measure of success, employees will subordinate everything – including compassion – to that goal. Some companies and managers may be too blinded by the pursuit of profit to behave compassionately. 

Keywords: [“profit”,”employee”,”airline”]
Source: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/the-united-airlines-debacle…

The rise of state capitalism

These are all monuments to the rise of a new kind of hybrid corporation, backed by the state but behaving like a private-sector multinational. State-directed capitalism is not a new idea: witness the East India Company. In 2009 China Mobile and another state giant, China National Petroleum Corporation, made profits of $33 billion-more than China’s 500 most profitable private companies combined. State giants soak up capital and talent that might have been used better by private companies. State companies are good at copying others, partly because they can use the government’s clout to get hold of their technology; but as they have to produce ideas of their own they will become less competitive. 

State capitalism works well only when directed by a competent state. Everywhere state capitalism favours well-connected insiders over innovative outsiders. Thus the model produces cronyism, inequality and eventually discontent-as the Mubaraks’ brand of state capitalism did in Egypt. Rising powers have always used the state to kick-start growth: think of Japan and South Korea in the 1950s or Germany in the 1870s or even the United States after the war of independence. For emerging countries wanting to make their mark on the world, state capitalism has an obvious appeal. 

Both for their own sake, and in the interests of world trade, the practitioners of state capitalism need to start unwinding their huge holdings in favoured companies and handing them over to private investors. If these companies are as good as they boast they are, then they no longer need the crutch of state support. 

Keywords: [“company”,”state”,”government”]
Source: https://www.economist.com/node/21543160

The Pope and Poverty

Pope Francis has come to the United States, bringing with him more criticism of capitalism than a Bernie Sanders rally. The pope’s emphasis on the needs of the poor is important, especially in today’s politics, where poverty is often a public-policy sideline. In calling attention to the problem, he fails to understand that free-market capitalism is not a cause of poverty, but a solution. In 1980, less than 1 percent of Argentinians lived in extreme poverty, while in neighboring Chile, the extreme-poverty rate exceeded 15 percent. Today, while the proportion of Argentinians living in extreme poverty has risen slightly, to nearly 3 percent, Chile has seen the most dramatic reduction in poverty in Latin America. 

Fewer than 2 percent of Chileans now live in extreme poverty. The reality is that free-market capitalism has done more to help the poor than any other force in history. Consider that in the last 20 years, as much of the world has embraced free markets, more than a billion people have been lifted out of poverty, while the number of people worldwide living on less than $2 per day has been cut in half. In China alone, even the partial adoption of a market-oriented economy has saved more than 650 million people from poverty. Almost 84 percent of Chinese lived in extreme poverty in 1987. 

Throughout most of human history, most of mankind lived in truly abject poverty. Given the remarkable compassion that this pope has shown on so many subjects, it would be a bitter irony indeed if his ill-informed critique of capitalism condemned more people to a life of poverty. 

Keywords: [“poverty”,”capitalism”,”percent”]
Source: https://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/pope-poverty

Mass shootings and the moral hazard of capitalism – People’s World

A body is covered with a sheet after the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Sunday, Oct. 1. To the injured, we send our best wishes for a quick recovery. To deliberately take, or attempt to take, a human life is a grievous thing. Once again, with our hands raised in mourning and our heads bowed in grief and introspection, we ask how and why such a thing can happen. To answer that question, we do not need to know what particular loathsome whispers and poisonous thoughts introduced finger to trigger, and bullets to innocent flesh. 

It is enough to look ourselves, and our society, squarely in the face. It happens because we learn more from bad examples than from good advice, and because we live in a society where life is cheaply held. Only this: that under capitalism, the decision to protect life or take it, to inflict suffering or to relieve it, is an individual decision about the use of property, to be made without the interference of the state. In the law, the concept of ‘moral hazard’ designates the danger of bad examples, the idea that allowing someone to get away with something sets a precedent for harmful behavior. The epidemic of mass shootings is evidence that we have disregarded the moral hazard of capitalism. 

We have rubbed for so long against this perverse and inhuman system that the distinction between citizen and executioner, between order and violence, has been worn away. Teaching love, and tolerance, and respect is good. 

Keywords: [“right”,”life”,”shoot”]
Source: http://www.peoplesworld.org/article/mass-shootings-and-the-moral-hazard…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-26-2018

The New Nonprofit Paradigm: Fusing Compassion with Capitalism – Ventureneer

His for-profit company, Pallotta Team Works, invented two high-profile events: the AIDSRides and Breast Cancer 3-Days, raising over a half billion dollars and netting $305 million in eight years. Pallotta doesn’t come close to suggesting ways to improve performance within the existing nonprofit paradigm. Rather, he argues that the paradigm itself is the problem, and calls into question our fundamental canons about charity. His thesis: society’s nonprofit ethic undermines our ability to eradicate great problems and puts charities at a severe disadvantage to the for-profit sector at every level. Compensation: We allow the for-profit sector to pay people millions, but don’t want anyone paid a high salary in charity. 

That means charities can’t set aside funds to develop long-term solutions. Learning: We aren’t upset when Paramount makes a $200 million movie that fails, but if a charity experiments with a bold new fundraising initiative that disappoints, we want heads to roll. So charities are petrified – too scared to try any new endeavors and unable to benefit from the valuable learning curve that comes with exploration and innovation. Capital: We let for-profit companies raise massive capital in the stock market by offering investment returns, but we forbid the payment of a financial return to charity. The for-profit sector monopolizes the capital markets while charities are left to beg for donations. 

Another critical area where charities must compete is in the acquisition and retention of dynamic, dedicated leadership. As long as Americans see charity as a field in which people must suffer in the name of doing good, says Pallotta, we are preventing much good from being done. 

Keywords: [“charity”,”for-profit”,”nonprofit”]
Source: http://ventureneer.com/the-new-nonprofit-paradigm-fusing-compassion-with…

How to end crony capitalism

The quicker Republicans get this done, and without hearings, the less likely will the rest of the country discover how much it will cost in foregone Medicaid and Medicare or ballooning budget deficits. Donald Trump has been trashing democratic institutions – the independence of the press, judges who disagree with him, uncooperative legislators – while raking in money off his presidency. Don’t lose sight of the larger attack on our democracy that was underway even before Trump was elected: A flood of big money into politics. Lest you conclude it’s only Republicans who have been pocketing big bucks in exchange for political favors, consider what Big Tech – the industry that’s mostly bankrolled Democrats – is up to. Never underestimate the power of big money, whichever side of the aisle it’s aimed at. 

Big money is buying giant tax cuts, allowing Russia to interfere in future elections, and killing Americans. Republicans may be taking more big money, but both parties have been raking it in. A number of Trump voters told me they voted for him because they wanted someone who’d shake up Washington, drain the swamp, and get rid of crony capitalism. They’re decent folks who just want a government that’s not of, by, and for the moneyed interests. The big money that’s taken over American politics in recent years has created the biggest political backlash in postwar American history – inside both parties. 

It’s splitting the Republican Party between its large corporate patrons and a base that detests big corporations and Wall Street. When it comes to getting big money out of politics and ending crony capitalism, there’s no right or left, and certainly no middle. 

Keywords: [“big”,”money”,”Republican”]
Source: https://www.nationofchange.org/2017/10/23/end-crony-capitalism

The American Conservative

Despite his myriad failings as a president, Bush had a human decency, and an inspiring vision of America, that is painfully lacking in our politics today. Maybe it’s just that I grew up with Bush-he was president from the time I was 8 to the time I was 16-but there’s something comforting and almost endearing about our 43rd president’s political style. There is a hardness in our discourse today, in politics and in culture, that did not exist 16 years ago, or even eight. Perhaps Hillary Clinton retained some of this folksy style, but style it was; her policies were bland technocracy mixed with social liberalism, a mix that gratified elites but did not particularly resonate with the American people. To speak on its convention stage can no longer claim to be the party of the average American. 

Despite all of this, there is a window for healing and uniting the country-in Trumpism’s core ideas. Stripped of Trump’s brand of aggressive demagoguery, these ideas might even be largely uncontroversial. Far from somehow being at odds, the aspirational, folksy style of George W. Bush and the core ideas of Trumpism go hand in hand: while America should not be encased in amber, its longstanding, praiseworthy traditions and ways of life should not be sledgehammered merely to make way for globalized creative destruction. The core challenge for conservatives now is to implement the best of Trump’s ideas while disavowing the worst of his political style. 

Bush doesn’t hold a copyright on that turn of phrase. What American politics needs is compassionate Trumpism. Addison Del Mastro is an editorial assistant at The American Conservative. 

Keywords: [“Bush”,”America”,”style”]
Source: http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/compassionate-trumpism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-25-2018

Anti-Capitalism in Five Minutes

Arguing against capitalism, we’re told, is simply crazy. We are told, over and over, that capitalism is not just the system we have, but the only system we can ever have. We should be searching for ways to explain to co-workers in water-cooler conversations – radical politics in five minutes or less – why we must abandon predatory corporate capitalism. Capitalism is admittedly an incredibly productive system that has created a flood of goods unlike anything the world has ever seen. Capitalism has given those of us in the First World lots of stuff in exchange for our souls, our hope for progressive politics, and the possibility of a decent future for children. 

If we understand democracy as a system that gives ordinary people a meaningful way to participate in the formation of public policy, rather than just a role in ratifying decisions made by the powerful, then it’s clear that capitalism and democracy are mutually exclusive. Capitalism is a system based on the idea of unlimited growth. Capitalism is not, of course, the only unsustainable system that humans have devised, but it is the most obviously unsustainable system, and it’s the one in which we are stuck. If there is no alternative, anyone who questions capitalism is crazy. Remember TINA: There is no alternative to predatory corporate capitalism. 

To be realistic we are told we must capitulate to a system that steals our souls, enslaves us to concentrated power, and will someday destroy the planet. What is truly crazy is falling for the con that an inhuman, anti-democratic, and unsustainable system – one that leaves half the world’s people in abject poverty – is all that there is, all that there ever can be, all that there ever will be. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”system”,”such”]
Source: https://www.counterpunch.org/…/04/30/anti-capitalism-in-five-minutes

List of political ideologies

In social studies, a political ideology is a certain set of ethical ideals, principles, doctrines, myths or symbols of a social movement, institution, class or large group that explains how society should work and offers some political and cultural blueprint for a certain social order. A political ideology largely concerns itself with how to allocate power and to what ends it should be used. Some political parties follow a certain ideology very closely while others may take broad inspiration from a group of related ideologies without specifically embracing any one of them. Typically, each ideology contains certain ideas on what it considers to be the best form of government and the best economic system. Ideologies tend to identify themselves by their position on the political spectrum, though this is very often controversial. 

Finally, ideologies can be distinguished from political strategies and from single issues that a party may be built around. There are several studies that show that political ideology is heritable within families. The following list is strictly alphabetical and attempts to divide the ideologies found in practical political life into a number of groups and each group contains ideologies that are related to each other. The headers refer to names of the best-known ideologies in each group. They are merely noting that the ideologies in question are practically, historically and ideologically related to each other. 

One ideology can belong to several groups and there is sometimes considerable overlap between related ideologies. A b Ecofascism was the Ideology of the minor parties: The Greens of Austria, Green Party of Hungary and the Liberal Ecologist Party in Switzerland. 

Keywords: [“ideology”,”political”,”group”]
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_ideologies

A Universal Basic Income is capitulation to capitalism

A UBI works as an unconditional payment for all working adults, regardless of age, ability, gender, skills or employment status, so that they can continue to consume even while jobs disappear. While sovereign governments can certainly afford a UBI, simply throwing money at a problem, instead of addressing its root cause presents serious concerns. Second, a UBI is designed to work as a partial or complete substitute for existing welfare and social security programs. Former tech executive, and Presidential candidate, Andrew Yang told the New York times that a UBI is necessary for capitalism to continue. A UBI is a smokescreen for the destruction of the social safety net. 

The godfather of neoliberalism himself, Milton Friedman, argued in his book Capitalism and Freedom that a UBI is an efficient way to eliminate and privatise public sector programs including welfare, social security, the minimum wage, public health, housing, hospitals, pensions and aged-care. A UBI has the potential to further drive down wages. Some advocates claim a UBI empowers workers to reject jobs with insufficient compensation. To the contrary, a UBI that covers the cost of living creates zero incentive for employers to provide wages that do the same and encourages the continuation of outsourcing. A UBI is expensive & barely makes a dent in working-age poverty. 

Experts have predicted a UBI could cost anywhere between 6.5%, to 35% of GDP, but barely makes a dent in working-aged poverty which would decline by less than 2%, according to a report by Compass, by less than 1% for pensioners. Though child poverty could decline from 16-9%, a UBI still doesn’t deliver the necessary bang for the government’s buck. 

Keywords: [“UBI”,”work”,”job”]
Source: https://renegadeinc.com/universal-basic-income-capitulation-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-24-2018

LSE Business Review – Compassionate capitalism: Lessons from medieval Cambridge

Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England when burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today! Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hot-spots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the Hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the Hospital. 

Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Compassionate capitalism involved high levels of charitable giving to hospitals, monasteries, churches and colleges which helped disseminate the economic benefits of the ‘winners’ of the commercial revolution. The post gives the views of its authors, not the position of LSE Business Review or the London School of Economics. 

She is a medieval historian by training and her publications include a co-authored book with Mark Casson on The Entrepreneur in History: From Medieval Merchant to Modern Business Leader – Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan – and articles in Urban History, Business History and the Economic History Review. John Lee is a Research Associate at the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of York. Katie Phillips is an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded PhD student in Medieval Studies at the University of Reading. 

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/businessreview/2017/06/05/compassionate-capitalism…

Capitalism, Corporatism, Free Markets

At some point, a collective decision was made that the unions should be given such expanded powers that they could destroy the company if they wanted. The union doesn’t profit from increasing profits and building a healthy company, it profits from building an overstaffed company that exists to benefit its employees. The union would have been better served if it divvied up the right to collect a union payout from GM among the workers of the time and let them sell the claims. What would have been much more honest and worked better would have been outright nationalization of GM when the rules were set up that the UAW could destroy the company. The toxin in this case may be a lot of things but it is an abomination to a free market, and it has destroyed the American auto industry. 

Far from vanishing, many of GM’s assets would be quickly purchased by competent foreign automakers eager to expand their capacity in what is the world’s largest auto market. Happily, the list of well-run car companies, from Toyota to Nissan to Porsche, is long. If GM is going to get federal money, it should go toward buyouts of long-term employees, and then let the market work to redeploy its assets toward more useful purposes than maintaining an expensive company-town welfare state, that makes cars on the side. Matt Welch says to the barricades to defend free markets. As Jonah says, markets are more than this information delivery system. 

Liberty demands property rights which demand free markets. In the fifties he tried door-to-door in Lansing after moving to Michigan with his upper Midwest bride, but when he got an offer at A.C. Spark Plug in her home town he took it, and settled into a middle-class lifestyle, during the best years of the company, in which he raised his family. 

Keywords: [“company”,”market”,”right”]
Source: http://www.transterrestrial.com/archives/2008/11/capitalism_corp.html

Get Ready: Pope’s Arrival Will Commence a Week of Trashing Capitalism

RUSH: The pope, Pope Francis, took off from Cuba within the last, what was it, half hour. What’s really remarkable is that Obama and Moochelle are going to be there to greet the pope as he descends the stairs. Thomas Sowell has a column today about the pope and his arrival, but primary it’s about the pope’s message. Of course the pope believes that we’ve all done a rotten, horrible job of it, and that governments need to get bigger and they need to become populated with more and more compassionate people to find ways to get rid of poverty. The message of this pope and every other leftist in the world is that prosperity is causing poverty. 

That’s why we need a great compassionate person like Obama or the pope to make sure that the pieces of the pie are not extraordinarily large for the undeserving and microscopically small for the truly deserving. He does not hold a single belief when it comes to such things as contraception, abortion, you name it, with the Catholic Church or with the pope. We’ve already read that Obama plans to hide the advancement of his agenda behind the pope. In the process make it look like this pope is abandoning his own church in favor of the liberal church. If the pope comes along and all of a sudden supports amnesty, which the pope is going to do. 

I’ll just tell you, I read that the church needs – it might have been the Washington Post or it might have been the New York Times, I forget the news publication it was, but it said that the church, the pope is interested in immigration and amnesty and immigrants because they need to fill the pews, just like the Democrats need voters. The reason the Catholic Church, the pope is supporting our amnesty, immigration, is a desire to restock, if you will, the pews. 

Keywords: [“pope”,”That's”,”Church”]
Source: https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2015/09/22/get_ready_pope_s…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-23-2018

The Library To The World

Download. Download Survival Guide For The Modern World: How to Stay Alive, Survive and Thrive in Uncertain Times ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. We offer you Survival Guide For The Modern World: How to Stay Alive, Survive and Thrive in Uncertain Times premium access, just enter your keyword and download the pdf. Download. Download Russian Criminal Tattoo Encyclopaedia Volume I ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. 

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Keywords: [“download”,”pdf”,”ready”]
Source: http://www.nasernobari.com/compassionate-capitalism-a-journey-to-the-soul…

Capitalism With a Heart

They justify corporate philanthropy, like donating to the United Way, not because it’s virtuous but because it buys public good will and thus contributes to the company’s bottom line. To hard-core free-marketeers, the corporation’s only mission is to generate profits for shareholders. Mackey defines his company’s mission as improving the health and well-being of everyone on the planet. Before taking the company public, he told investors that he was going to devote 5 percent of the profits to philanthropy, so they can’t complain now that he’s robbing them. Nor can Google’s shareholders, because its founders also warned investors of their philanthropic plans. 

As Katie Hafner reported in The Times, they’ve given $1 billion in seed money to Google.org, and set up the philanthropy as a for-profit organization so it can work with venture capitalists, start companies and use any profits to finance further endeavors. It’s smart of Google’s founders to try using capitalist tools to save the planet; the market’s discipline should keep their philanthropy from backing too many lost causes. Still, whatever Google.org accomplishes, I’d bet that it will pale next to the social good accomplished by Google.com. The company’s founders may not have set out to help humanity with their search engine, but they have enriched countless lives by spreading ideas and connecting people. If you read Adam Smith’s famous passage about the invisible hand causing capitalists to unwittingly serve the public interest, you might conclude that Google’s founders are better off investing their time and money in improving their core business. 

I don’t think Smith would have any problem with Google.org. If compassionate capitalism is a more appealing brand, if Google and Whole Foods are using philanthropy to strengthen the invisible hand, even Smith would say they’re doing good. 

Keywords: [“company”,”founders”,”philanthropy”]
Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/16/opinion/16tierney.html

The Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education

In this dialogue, CCARE’s founder and director, Dr. James Doty, will ask Werner Erhard about his life’s work and how compassion has played a role. Werner Erhard is an original thinker whose ideas have transformed the effectiveness and quality of life for millions of people and thousands of organizations around the world. For nearly 50 years he has been the creator of innovative ideas and models of individual, organizational, and social transformation. His work has been the source of new perspectives for thinkers and practitioners in fields as diverse as business, education, philosophy, medicine, psychotherapy, developing countries, leadership, conflict resolution, and community building. 

Erhard has created new ways of seeing things in areas where progress has stalled or where breakthroughs would make a significant difference. A majority of the Fortune 100 companies and many foundations and governmental entities have used his ideas and models. Fortune magazine’s 40th anniversary issue, in examining the major contributions to management thinking, recognized Erhard’s ideas as one of the major innovations of the last few decades. In recognition of his humanitarian work in the U.S. and around the world, in 1988 Erhard was awarded the Mahatma Gandhi Humanitarian Award. 

Since 2002 Erhard has committed his time and intellectual effort almost exclusively to the academic world. Some of his recent research, writings, lectures, and courses can be accessed from his author page in the Social Sciences Research Network. More than three million people around the world have participated in the public, corporate, charitable, and academic programs and courses he has created. Erhard’s ideas were first introduced to the public through programs derived from his models, which programs included The est Training and The Forum of the 1970s and 1980s. 

Keywords: [“Erhard”,”ideas”,”people”]
Source: http://ccare.stanford.edu/…/conversations-on-compassion-with-werner-erhard

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-22-2018

Poverty Capitalism: Interview with Ananya Roy

Ananya Roy: Microfinance is one of those rare poverty alleviation ideas whose popularity cuts across the ideological spectrum. Proponents of social justice have hailed microfinance as an instrument to fight the redlining of the poor by exclusionary financial institutions. Although microfinance is not a substantial sector in the budgets of multilateral and bilateral donors, it is quite literally everywhere in the world of development, repeatedly touted as a poverty panacea. New portals of development, such as Kiva.org, have also made it possible for the globally minded citizens of the global North to feel an immediate and intimate connection to microfinance and to the poor women who are most often microfinance borrowers. There are at least two distinct paradigms at work within the world of microfinance: one where microfinance is a global financial industry and an increasingly profitable asset class; the second where microfinance is a part of an overall package of pro-poor development. 

Ananya Roy: Yes, this is a fundamental contradiction that lies at the heart of microfinance, and indeed many other poverty-alleviation efforts as well. Many proponents of microfinance see it as an alternative to state-led development, and as testament to the entrepreneurial efforts of the poor. Ananya Roy: Microfinance bears many of the characteristics of subprime lending. Very few genres of microfinance tackle such issues; those that do not systematically depoliticize the question of poverty. Josh Leon: Microfinance has long been applied in rural settings, an obvious place to look for the world’s poor. 

Ananya Roy: Many poverty alleviation interventions have been developed and implemented in rural areas-such as the famous conditional cash transfer programs of Mexico and Brazil and the microfinance programs of Bangladesh. Ananya Roy: Your poetic question is about microfinance but it also speaks to broader trends-to millennial challenges and hopes. 

Keywords: [“Microfinance”,”Poverty”,”Development”]
Source: http://fpif.org/poverty_capitalism_interview_with_ananya_roy

The End of Capitalism Has Begun

Postcapitalism is possible because of three major changes information technology has brought about in the past 25 years. Second, information is corroding the market’s ability to form prices correctly. The biggest information product in the world – Wikipedia – is made by volunteers for free, abolishing the encyclopedia business and depriving the advertising industry of an estimated $3bn a year in revenue. Information is a machine for grinding the price of things lower and slashing the work time needed to support life on the planet. We’re surrounded not just by intelligent machines but by a new layer of reality centred on information. 

There is, alongside the world of monopolised information and surveillance created by corporations and governments, a different dynamic growing up around information: information as a social good, free at the point of use, incapable of being owned or exploited or priced. I’ve surveyed the attempts by economists and business gurus to build a framework to understand the dynamics of an economy based on abundant, socially-held information. Once you understand that information is physical, and that software is a machine, and that storage, bandwidth and processing power are collapsing in price at exponential rates, the value of Marx’s thinking becomes clear. I’m concentrating on the economic transition triggered by information because, up to now, it has been sidelined. Today, the thing that is corroding capitalism, barely rationalised by mainstream economics, is information. 

The equivalent of the printing press and the scientific method is information technology and its spillover into all other technologies, from genetics to healthcare to agriculture to the movies, where it is quickly reducing costs. The main contradiction today is between the possibility of free, abundant goods and information; and a system of monopolies, banks and governments trying to keep things private, scarce and commercial. 

Keywords: [“information”,”new”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://www.alternet.org/economy/end-capitalism-has-begun

SparkNotes: The Jungle: Chapters 27-28

Marija’s entrance into prostitution culminates the essential accusation that Sinclair levels against capitalism: throughout The Jungle, he charges capitalism with trafficking in human lives. Human beings are despicably regarded as useful resources-means to an end rather than individuals-and are used until they are worn out and then ultimately thrown away. As a prostitute, Marija epitomizes this trafficking in human bodies, as society’s perception of her worth lies wholly in her ability to satisfy the basest desires of humankind. Just as the prostitutes are kept in a form of slavery, Sinclair often compares wage laborers to slaves, another form of trafficking in human bodies. Throughout the novel, human lives are bought and sold, although most wage laborers don’t even realize that they are part of a vast market of human flesh. 

To this point, the meaning of the title The Jungle has been made painfully clear: the world of the wage laborer is a savage realm characterized by a Darwinian struggle for survival. The structures of capitalism are a jungle of hidden nooks and crannies, each containing yet another dirty secret. Sinclair’s novel exposes the various levels of deception within the factories as well as the day-to-day details of the wage laborer’s life. Having gone to such great lengths to illustrate the evils of capitalism, Sinclair now offers socialism as the solution to the problems that the first twenty-seven chapters of the novel have explored in detail. The socialist political meeting proves anything but a jungle; rather, it is a haven from the cruel reality of capitalism. 

As the speaker catalogues the abuses and suffering of wage laborers, Jurgis reacts to socialism like a new, devout religious convert. Unlike the preacher at the religious revival meeting, who wanted commoners to better themselves according to the existing system, the socialist speaker wants commoners to motivate for change outside the system. 

Keywords: [“human”,”capitalism”,”laborer”]
Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/jungle/section9/page/2

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-21-2018

Is Capitalism Undemocratic?

If we as a society agree that every American has a right to free healthcare, free education, free water, or free things of any kind, that means we are agreeing to a situation in which value is unilaterally shifted from one position within our economy to another without a reciprocal exchange of value in return. Thus, rights cost something; and whenever there is a cost for a thing, there is a negotiation over the allocation of finite resources and who should bear the cost of that thing. His claim implies that the allocation of finite resources within a private company is subject to the rights of the proletariat, but as we’ve discussed already, such a right cannot exist unless it comes from a divine creator or some social contract. Workers cannot depend on an inviolable reservoir of rights. The only logically and philosophically consistent response to Marx’s central claim about the undemocratic nature of Capitalism is to say that nobody deserves anything at any time until and unless they prove that they can deliver enough value to somebody who has some other kind of value they wish to obtain. 

Unless somebody else is willing to enter into an exchange of value, the only means of obtaining value from some person or organization is through cooperation or brute force. If we take the path of brute force, the value creation process within society rapidly breaks down and everybody loses. There is only voluntary cooperation or brute force; rights do not exist except in the desires and dreams of the human mind. Crony Capitalism is the Culprit, Not a Deficiency of Rights. This chain of transactions amounts to an integrated value creation and distribution system that is neither democratic nor plutocratic. 

It can be depressing to analyze the origins of our personal values, societal norms, and human nature because an honest analysis usually takes us to conclusions that are uncomfortable. Thus, every businessperson, politician, and citizen has rational reasons to develop their ability to empathize and feel compassion for others if they want to contribute meaningful value to society and build successful organizations. 

Keywords: [“value”,”Right”,”economy”]
Source: https://eanfar.org/is-capitalism-undemocratic

Bleeding Heart Libertarians

Thanks to the folks at Bleeding Heart Libertarians for inviting me to blog here about my new e-book Human Capitalism: How Economic Growth Has Made Us Smarter – and More Unequal. With any luck I’ll motivate one or more BHL regulars to weigh in. The richer and more advanced a country’s economy grows, the more complex that economy becomes: more and more knowledge and know-how are distributed throughout the system, and the division of labor grows ever more specialized and intricate. Back in 1900 almost 80 percent of working Americans were farmers, manual laborers, or domestic servants; today, some 60 percent work in white-collar office jobs. When I say we’re getting smarter, what I really mean is we are becoming more fluent in highly abstract ways of thinking. 

So good – but alas there’s more to the story. The elite occupations that require analytical sophistication, strong people skills, high motivation, and meticulous planning will generally be filled by the people most flush with those skills, which they will hone even further over the course of their working lives. These elite workers will naturally tend to pass those skills along to their children – through their own parenting in the home, and through the influence of the communities in which they congregate. Once upon a time, when the world was much simpler, there were more people with the requisite skills to handle elite occupations than the number of elite slots. This period -the middle decades of the twentieth century – was one of declining class differences, as the descendants of the Great Migration from the turn of the century now found the paths of upward mobility more open than ever before. 

My policy proposals are an eclectic mix, and while I think they all push in the right direction, one stands out in my mind as a potential game changer: structural reform of K-12 education to allow more competition among schools for students. Elite kids start school with big advantages in cognitive skills, and those advantages continue to widen during the primary and secondary school years. 

Keywords: [“More”,”skills”,”percent”]
Source: http://bleedingheartlibertarians.com/2012/10/human-capitalism

Faux compassion is only worsening homeless crisis – Orange County Register

For years California voters have been nothing but compassionate towards the state’s homeless population, repeatedly voting to tax ourselves to provide more resources for affordable housing, mental health services, public transportation and addiction treatment facilities. In return, we’ve lost control of park space, rivers, public transit systems, downtown commercial hubs, and even residential neighborhoods. Politicians, advocates for the homeless and the courts have to understand that compassion is a two-way street. They want you to shut up, keep paying your rising tax bill and check your privilege. I for one have had it with their faux compassion and moral superiority. 

It’s time that they take responsibility for the trainwreck that they and their disastrous policies created. It’s not compassionate to allow addicts and the mentally ill to live life on the streets, and it’s not compassionate to expect the public to deal with the dangerous situations this creates. Over the last six years the number of those living in the streets and shelters of the city of Los Angeles and most of the county surged 75 percent. If you take out Los Angeles, national homelessness would have dropped last year for the first time since the recession, proving that the homeless crisis is either just a California problem – or that we’re attracting them from other parts of the nation. After it was determined that December’s Skirball Fire, which destroyed six homes and damaged a dozen others in the process, was started by a fire at a homeless encampment in nearby brush, the Los Angeles Fire Department conducted a study which found nearly 200 similar encampments pose a high fire risk to their surrounding communities. 

In the Koreatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, a 41-year-old transient was arrested Tuesday afternoon for sucker punching an 85-year-old grandma for no reason, leaving her with horrific injuries to her head and face. In Van Nuys, a transient was arrested after he was caught breaking into a home, watching pornography and masturbating. 

Keywords: [“transient”,”year”,”want”]
Source: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/14/faux-compassion-is-only…