J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-13-2018

On Weinstein: We’re All Accountable for Our Cultural Issues

Then many more stories emerged about the abuse of women, mainly by powerful men. After a while of digesting all this, I realized that women are stronger than men. Today, the world continues to favour men, because they’re men. The problem is not only that some power-hungry, egoistic men are sick. Rather, the problem is that when such men are sick, it has severe consequences for all of us, because men still, to a large extent, rule the world. I remember Rebecca Solnit saying something about men being the problem-not all men, but men. Because men, as philosopher Simone de Beauvoir said about women, aren’t born men; they become men. Gender can too easily turn into a lucrative identity of being this or that. It’s naïve and wrong to reduce men to being intrinsically morally bad. What Weinstein and his ilk have done is a violation of many women, but not only women. Due to capitalism, we’re told that freedom is related to property rights, as if anyone could own another human being. Narcissism, egoism, nationalism they’re all related to capitalism and the right to own a territory, the illusion of being in control and the belief that some people can treat others as they see fit, because of ownership, money and such. It shows people who feel superior because of money, gender, race or religion that the most powerful human being is a person who cares for what brings life.

Keywords: [“men”,”being”,”gender”]
Source: https://www.themindfulword.org/2018/survival-compassionate…

Socialism Is Not the Answer

Pope Francis is right to call attention to poverty, but socialism is not the solution. The pope’s emphasis on the needs of the poor is important, especially in today’s politics, where poverty is often a public-policy sideline. In calling attention to the problem, he fails to understand that free-market capitalism is not a cause of poverty, but a solution. In 1980, less than 1 percent of Argentinians lived in extreme poverty, while in neighboring Chile, the extreme-poverty rate exceeded 15 percent. Today, while the proportion of Argentinians living in extreme poverty has risen slightly, to nearly 3 percent, Chile has seen the most dramatic reduction in poverty in Latin America. Fewer than 2 percent of Chileans now live in extreme poverty. Poverty, which briefly declined at the beginning of Chávez’s reign, has begun rising rapidly. Although accurate figures are hard to come by, it is estimated that between one-third and one-half of the population now lives in poverty. In China alone, even the partial adoption of a market-oriented economy has saved more than 650 million people from poverty. Almost 84 percent of Chinese lived in extreme poverty in 1987. As Bono, hardly a right-wing icon, explains, ‘Capitalism takes more people out of poverty than aid. Throughout most of human history, most of mankind lived in truly abject poverty.

Keywords: [“poverty”,”more”,”capitalism”]
Source: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/424464/pope-and-poverty

Christian Heritage

These give us license to dismiss some ideas quickly, or to answer objections swiftly so that we might be free to mull over other ideas. A free market, we should remember, is not fueled by greed, but by service. First, taxing one group of people to give the money to another group of people is bad for the people who receive the money. When we tax one group to give the money to another we create disincentive for everyone to work, which leads to greater poverty for everyone. Second, taking from one group to give to another fails the compassion test because it is not compassionate to those who are having their wealth taken. We surely aren’t showing grace when we come to take what we will later give. If having more than someone else is a sure sign of greed, we are all guilty, including even those to whom we give money. Finally, and most importantly, asking the state to take from one group to give to others isn’t compassionate because we are not the ones making the sacrifice. I am not demonstrating a giving heart if I steal my neighbor’s car, and give it to a struggling single parent. Christians are called to be compassionate, which means we give what is ours, not what is our neighbors’. We give in the name of Jesus, not in the name of Uncle Sam. It says we are called to give of our own wealth, not the wealth of others.

Keywords: [“give”,”greed”,”more”]
Source: https://www.christianheritageonline.org/compassion-on-the-cheap

Compassion and Capitalism – The Best You Magazine

David Meltzer was born in Akron, Ohio In 1968 and was described as a bright and able student at school. Upon graduating, he entered the world of business, where he was soon part of the upper echelon of the business community. Everywhere he worked in the world of business, Meltzer appeared to have the Midas touch. In his 30s, already a multi-millionaire, Meltzer’s career went off the rails. Meltzer decided he needed to stop and look at how he’d previously created success. Meltzer explored spirituality, bringing a broader more balanced approach to his business life. Through this process, he worked out four principles that would become his guiding light in all his future business interactions. Meltzer soon rose to great business and personal success. It is this willingness to trust in what the universe is doing that defines Meltzer’s approach to life. It fit perfectly with the notion of gratitude, one of his own core beliefs in the philosophy of business. Whether it’s the elementary school, high school, college or law school he attended, he says Meltzer enjoys sharing the lessons he’s learned to empower young people who may be in a similar situation. His second book, Compassionate Capitalism: AJourney to the Soul of Business, was published In 2016 and is co-authored with Blaine Bartlett.

Keywords: [“Meltzer”,”business”,”works”]
Source: https://thebestyoumagazine.co/compassion-and-capitalism

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