J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-12-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – by Sanjiv Mehta at the #India2022Exchange

Sage launches Sage Foundation to lead social philanthropy

Sage’s 2+2+2 community model sets benchmark for FTSE 100 companies. Sage today launches the Sage Foundation which sets the standard for Corporate Compassionate Capitalism around the world. Each of Sage’s 14,000 employees will be able to contribute five days per year in work time to volunteer with any non-profit organization they elect to support. The Sage Foundation will also give grants to create entrepreneurial opportunities for the young and disadvantaged within communities, as well as grants to match employee charitable donations and fundraising. The Sage Foundation has created a model of ‘2+2+2’: donating 2% of employee time each year, 2% of free cash flow* and 2 of Sage’s smart technology products for any charity, social enterprise or non-profit organization. 

This model demonstrates Sage’s commitment to philanthropic leadership in the FTSE 100. Driven by Sage’s ambition to connect its customers, colleagues and communities within an integrated model, the Sage Foundation will be open for business globally from 1st October 2015. With tens of thousands of non-profit organizations as existing Sage customers, the Sage Foundation will enhance Sage’s relationship with charity and social enterprise. Non-profit organizations will be able to apply for donated Sage One, Sage Life or X3 products, through the newly created Donation program. The Sage Foundation will benefit from Sage revenues from the non-profit sector; notionally ‘2%’ of free cash flow is equivalent to revenue gained from non-profit sector in FY2014. 

Sage has reimagined business and brings energy, experience and technology to inspire our customers to fulfil their dreams. Sage is a FTSE 100 company with 14,000 employees in 24 countries. 

Keywords: [“Sage”,”community”,”organization”]
Source: http://www.sage.com/company/news-and-events/2015/06/02/sage-launches-sage-foundation-to-lead-social-philanthropy

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. 

Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers. 

Keywords: [“work”,”Church”,”made”]
Source: https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

How Individuals and Corporations Participate 02/15 by Karen Rands

Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. 

From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives. 

Keywords: [“company”,”invest”,”Compassionate”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands/2018/02/15/compassionate-capitalism–how-individuals-and-corporations-participate

I am a “compassionate capitalist.”

The business teaches poor/middle class how to file taxes. It’s meant as a check against corporations and rich folks getting all the breaks. It’s to level the playing field to the common person. Other capitalists who’ve seen this business model are entering the market. It works! 

In year two, we get enough customers to keep the business afloat. We level the playing field against corporations! Success! Now, any labor simply must come from overseas, paying as close to nothing as I can manage. The tax code change is good sort of! 

I don’t need new customers; the new tax code means they all have to come back for re-education! So, it works! People buy just enough to pay lobbyists, pay new accountants, keep website running, expand. I’ve made the world a better place, no doubt! The playing field between common folk & corporations is more leveled than before, surely! 

Until the next year. My business is gone, so money I paid to lobbyists to keep tax code frozen has dried up. Similar services offering tax education also dry up. Corporations pay a vastly smaller percentage of taxes than common folk. 

Keywords: [“business”,”pay”,”tax”]
Source: https://medium.com/@RickPaulas/i-am-a-compassionate-capitalist-6b80e1d643c4

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *