J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-20-2018

�Compassionate Capitalism,� An Amazon Best-Selling Book is Free For One More Day

Best Seller Publishing announces the release of Blaine Bartletts new book, Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business. It will be available for free download in the Amazon Kindle Store for one more day on July 15th. Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. 

The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. From our perspective, business is nothing less than a spiritual discipline, it requires the same integrity, commitment, intentionality, courage, discipline, and compassion as any other spiritual discipline. Compassionate Capitalism by Blaine Bartlett will be free and available for download on Amazon for 1 more day at: https://www. Compassionate Capitalism was an extremely beneficial read and a reminder that business isnt solely about the profits. Every aspect of our life today evolves around business, and so often people tend to lose sight of their goals and aspirations. 

Overall, there are many takeaways and I highly recommend reading it! Jeffrey RovnerCorporate America has made business turn for the worse. This book captures the idea that you can put the customer first and still find the resources necessary to have a successful business. Best Seller Publishing is a Los Angeles Publishing Company dedicated to helping business owners and entrepreneurs become the hunted with their best-selling books. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”book”,”today”]
Source: https://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=204205

Compassion, Christianity or Consumerism? The True Meaning of Christmas

As a result, we have lost sight of the true meaning of Christmas, and celebrate it in ways that are in direct opposition to its original intent. This year, on Black Friday, I was reminded about the true meaning of Christmas. Black Friday has become as much a part of the holiday season in the United States as Thanksgiving and Christmas. 33 million evergreen conifers are purchased each year, at around $35 each, for a market of $1.16 billion in Christmas tree sales. This is not suggesting to abolish Christmas altogether, but if every U.S. household reduced their Christmas budget by only thirty-percent and contributed that money to impoverished communities, we would meet the forecast amount to end world hunger. 

This tale of Christmas we share is a stark contrast to the true story of St. Nicholas. Today, Christmas is a celebration that revolves around fulfilling greed, not need, at the expense of the poor. The real genius-work behind this big fa├žade is the connection between Christmas and Christianity. Christmas marks the return of the sun after the winter solstice – the resurrection of light and the perseverance of unconditional love which nature manifests each year in the new life and returning warmth of springtime, from the desolate depths of winter. 

He saw the true meaning of Christmas and put an end to the charade. While his means were extreme, by stealing all the presents he learned that the real meaning of Christmas had nothing to do with exchanging gifts, but exchanging love. Let’s each of us be that Grinch, and take consumerism out of the Christmas mythology. 

Keywords: [“Christmas”,”year”,”love”]
Source: http://www.wakingtimes.com/2015/12/20/compassion-christianity-consumerism…

Capitalism’s stormy sea

Capitalism as a total world system is a relatively new part of human experience. By these measures capitalism is merely the blink of an eye. Economy was, as the social theorist Karl Polanyi has so brilliantly analysed, ‘socially embedded’ in such societies and subject to the prevailing values of that particular society rather than the kind of all-determining external force it has become under capitalism. Those who want to transform or even just tinker with our current system of corporate capitalism are confronted with a formidable task. One of the features of capitalism that has enabled it to survive is its ability both to create and to take advantage of its economic crises. 

Schumpeter saw this underlying attribute as a kind of positive resilience that keeps capitalism from collapsing under the weight of its own contradictions. Capitalism constantly puts these things at risk in its restless search for new avenues of profitable growth. Not only has capitalism shown great resilience in overcoming the periodic crises it has faced but it has also even been embraced by its one-time ideological opponents: state socialism in China and the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Our current phase of capitalism is underpinned by a much named but too little understood political philosophy called neoliberalism. Usually this is a phrase used by critics rather than proponents of capitalism. 

Under earlier forms of liberal democracy these could be counted on to play a moderately autonomous role in tempering capitalism. This makes for difficult terrain on which alternatives to capitalism must be built. 

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”political”,”become”]
Source: https://digital.newint.com.au/issues/102/articles/2344

We Need Sustainable Capitalism

What is clear to us and many others is that market capitalism has arrived at a critical juncture. The financial crisis has reinforced our view that sustainable development will be the primary driver of economic and industrial change over the next 25 years. At the Harvard Business School Centennial Global Business Summit held earlier this month, the future of market capitalism was one of the principal themes discussed. We founded Generation Investment Management in 2004 to develop a new philosophy of investment management and business more broadly. Our approach is based on the long-term, and on the explicit recognition that sustainability issues are central to business and should be incorporated in the analysis of business and management quality. 

While certainly not a complete list, the causes of the current financial crisis include: short-termism, poor governance and regulation, misaligned compensation and incentive systems, lack of transparency, and in some firms, poor leadership and a dysfunctional business culture. Forty years ago, Robert F. Kennedy reminded Americans that the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Gross National Product measure neither our national spirit nor our national achievement. Business – and by extension the capital markets – need to change. Such investments ignore the reality of the climate crisis and its consequences for business. 

Business and markets cannot operate in isolation from society or the environment. Business and the capital markets are best positioned to address these issues. We need a more long-term and responsible form of capitalism. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”market”,”National”]
Source: https://algore.com/news/we-need-sustainable-capitalism

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