J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-31-2018

Video: Robert Reich on ‘Inequality for All’

With which you can emotionally connect with people and open people’s minds and eyes and hearts. On this issue of widening inequality there’s so much confusion, many people if they’re, you know, if they’re rightwing, they want to blame the poor, if they’re leftwing they want to blame the rich. One way of looking at and measuring inequality is to look at the earnings of people at the top versus the earnings of the typical worker in the middle. ROBERT REICH: Both about what looked like a fundamentally unfair subsidy going from everybody, taxpayers, to mostly the top one percent, that is the people on Wall Street who had blown it. Because you see very wealthy people, not everyone, but many very wealthy people and many big corporations use their money to buy rules that favor their positioning. 

I think again, it’s important to bear in mind that some inequality is necessary if we’re going to have a capitalist system that creates incentives for people to work hard and to invent and to try very hard. I would say people who self-identify as middle class extend from people who are earning around $25,000 a year to people who are earning well, in major cities, expensive cities like New York or San Francisco, a lot of people call themselves middle class who are earning $200,000 a year because the cost of living is so high. BILL MOYERS: Speaking of real people, we began this series last year with three broadcasts on inequality. ROBERT REICH: We’ve got to a point where money is so powerful a force in politics and in the media, that attention is paid mostly to people who are wealthy or upper middle class. ROBERT REICH: It’s a petition to the CEOs of Walmart and McDonald’s as the exemplars in these two big, big sectors of the economy, employing huge numbers of people to raise their wages to $15 an hour. 

ROBERT REICH: As an engine of prosperity for most people. JACOB KORNBLUTH: There’s a lot of people who made a lot of money who think this widening economic inequality is bad for them and it’s bad for the economy. 

Keywords: [“People”,”work”,”BILL”]
Source: https://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-inequality-for-all

A Different View of the Homeless

In a rather depressing cartoon, a rotund, wealthy man walking up a New York avenue comes across three homeless people, each staking out a different street corner. The wealthy man continues past him up the avenue and meets the third homeless man. After walking a few more blocks, he turns another corner and runs directly into the three homeless men standing together. The younger of the monks looked long at the homeless man, who was obviously in distress and need. In addition to affirmation and acceptance, the homeless poor desperately need a sense of home, that is, to actually have a home, even a room, which they can enter, close the door to, and live in peace. 

Just as all of us thrive in the sanctuary of our own homes, the homeless need not just a shelter, a room in anothers house, but their own space. In Evanston, Illinois, north of Chicago, a forward-looking faith community called Lake Street Church is trying to address the needs of the homeless. When we are separated from all the goods of this world, we are no different from our homeless brothers and sisters. The homeless poor are everywhere on the subcontinent, and I noticed in the vast majority of them that, though destitute and possessing nothing, they were happy and serene beyond comprehension, a serenity connected with their faith, not their poverty! They taught me that one needs very little to be happy, that happiness is a spiritual quality that has absolutely nothing to do with wealth and possessions. 

As long as we ignore the homeless or apply a Band-Aid solution to the symptoms of a much larger disorder in our world, the problem will grow and finally get out of control. Our leadership, particularly with respect to the homeless problem, needs a special kind of guidance, that of our spiritual communities themselves. As a monk, a mystic in the world, pursuing my spiritual practice each day, I have awakened to the horrible inequity in the sufferings of the homeless persons I have known for so long. 

Keywords: [“homeless”,”people”,”street”]
Source: http://www.grandtimes.com/A_Different_View.html

IN FULFILLMENT OF END TIMES PROPHECIES!1- Christian Updates

GOD IS CALLING HIS PEOPLE BACK HOME – TO ISRAEL – IN FULFILLMENT OF END TIMES PROPHECIES!1 God is beginning to call the Jewish people back to Israel, from all corners of the globe. Lately, Jews have been returning to Israel by the hundreds of thousands from the old U.S.S.R., again spurred by intense persecution. The lifestyle offered Jews here not only keeps American Jews here, it attracts Jews to migrate from Israel to America. Basically, Jews are returning to Israel from most points on the globe. For the purposes of our study, Kahane was an interesting person because he was urging American Jews to consider migrating to Israel, before the persecution he thought he saw on the American horizon came to fruition! 

Let us return now to this article, speaking of Shifra Hoffman. We want to focus on the assertion by Rabbi Kahane’s organization, that God has promised to the Jews all the land of Israel. God promised the land of Israel to Abraham and his descendents, but many people believe that His promise has been revoked, because of the Jew’s sins against Him, and especially, because of their sin in killing Jesus Christ. Second, the Bible also declares that God will restore Israel to her ancient land, after she has been out of it for many, many years. God will do all this for Israel, for the glory of His mighty name, which has been profaned for so many years. 

Again, we see that all the Jews are going to come back to Israel. In these verses, God is promising full reinstatement of the nation, to whom Jews from all over the world will flock to live! No longer will there be more Jews outside Israel than inside; no longer will there be any hint of a Diaspora. These borders include Lebanon, most of Jordan, a lot of Syria, and even some of Iraq! This coming war in the Middle East will probably accomplish this border enlargement, thus preparing the way for the fulfillment of the prophecies to bring all the Jews back to Israel. 

Keywords: [“ISRAEL”,”Jew”,”GOD”]
Source: http://www.cuttingedge.org/news/n1064.html

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-30-2018

Uncharitable: Dan Pallotta

A courageous call to free charity from its ideological and economic constraints. Uncharitable goes where no other book on the nonprofit sector has dared to tread. Where other texts suggest ways to optimize performance inside the existing paradigm, Uncharitable suggests that the paradigm itself is the problem and calls into question our fundamental canons about charity. Author Dan Pallotta argues that society’s nonprofit ethic acts as a strict regulatory mechanism on the natural economic law. These double-standards place the nonprofit sector at extreme disadvantage to the for profit sector on every level. 

While the for profit sector is permitted to use all the tools of capitalism to advance the sale of consumer goods, the nonprofit sector is prohibited from using any of them to fight hunger or disease. Capitalism is blamed for creating the inequities in our society, but charity is prohibited from using the tools of capitalism to rectify them. Ironically, this is all done in the name of charity, but it is a charity whose principal benefit flows to the for-profit sector and one that denies the nonprofit sector the tools and incentives that have built virtually everything of value in society. This irrational system, Pallotta explains, has its roots in 400-year-old Puritan ethics that banished self-interest from the realm of charity. Pallotta has written an important, provocative, timely, and accessible book-a manifesto about equal economic rights for charity. 

His book provocatively challenges traditional views of how charities should operate and provides a thought-provoking alternative. He explains in graphic detail how these values undercut what charities are trying to do and prevent them from accomplishing all that they might. DAN PALLOTTA founded Pallotta Team-Works, the company that invented the AIDS Rides and Breast Cancer 3-Day events, which raised over half a billion dollars and netted $305 million in nine years-more money, raised more quickly for these causes than any known private event operation in history. 

Keywords: [“charity”,”Pallotta”,”sector”]
Source: http://www.upne.com/1584657231.html

‘Dietland’ Review

AMC’s Dietland would still be culturally notable if it were merely a timely and trenchant drama about fat acceptance. Plum’s fate isn’t to look like a Disney princess, but to help all women feel like one – through whatever means necessary. Dietland is a riveting whirligig of a show: a tale of self-discovery, a manifesto about sizeism, a screed against consumer capitalism and a mystery about a radical feminist terrorist cell that uses vigilante violence to punish rapists, pedophiles andmagazine editors. For a series that’s mostly set in a picturesque cafe, a glamorous magazine headquarters and an unrealistically nice New York apartment, Dietland begins with a gritty montage. Dietland’s boldest assertion is that milder forms of sexism – like being judged for being plus-sized or catcalled on the street – are on a spectrum with more brutal acts at the extreme end. 

It just might be that pattern-finding – that grouping of diverse but related acts of transgression – that gives Dietland its significant emotional power: There’s no end to the variations that misogyny will take. The two strands of Dietland – Plum’s journey toward self-acceptance and the payback murders in the background – don’t quite seem like they belong on the same show, and thus make for an intriguing package. Plum tells us in voiceover that she’s in a happier future, and that what we see is the beginning of her quest. It’s still unclear whether Nash’s slightly numbed performance is her interpretation of Plum’ fearful and ascetic lifestyle or a reflection of the actress’ talents. In its early going, at least, Dietland satisfies through its incisive satire of fat phobia, as well as its compassionate exploration of how low self-esteem can circumscribe not just one’s life, but one’s dreams for one’s self as well. 

Being pressured to look a certain way is bad enough, but being made into a pariah for veering so far from the beauty ideal is a living nightmare. There’s a weary relief in being reminded that, yes, femininity can feel like a psychic hellscape sometimes. 

Keywords: [“Plum”,”Dietland”,”being”]
Source: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/dietland-review-1114756

Can Capitalism Be Compatible with Christianity?

I am a natural born U.S. citizen; I am practically a natural born Christian, too. At Vacation Bible School, we pledged allegiance to the United States and Christian flags with absolutely no sense of irony. It was made clear to me that good Christians supported their country, even if its actions ran counter to the teachings of Jesus. That’s just one example of the tensions that can arise for someone trying to be both a faithful Christian and a faithful U.S. 

citizen. Over the years, I began to try to think seriously and critically about those tensions; specifically, I began to think about how I and others could appropriately live in the United States as Christian citizens. Take, for example, the matter of a Christian’s stance toward U.S. economic policies and practices. I am neither an economist nor the son of an economist, but we all know that the heart and soul of the U.S. 

economic system is capitalism. If I am a Christian operating a business, then ideally grace, love and generosity will be churned out along with profits. Still, it is difficult to make a case that capitalism is a Christian system or is even particularly compatible with Christian practice, given that it is based on competitiveness that all too often degenerates into making a profit at any cost – even if that cost is a human one – and into an atmosphere of greed and selfishness. It seems to me, too, that many professed followers of Christ who put capitalism ahead of their Christianity do not take seriously enough the very clear bias of God – as God is revealed in the Bible – toward the poor and the helpless. I’m not convinced that we couldn’t have it both ways – that is, that we couldn’t foster a robust business climate that still finds a way, through the combined efforts of government, churches and nonprofits, to protect and care for the poor and helpless among us. 

I furthermore believe that Christians could and should be in the forefront of such an effort. 

Keywords: [“Christian”,”way”,”us”]
Source: https://www.ethicsdaily.com/can-capitalism-be-compatible-with…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-29-2018

What is a ‘system of privilege’? – Allan G. Johnson

White people are generally assumed to be law-abiding until they show some sign that they are not, while people of color are routinely assumed to be criminals or potential criminals until they show they’re not. A white person, for example, can work hard and have little to show for it, can be mistreated by the police without cause, be denied a job they’re qualified for. What privilege does is load the odds one way or the other so that the chance of bad things happening to white people as a category of people is much lower than for everyone else, and the chance of good things happening is much higher. A system of white privilege, for example, is white-dominated, which means the default is for white people to occupy positions of power. White-dominance doesn’t mean that all white people are powerful, only that the powerful tend almost always to be white, and when a person of color occupies a position of power, that will be noted as an exception to the rule. 

White-identification also encourages whites to be unaware of themselves as white, as if they didn’t have a race at all. It also encourages whites to be unaware of white privilege. White-centeredness is the tendency to put white people and what they do at the center of attention-the front page of the newspaper or magazine, the main character in the movie. When you organize a society in this way, the result will be patterns of unearned advantage that are available to whites simply because they are socially identified as ‘white. Abundant research, for example, shows that whites and blacks are equally likely to use illegal drugs, which would lead us to expect them to be equally likely to wind up in prison for that offense. 

On top of that, young white males are the demographic most likely to sell illegal drugs. The white privilege in this example, is the practice of the criminal justice system to overlook or respond less harshly to drug crimes committed by whites, while the corresponding oppressive consequence for people of color is the systematic selection of people of color for arrest, prosecution, and punishment. 

Keywords: [“White”,”people”,”privilege”]
Source: http://www.agjohnson.us/glad/what-is-a-system-of-privilege

Jon Chopan

Despite the notion that we are voiceless, it seems to me that the challenge of a good creative writing instructor is to teach students that they do indeed have a voice and that their voice, that all our voices in concert, have meaning. We should be struggling with our students as writers, and students of writing, to leave behind something worth protecting, worth defending, something that contributes to the growth of this culture. One of my greatest struggles, as a writer, as a human being, is to find purpose in the things I do. This, it seems, is the job of a good creative writing teacher, to help their students in their quest to find purpose. In a culture that has grown weak on faith in the arts, in the power of words, it would seem now, when things are most bleak, that our job is to bring new hope to an army of writers who will go forward and make their mark on this nation. 

Having been the student of two fine writing programs, and having had the privilege to be around so many skilled and compassionate instructors, I truly believe in this purpose as a creative writing teacher. I mean, in my classes, to help my students find their stories, to find the unique thing it is that they were meant to say. I also believe in the power of students to return that favor, be it through a direct act or through simply watching them grow as writers and learning from them. Nothing thrills me more than the energy of young writers, how the world of words seems new and boundless to them, and that energy keeps me going as a writer, as a teacher, because it has the power to breathe life into the things we all come to take for granted, the debates and books and tools we feel we already know so well. In my own writing I hope to give voice to the people and places I come from. 

I did not become a writer or a teacher of writing because it seemed easy, or because it was something I happened upon. I believe that by fostering the creativity born of writing, born in well told stories and in boldly written poems, that we are contributing to a kind of creative power that is much needed. 

Keywords: [“writes”,”student”,”teach”]
Source: http://www.glimmertrain.com/bulletins/essays/b137chopan.php

9 FDR’s New Deal

They got it in the form of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal, but there was more continuity between Hoover and the early New Deal than most people realize, and more mixed messages coming from Franklin Roosevelt’s campaign than most historians remember. Having a capitalist like Joe Kennedy on board helped FDR insulate the New Deal from right-wing criticism. Race & the New Deal.The New Deal excluded sharecroppers and tenant farmers from farming relief in order to discriminate against minorities. These New Deal flaws have led modern civil rights commentator Ta-Nehisi Coates to argue that modern liberalism is intrinsically racist, but many civil rights leaders have been leftists or liberals and even the New Deal helped minorities in important ways. Second New Deal: Labor ReformThe Second New Deal improved workers’ leverage as strikers and their pay. 

Second New Deal: Housing ReformThe Government also reformed housing during this second phase of the New Deal. FDR won four elections, and won by a historic landslide in 1936, just after the more radical Second New Deal kicked in. In response, FDR threatened to pack the Court with more judges, all favorable to the New Deal. He didn’t play up the pro-New Deal angle but merely suggested adding one judge for each existing judge over 70 that refused to retire and claimed the bigger court would lighten their workload. The Court-Packing Scheme was ridiculous – with that precedent, any president could simply add judges favorable to his policies – but FDR was cleverly focusing the public’s attention on the Court threatening to undo the New Deal. 

FDR was reminding the Court that they were out of step with the times, regardless of the legal technicalities of the New Deal – technicalities known to legal scholars as the Constitution. Since his court-packing bill died, FDR claimed he lost the battle but won the war, saving the New Deal. The New Deal led to bigger government with the establishment of Social Security and its offshoot programs like unemployment insurance and Medicare. 

Keywords: [“new”,”Deal”,”government”]
Source: http://sites.austincc.edu/caddis/fdrs-new-deal

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-28-2018

The vegan movement split, and now the disruptor has the meat industry on high alert

The American vegan movement was always its own worst enemy. The vegan movement’s brain finally outgrew its heart, and in less than two decades the pragmatic vein of the movement has morphed into one of the biggest disruptors of the American food system. Friedrich leads The Good Food Institute, a lobbying shop in DC that represents the interests of meat-alternative food products; Shapiro helped mastermind a cage-free ballot initiative in Massachusetts that will reshape how food animals are produced across the country; Prescott has made inroads into major investment banks; Meier leads undercover investigation efforts to expose the poor living conditions of many farm animals; and Tetrick, who as a college student would travel from West Virginia to DC to hang out with the pragmatists, was a founder of Hampton Creek, the well-known eggless condiments company. By picking on farm animal production techniques that appeal to consumer emotions, the group forced companies with so-called factory farms into the difficult position of defending practices that can seem draconian. Voters who empathize with farm animals were much more likely to buy into Shapiro’s measure. 

If sales data show consumers care about animal welfare, Matthew Prescott can use-and has used-it to convince investment banks to pressure companies, such as McDonald’s, to change their practices. Companies such as Perfect Day, Beyond Meat, and Hampton Creek are developing meat and dairy products marketed as better for the environment and the animals. Despite the broad reach and proven efficacy of the vegan pragmatism, not everyone in the larger vegan movement is impressed. The 2001 split in the vegan movement was painful, leaving behind feelings of resentment that never healed. From the absolutist point-of-view, the pragmatists diminished the importance of fighting for animal lives by concentrating their energies on farm animal welfare. 

A commitment to reducing animal suffering, argues Gary Francione, a Rutgers University law professor, was an abdication of the bigger mission of freeing animals altogether. The absolutist tactics estrange the vegan movement from mainstream culture, the pragmatists argue. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”farm”,”movement”]
Source: https://qz.com/829956/how-the-vegan-movement-broke-out-of-its-echo…

MARXISM ALLIANCE

Its primary mission is to emphasise the similarity and compatibility of the Buddhist teachings with those of Classical Marxism, and to assert that both systems of thought are motivated by compassion for the suffering of humanity, and emphasises a radical method of escape from that suffering. Buddhism and Marxism share a common philosophical grounding that is dynamic, ingenious, and transformative. Buddhism and Marxism arrive at exactly the same conclusions, but through diverse and yet complimentary pathways. The ancient Indian spiritual seeker Sakyamuni Buddha, and the modern German academic Karl Marx, were not only outstanding intellectuals of their day, but the powerful influence of their respective systems of thought has continued to influence world thinking into the post-modern period of human development. The BMA exists to provide free education about Buddhist and Marxist thought, and encourages and supports any individual or group who is endeavouring to better their understanding through the development of the mind. 

As a result of these changes in Asia, the Buddhist Sangha has led the way in making clear the fundamental compatibility of the Dharma with Marxist thought, and in so doing has made Communist education freely available to ordinary people. Through the Buddhist Sangha embracing Marxist-Leninism, Buddhism has become an important element in maintaining the stability of the Communist State. The BMA is of the opinion that many facets of Buddhism in the West have been corrupted and hijacked by the bourgeoisie, and used in its habit of continuously justifying predatory capitalism. The BMA firmly rejects this ‘pseudo-Buddhism’ and advises all the genuine seekers interested in the study of Buddhism, to find authentic teachers and reliable sources of information. Do not bring emotional or intellectual immaturity into this thought community. 

The bourgeois system claims to extol ‘freedom of thought’ – so exercise it. By all means, have your own thoughts and live your own life – but do not ‘infect’ this sacred psycho-physical space with bourgeois delusion, fetishism, and excess. 

Keywords: [“thought”,”Buddhist”,”BMA”]
Source: https://buddhistsocialism.weebly.com

The Real Reason for the Growing Gap Between Rich and Poor

The tasks most people used to do can now be done more cheaply by lower-paid workers abroad or by computer-driven machines. As a result, Americans pay more for broadband Internet, food, airline tickets and banking services than the citizens of any other advanced nation. Bankruptcy laws have been loosened for large corporations-airlines, automobile manufacturers, even casino magnates like Donald Trump-allowing them to leave workers and communities stranded. The largest banks and auto manufacturers were bailed out in 2008, shifting the risks of economic failure onto the backs of average working people and taxpayers. Today, nearly one out of every three working Americans is in a part-time job. 

The portion of workers with any pension connected to their job has fallen from just over half in 1979 to under 35 percent today. Fifty years ago, when General Motors was the largest employer in America, the typical GM worker, backed by a strong union, earned $35 an hour in today’s dollars. Now America’s largest employer is Wal-Mart, and the typical entry-level Wal-Mart worker, without a union, earns about $9 an hour. The underlying problem is not just globalization and technological changes that have made most American workers less competitive. The more basic problem is that the market itself has become tilted ever more in the direction of moneyed interests that have exerted disproportionate influence over it, while average workers have steadily lost bargaining power-both economic and political-to receive as large a portion of the economy’s gains as they commanded in the first three decades after World War II. 

Reversing the scourge of widening inequality requires reversing the upward pre-distributions within the rules of the market, and giving average people the bargaining power they need to get a larger share of the gains from growth. It will be between a majority of Americans who have been losing ground, and an economic elite that refuses to recognize or respond to its growing distress. He has written 13 books, including the best-sellers Aftershock and The Work of Nations. 

Keywords: [“Work”,”American”,”more”]
Source: http://www.newsweek.com/real-reason-growing-gap-between-rich-and-poor-377662

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-27-2018

Why Become a Nurse?

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, understaffed nursing schools must turn away qualified applicants because of a limited number of nurse educators. Not only does the number of RN graduates suffer, but also the number of advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and nurse managers trained to fill open positions; thus increasing the demand for nursing professionals all across the board. Multiple Career Paths: Nurses may fill general practice positions, such as becoming a registered nurse or nurse practitioner. Others may concentrate on a specialty, as seen in the oncology nurse or family nurse practitioner. As a nurse for ten years, Rose spent most of her time in LTC and SNF management, and calls nursing an appealing field because it ‘teaches you as you go. 

MSN – Registered nurses with an interest in becoming an advanced practice nurse, nurse educator, nurse anesthetist or nurse manager, must earn a Master’s of Science in Nursing through an accredited graduate degree program. Attending a degree program is not the only manner in which a nurse can become educated, enhance his or her skills, and/or gain valuable experience. Specialties: Nurses with specializations and certifications often earn higher salaries with some of the highest-paying nurse specialties including Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, Nurse Researcher, and Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner. Registered nurse credentials add value to a work history that is often respected in other fields, which makes it easier for nurses to find work if they become disabled, retire, or seek new employment. Lattavo is now the President of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, and says she is grateful for making the decision to become a nurse. 

From classroom to workplace, the support system available to a nurse is unending, and includes the likes of professors, clinical instructors, faculty, alumni, doctors, and other nurses. Brock’s work history includes medical sales, working with oncology patients, caring for infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, starting a traveling nurse agency, heading a nurse staffing business, and serving as a patient care coordinator for an insurance company. 

Keywords: [“nurse”,”nursing”,”work”]
Source: http://everynurse.org/become-nurse

Eugene V. Debs

As a rule, large capitalists are Republicans and small capitalists are Democrats, but workingmen must remember that they are all capitalists, and that the many small ones, like the fewer large ones, are all politically supporting their class interests, and this is always and everywhere the capitalist class. The political solidarity of the working class means the death of despotism, the birth of freedom, the sunrise of civilization. The capitalist class is represented by the Republican, Democratic, Populist and Prohibition parties, all of which stand for private ownership of the means of production, and the triumph of any one of which will mean continued wage-slavery to the working class. Deny it as may the cunning capitalists who are clear-sighted enough to perceive it, or ignore it as may the torpid workers who are too blind and unthinking to see it, the struggle in which we are engaged today is a class struggle, and as the toiling millions come to see and understand it and rally to the political standard of their class, they will drive all capitalist parties of whatever name into the same party, and the class struggle will then be so clearly revealed that the hosts of labor will find their true place in the conflict and strike the united and decisive blow that will destroy slavery and achieve their full and final emancipation. The working class must be emancipated by the working class. 

Woman must be given her true place in society by the working class. The working class must be employed by the working class. The fruits of labor must be enjoyed by the working class. War, bloody war, must be ended by the working class. The master class has always declared the wars; the subject class has always fought the battles. 

The master class has had all to gain and nothing to lose, while the subject class has had nothing to gain and all to lose – especially their lives. Here let me emphasize the fact – and it cannot be repeated too often – that the working class who fight all the battles, the working class who make the supreme sacrifices, the working class who freely shed their blood and furnish the corpses, have never yet had a voice in either declaring war or making peace. 

Keywords: [“class”,”work”,”capitalist”]
Source: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Eugene_V._Debs

After Capitalism

To put it into a slogan: Capitalism Is No Alternative, or CINA. Four recent books provide radical and practical alternative visions for both the workplace and the economy more generally. These turbulent last four years are only a beginning to a revolutionary era of transformation away from capitalism. 5Wolff reminds us that democracy is inconsistent with the production of surplus-value in capitalism and the profit motive. All these authors also underscore the social pathologies generated by capitalism. Most investments in contemporary capitalism are highly speculative and short-term, rather than productive and long-term. 

They each provide alternative models to socioeconomic pathologies that constitute the ontology of capitalism. Schweickart offers a moral and ethical critique of capitalism, along with presenting the negative socioeconomic effects the dynamics and tendencies produce on human beings within the system in the form of inequality, unemployment, overwork, poverty, economic instability, and environmental degradation. Maheshvarananda has in mind a very long-term alternative to capitalism. Clearly all four of these revolutionary thinkers believe the time to transform society is now, the time to democratize the workplace is now, the time to recognize CINA and finally absent capitalism from existence is now. Their call to action is radically consistent with systemic theories of capitalism, and with the understanding of capitalism’s normal state as stagnation, periodic financial collapse, and individual worker hardship. 

Although there is certain to be disagreement as to explanations of the quadruple crises of global capitalism and in the models of alternative societies to today’s failed system or CINA, there is no room to claim TINA! Also see Barry C. Lynn, Cornered: The New Monopoly Capitalism and the Economics of Destruction for dozens and dozens examples of how oligopolistic firms supersede the constraints of the market and use their sheer size, vast resources, and endless political power to control and direct virtually every industry in the United States, effectively reinstituting the monopoly power of sixteenth-century feudalism. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”political”,”economic”]
Source: http://proutaftercapitalism.blogspot.com

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-26-2018

Human capital

Many theories explicitly connect investment in human capital development to education, and the role of human capital in economic development, productivity growth, and innovation has frequently been cited as a justification for government subsidies for education and job skills training. Pierre Bourdieu offers a nuanced conceptual alternative to human capital that includes cultural capital, social capital, economic capital, and symbolic capital. Just as land became recognized as natural capital and an asset in itself, human factors of production were raised from this simple mechanistic analysis to human capital. It is broken down or defined, human capital is vitally important for an organization’s success; human capital increases through education and experience. Human capital is also important for the success of cities and regions: a 2012 study examined how the production of university degrees and R&D activities of educational institutions are related to the human capital of metropolitan areas in which they are located. 

The transformation of raw human resource into highly productive human resource with these inputs is the process of human capital formation. The intangible human capital, on the other hand, is an instrument of promoting comprehensive development of the nation because human capital is directly related to human development, and when there is human development, the qualitative and quantitative progress of the nation is inevitable. United Nations publishes Human Development Report on human development in different nations with the objective of evaluating the rate of human capital formation in these nations. Human capital is distinctly different from the tangible monetary capital due to the extraordinary characteristic of human capital to grow cumulatively over a long period of time. Rate of human capital formation in the future generation happens to be more than the rate of human capital formation in the current generation. 

Specific human capital refers to skills or knowledge that is useful only to a single employer or industry, whereas general human capital is useful to all employers. When human capital is assessed by activity based costing via time allocations it becomes possible to assess human capital risk. 

Keywords: [“Human”,”capital”,”development”]
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_capital

Global Capitalism at War with Itself

This week the threatened tariffs from Canada, China, and the European Union that were initiated in response to the U.S tariffs initiated by #45 have gone into effect. Thousands of migrant parents from Central America have been separated from their children, while others are being detained in tent cities in the blistering Texas heat. At the same time, a similar scenario plays out in Europe where German Chancellor Angela Merkel is under fire for imploring the German people, as well as her European allies to develop an open and compassionate approach to immigration in this time of a global migrant crisis. In language that echoes the words of Jesus in his famous sheep and the goats parable of Matthew 25, Merkel has challenged her colleagues and citizens with the idea that how they handle the migrant crisis is a reflection of whether or not they truly embrace the democratic values of justice and freedom they freely proclaim. While these two issues at first glance may not seem connected, in reality, they are deeply connected as they are the result of a neoliberal capitalism run amok, benefitting the few at the expense of the many. 

It’s a philosophy in which there are winners and losers, with no regret or recompense for the losers. Those in between are the pawns manipulated to justify the inequity. What is seldom acknowledged is that global capitalists made sure the game was rigged in their favor so that elections were bought and paid for, and few if any radical voices – like a Bernie Sanders or the new Mexican President Obrador – get in. Now the capitalists are fighting among themselves, instituting tariffs as a way of somehow protecting their economies that are inextricably linked together in the global capitalist web. Rather I could only marvel at how the people whose countries control an overwhelming percentage of world’s wealth could be so petty with each other and so callous toward the truly poor in their midst and the migrants on their borders. 

God who abides with poor and the oppressed, looks on as thousands at borders long only for a comfortable bed, a safe home and the basic essentials of life, weeps. Metcalf, S. Neoliberalism: The idea that swallowed the world. 

Keywords: [“migrant”,”45″,”global”]
Source: http://drickboyd.org/global-capitalism-at-war-with-itself-while-migrants…

There is No Third Way

Writing during an age in which the expropriation of the means of production by the state and the imposition of full-scale socialism with central planning was a real possibility even in Western Europe, Röpke bravely defended private property, the free market, free international trade, and market-determined prices and wages. While out of step with the prevailing economic orthodoxies of his time, Röpke nevertheless helped save at least part of his fatherland from the poverty and stagnation that would have followed inexorably from the statist economic policies favored by German social democrats and Anglo-American occupiers. The neoliberal economists of the GermanFreiburgSchool, Walter Eucken and Wilhelm Röpke, denied that what Germany needed was more government control of the economy. If there is one area in which Röpke’s ideas can be praised without qualification it is in his advocacy of political and economic decentralism and the closely related idea of subsidiarity. Röpke pointed out that Switzerland was more genuinely democratic than any other Western country because political power was divided between a federal parliament and numerous self-governing cantons. 

According to Zmirak, Röpke opposed the supranational economic and political organizations that began emerging in the wake of the Second World War. Although Röpke defended the autonomy of historic regions within larger political entities, he also defended the independence of the sovereign nation-state as a bulwark against the emergence of such supranational bureaucracies. According to Zmirak, Röpke accepted many of the socialist and traditionalist criticisms of historic capitalism. Röpke made a fatal concession to the socialist cause in agreeing that unrestrained capitalism had proven socially destructive and unsustainable. There are three inherent weaknesses with Röpke’s distinction between compatible and incompatible market interventions. 

A passionate critic of socialism and the welfare state, Röpke was nonetheless keenly attuned to capitalism’s destructive elements and the intrinsic limits of the market. We need Mises, not Röpke, to save us from the despotic hand of the modern WelfareCorporatistState. 

Keywords: [“Röpke”,”state”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://mises.org/library/there-no-third-way

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-25-2018

20th WCP: A Property Owning Democracy or a Liberal Socialism?: Which One is More Compatible with Rawlsian Justice?

3) But he himself rejects a welfare-state capitalism and illustrates a property-owning democracy and a liberal socialism as economic regimes consistent with his justice as fairness. Both a property-owning democracy and welfare state capitalism allow private property in productive assets. Welfare state capitalism accepts as given substantial inequality in the initial distribution of property and skill endowments, and then seeks to redistribute income ex post; property-owning democracy seeks greater equality in the ex ante distribution of property and skill endowments, with correspondingly less emphasis on subsequent redistributive measures. What I have argued till now does not show that property-owning democracy is more compatible with Rawls’s political liberalism than liberal democratic socialism is. 28) I believe that even without these additions to the list of basic rights Rawls should favor property-owning democracy over liberal socialism in modern democracies. 32). When a practical decision is to be made between property-owning democracy and liberal socialist regime, we look to society’s historical circumstances, to its traditions of political thought and practice. 

Therefore the problem of choice between the two forms of regime at the constitutional stage should be understood as the problem of which kind of regime is more compatible with the features of modern democracies. Property-owning democracy permits the existence of a wider variety of ownership rights, including socialist forms of ownership. If Rawls’s political liberalism accept the fact of pluralism seriously, the right of private property in productive assets should be recognized as an additional but important right at the constitutional stage, so property-owning democracy should be favored in modern democratic conditions. The attempts to argue that Rawls’s two principles of justice are more compatible with liberal socialism is related to the importance of democracy in the workplace. 37). The more reasonable solution seems to me that both worker-managed firms and firms consisting of capitalists and workers, are included in a constitutional regime, that is, property-owning democracy. 38) For Rawls believes that Mill’s idea of worker managed firms is fully compatible with property-owning democracy. 

Keywords: [“democracy”,”property-owning”,”political”]
Source: http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Poli/PoliJung.htm

Scientists Are Beginning to Figure Out Why Conservatives Are Conservative

William Temple, dressed as a Revolutionary soldier, attends the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s Road to Majority event in Washington, DC, on Friday, June 20, 2014, to mobilize religious conservative voters ahead of the upcoming midterm elections and the 2016 presidential contest. The approach has many virtues, one of which being that it lets you see where a community of scholars and thinkers stand with respect to a controversial or provocative scientific idea. In the latest issue of the journal, this process reveals the following conclusion: A large body of political scientists and political psychologists now concur that liberals and conservatives disagree about politics in part because they are different people at the level of personality, psychology and even traits like physiology and genetics. In other words, the conservative ideology, and especially one of its major facets – centered on a strong military, tough law enforcement, resistance to immigration, widespread availability of guns – would seem well tailored for an underlying, threat-oriented biology. Twenty-six different scholars or groups of scholars then got an opportunity to tee off on the paper, firing off a variety of responses. 

Only about three scholars or groups of scholars seem to reject the idea entirely. One of the teams of commenters includes New York University social psychologist John Jost, who drew considerable political ire in 2003 when he and his colleagues published a synthesis of existing psychological studies on ideology, suggesting that conservatives are characterized by traits such as a need for certainty and an intolerance of ambiguity. Now, writing in Behavioral and Brain Sciences in response to Hibbing roughly a decade later, Jost and fellow scholars note that. Granted, there are still many issues yet to be worked out in the science of ideology. Most of the commentaries on the new Hibbing paper are focused on important but not-paradigm-shifting side issues, such as the question of how conservatives can have a higher negativity bias, and yet not have neurotic personalities. 

Conservatives tend to have a high degree of happiness and life satisfaction. Out of the rubble just might arise a better way of acting in politics that leads to less dysfunction and less gridlockthanks to science. 

Keywords: [“conservative”,”Hibbing”,”scholars”]
Source: https://billmoyers.com/2014/07/17/scientists-are-beginning-to…

Comparing and Contrasting

In some cases, comparison/contrast is only part of the essay-you begin by comparing and/or contrasting two or more things and then use what you’ve learned to construct an argument or evaluation. If you wanted to argue that Frye’s account of oppression is better than both de Beauvoir’s and Bartky’s, comparing and contrasting the main arguments of those three authors might help you construct your evaluation-even though the topic may not have asked for comparison/contrast and the lists of similarities and differences you generate may not appear anywhere in the final draft of your paper. To make a chart, figure out what criteria you want to focus on in comparing the items. If you were writing a paper for a class on typesetting or on how illustrations are used to enhance novels, the typeface and presence or absence of illustrations might be absolutely critical to include in your final paper. Sometimes a particular point of comparison or contrast might be relevant but not terribly revealing or interesting. 

Talking about the different ways nature is depicted or the different aspects of nature that are emphasized might be more interesting and show a more sophisticated understanding of the poems. The thesis of your comparison/contrast paper is very important: it can help you create a focused argument and give your reader a road map so she/he doesn’t get lost in the sea of points you are about to make. If the paper is short, you might be able to fit all of your points about each item into a single paragraph, but it’s more likely that you’d have several paragraphs per item. Using our pizza place comparison/contrast as an example, after the introduction, you might have a paragraph about the ingredients available at Pepper’s, a paragraph about its location, and a paragraph about its ambience. The danger of this subject-by-subject organization is that your paper will simply be a list of points: a certain number of points about one subject, then a certain number of points about another. 

There are two main ways this might play out, depending on how much you have to say about each of the things you are comparing. If you have just a little, you might, in a single paragraph, discuss how a certain point of comparison/contrast relates to all the items you are discussing. 

Keywords: [“might”,”point”,”compare”]
Source: https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/comparing-and-contrasting

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-24-2018

How the racial caste system got restored

Michelle Alexander’s book, The New Jim Crow, is a must-read for anyone trying to come to grips with the explosive growth of America’s prison population in the past three decades-and how this growth relates to the racial disparity in imprisonment. Alexander describes how the two prior systems of racial control, slavery and Jim Crow, functioned to create a racial underclass. Just as the white elite had successfully driven a wedge between poor whites and blacks following Bacon’s Rebellion by creating the institution of black slavery, another racial caste system was emerging nearly two centuries later, in part due to efforts by white elites to decimate a multiracial alliance of poor people. The bulk of The New Jim Crow is an account of how this new system of racial control has been constructed. Often the racial biases in these decisions are less the work of outright bigotry than unconscious racial stereotypes, which, as noted, have been widely promoted by politicians and the media. 

As Alexander documents, a series of Supreme Court rulings have effectively shut the courthouse doors to claims of racial bias in the criminal justice system. The system of mass incarceration is now, for all practical purposes, thoroughly immunized from claims of racial bias. Alexander goes on to show how this system of racial control operates beyond the prison cell as the criminal label follows millions of people of color for the rest of their lives. This officially colorblind system goes a long way in explaining how we have come to this moment in which a Black president can oversee a system that locks up millions of Black men. If the movement that emerges to challenge mass incarceration fails to confront squarely the critical role of race in the basic structure of society, and if it fails to cultivate an ethic of genuine care, compassion, and concern for every human being-of every class, race, and nationality-within our nation’s borders, the collapse of mass incarceration will not mean the death of racial caste in America. 

Inevitably a new system of racialized social control will emerge-one that we cannot foresee just as the current system of mass incarceration was not predicted by anyone thirty years ago. No task is more urgent for racial justice advocates today than ensuring that America’s current racial caste system is its last. 

Keywords: [“racial”,”system”,”drug”]
Source: https://isreview.org/issue/73/how-racial-caste-system-got-restored

SparkNotes: Great Expectations: Themes

The moral theme of Great Expectations is quite simple: affection, loyalty, and conscience are more important than social advancement, wealth, and class. Dickens establishes the theme and shows Pip learning this lesson, largely by exploring ideas of ambition and self-improvement-ideas that quickly become both the thematic center of the novel and the psychological mechanism that encourages much of Pip’s development. At heart, Pip is an idealist; whenever he can conceive of something that is better than what he already has, he immediately desires to obtain the improvement. Ambition and self-improvement take three forms in Great Expectations-moral, social, and educational; these motivate Pip’s best and his worst behavior throughout the novel. Significantly, Pip’s life as a gentleman is no more satisfying-and certainly no more moral-than his previous life as a blacksmith’s apprentice. 

Ultimately, through the examples of Joe, Biddy, and Magwitch, Pip learns that social and educational improvement are irrelevant to one’s real worth and that conscience and affection are to be valued above erudition and social standing. Throughout Great Expectations, Dickens explores the class system of Victorian England, ranging from the most wretched criminals to the poor peasants of the marsh country to the middle class to the very rich. From the handcuffs Joe mends at the smithy to the gallows at the prison in London, the imagery of crime and criminal justice pervades the book, becoming an important symbol of Pip’s inner struggle to reconcile his own inner moral conscience with the institutional justice system. In general, just as social class becomes a superficial standard of value that Pip must learn to look beyond in finding a better way to live his life, the external trappings of the criminal justice system become a superficial standard of morality that Pip must learn to look beyond to trust his inner conscience. Magwitch frightens Pip at first simply because he is a convict, and Pip feels guilty for helping him because he is afraid of the police. 

By the end of the book Pip has discovered Magwitch’s inner nobility, and is able to disregard his external status as a criminal. As Pip has learned to trust his conscience and to value Magwitch’s inner character, he has replaced an external standard of value with an internal one. 

Keywords: [“Pip”,”social”,”class”]
Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/greatex/themes

Normalizing Male Dominance: Gender Representation in 2012 Films

Our analysis looks at films by genres, with some concluding remarks about gender roles and examples of male and female characters that were less objectified and represented gender roles that were more human or outside of the narrow gender roles of most films. Looking at the 53 films in the category of gender representation, we see that the majority of characters were male, and only 7 were female. Women are constantly being misrepresented in these films, shown for purposes of objectification, support of the male characters, and mostly as love interests that drive the male characters. In President Evil and Underworld, the lead females characters are strong and confident, but one is a vampire who is looking for her male partner and the lead female character in Resident Evil is often sexualized by the way she is dressed. We see animated film gender stereotypes here, a young boy being the main character, his dog being male, his role model in the film being a the male science teacher, his mother being overly protective and the villain, of sorts, being the cranky male neighbor/mayor of the town. 

The first three characters that appear on screen are male characters. The main male character Ted, voiced by Zac Efron, lives with his mom and grandmother and does not have a father figure, which is interesting, since in a large number of children films, the maternal character is missing. In Wreck-It Ralph, the relationships between male and female characters are portrayed as much more of a partnership than we see in many other movies, where one, mostly male, character is dominating another, usually female, character. There is the opportunity for the movie to have a stereotypical lesbian character, and it seems like they will head down that path with the character of Sergeant Calhoun; however, she works closely with another male character, Felix and the two become romantically involved. It is a heartwarming film that challenges some gender roles, but in the end Amy Adams character finds another male love interest and plays the role of the female fixer in a dysfunctional family. 

In The Five Year Engagement we see a bit of gender parity, the movie focusing equally on the main male and female characters. In the end, they do switch traditional gender roles, and the main female character proposes to the main male character. 

Keywords: [“character”,”film”,”male”]
Source: https://griid.org/2013/02/12/normalizing-male-dominance-gender…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-23-2018

Inequality, Race, and Remedy

The value of equality, democratic voice, physical and economic security, social mobility, a shared sense of responsibility for one another, and a chance to start over after misfortune or missteps – what many Americans call redemption – are the moral pillars of the American ideal of opportunity. Many Americans of goodwill who want to reduce poverty believe that race is no longer relevant to understanding the problem, or to fashioning solutions for it. In 2000, after a decade of remarkable economic prosperity, the poverty rate among African Americans and Latinos taken together was still 2.6 times greater than that for white Americans. From 2004 to 2005, while the overall number of poor Americans declined by almost 1 million, to 37 million, poverty rates for most communities of color actually increased. An analysis by The Opportunity Agenda and the Poverty & Race Research Action Council found that while the percentage of Americans of all races living in high-poverty neighborhoods declined between 1960 and 2000, the racial gap grew considerably. 

Similar research in California found that Asian American and, especially, Arab American résumés received the least-favorable treatment compared to other groups. In addition to identifying barriers facing African Americans and Latinos, this research found significant levels of discrimination against Asian Americans, and that Native American renters may face the highest discrimination rates of all. In the case of Native Americans, a quarter of whom are poor, our government continues to play a more flagrant role in thwarting pathways out of poverty. High levels of Native American poverty derive not only from a history of wars, forced relocations, and broken treaties by the United States but also from ongoing breaches of trust – like our government’s failure to account for tens of billions of dollars that it was obligated to hold in trust for Native American individuals and families. While the Asian American poverty rate mirrored that of the country as a whole, Southeast Asian communities reflected far higher levels. 

Americans’ complex attitudes and emotions about race are crucial to understanding the public discourse about poverty and the public’s will to address it. In a more detailed analysis of TV newsmagazines in particular, Gilens found a generally unflattering framing of the poor, but the presentation of poor African Americans was more negative still. 

Keywords: [“American”,”poverty”,”poor”]
Source: http://prospect.org/article/inequality-race-and-remedy

The Trouble With Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature

Wilderness fulfills the old romantic project of secularizing Judeo-Christian values so as to make a new cathedral not in some petty human building but in God’s own creation, Nature itself. The trouble with wilderness is that it quietly expresses and reproduces the very values its devotees seek to reject. Only people whose relation to the land was already alienated could hold up wilderness as a model for human life in nature, for the romantic ideology of wilderness leaves precisely nowhere for human beings actually to make their living from the land. To the extent that we celebrate wilderness as the measure with which we judge civilization, we reproduce the dualism that sets humanity and nature at opposite poles. To do so is merely to take to a logical extreme the paradox that was built into wilderness from the beginning: if nature dies because we enter it, then the only way to save nature is to kill ourselves. 

The tautology gives us no way out: if wild nature is the only thing worth saving, and if our mere presence destroys it, then the sole solution to our own unnaturalness, the only way to protect sacred wilderness from profane humanity, would seem to be suicide. From such a starting place, it is hard not to reach the conclusion that the only way human beings can hope to live naturally on earth is to follow the hunter-gatherers back into a wilderness Eden and abandon virtually everything that civilization has given us. Without our quite realizing it, wilderness tends to privilege some parts of nature at the expense of others. Any way of looking at nature that encourages us to believe we are separate from nature-as wilderness tends to do-is likely to reinforce environmentally irresponsible behavior. To the extent that wilderness has served as an important vehicle for articulating deep moral values regarding our obligations and responsibilities to the nonhuman world, I would not want to jettison the contributions it has made to our culture’s ways of thinking about nature. 

The romantic legacy means that wilderness is more a state of mind than a fact of nature, and the state of mind that today most defines wilderness is wonder. If wilderness can do this-if it can help us perceive and respect a nature we had forgotten to recognize as natural-then it will become part of the solution to our environmental dilemmas rather than part of the problem. 

Keywords: [“wilderness”,”nature”,”place”]
Source: http://www.williamcronon.net/writing/Trouble_with_Wilderness_Main.html

The End of Charity: How Christians are to ‘Remember the Poor’

Longenecker’s careful analysis of the ambiguities surrounding Paul’s commitment to the care of the poor is not meant to challenge the general presumption that Paul and the early church in general did not assume that Christians had an obligation to care for the poor. One of the reasons I am intent to address questions surrounding what it means to remember the poor – or, in other terms, why charity is at the heart of Christian living – is I do not think I have adequately dealt with the challenge that Christians must be a community of the poor that cares for the poor. The poor are poor for numerous reasons, but the bottom line is the poor got left out of the development of advanced economies and there is little one can do to rectify that reality. One of the most interesting questions raised by Lupton – a question, as I noted, also explored by Longenecker – is how the poor are identified as well as what makes them poor. To be with the poor means one must first learn to listen to the poor and, by listening, to discover that the poor are not without resources for survival. 

Rather than focusing of individual acts of charity, now Christians tried to imagine social policies that would make the poor no longer poor. There is nothing wrong with thinking it important to be on the right political side, but lost in that way of trying to fulfil our obligation to the poor is how we find in the face of the poor the face of Christ. To listen to the poor is an exercise of great discipline, but such listening surely is what is required if charity is not to become a hatred of the poor for being poor. Of course, listening, being with and working with the poor are not mutually exclusive activities, but I fear we often want to help the poor without getting to know who the poor may be. I suspect we do so, not from some ideology against the poor, but rather I suspect we prefer to do for the poor rather than be with the poor because the poor scare the hell out of us. 

As an alternative, I think as Christians we need to know how to be with the poor in a manner that the gifts that the poor receive do not make impossible friendship between the giver and the recipient. Charity so understood surely has some chance of being with the poor in a manner that avoids the dishonesty and dependency associated with charity aimed at doing something for the poor. 

Keywords: [“poor”,”charity”,”Christian”]
Source: http://www.abc.net.au/religion/articles/2014/02/10/3941760.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-22-2018

Social capital

Contents: introduction social capital for starters types of social capital the decline in social capital some critiques of the bowling alone theses the benefits of social capital social capital in organizations social capital and informal education conclusion – some issues with social capital further reading and references links acknowledgements how to cite this article. Putnam: ‘Whereas physical capital refers to physical objects and human capital refers to the properties of individuals, social capital refers to connections among individuals – social networks and the norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness that arise from them. The World Bank: ‘Social capital refers to the institutions, relationships, and norms that shape the quality and quantity of a society’s social interactions Social capital is not just the sum of the institutions which underpin a society – it is the glue that holds them together’. Whereas physical capital refers to physical objects and human capital refers to the properties of individuals, social capital refers to connections among individuals – social networks and the norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness that arise from them. Those concerned with social capital have looked to the density of social networks that people are involved in; the extent to which they are engaged with others in informal, social activities; and their membership of groups and associations. 

Bridging social capital can generate broader identities and reciprocity, whereas bonding social capital bolsters our narrower selves. Bonding social capital constitutes a kind of sociological superglue, whereas bridging social capital provides a sociological WD-40. Putnam did not really look at linking social capital nor did he come to grips with the implications of different forms of social capital i.e. that ‘different combinations of the three types of social capital will produce different outcomes. Third, much of the main work undertaken around social capital has failed to properly address the gender dimension of social capital. 

Further exploration of social transformations using the notion of social capital within ‘economically advanced democracies’. The Social Capital Gateway maintained by Fabio Sabatini by is the best place to access resources for the study of social capital. The World Bank PovertyNet – Social Capital Homepage: set of pages that outline the concept and the sources of social capital. 

Keywords: [“social”,”capital”,”work”]
Source: http://infed.org/mobi/social-capital

Emerging Market Multinationals: New Giants on the Block

In their book Emerging Markets Rule: Growth Strategies of the New Global Giants, Wharton management professor Mauro Guillén and co-author Esteban García-Canal shine needed light on this new twist in the story, one that has been largely underreported in the mainstream press. Emerging market multinationals are now at the top of markets as varied as household appliances, ready-mix concrete, seamless tubes for oil drilling, regional jets, meat, bread and candy. Harkening to the guerilla tactics first set out in Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, Guillén and García-Canal view highly targeted niche markets as a kind of stealth weapon allowing emerging market upstarts to gain a toehold in the competitive and often more saturated markets of developed countries. The Chinese appliance manufacturer Haier, for example, cracked the American market by catering to the niche market of college students looking for compact refrigerators. New technology, the authors point out, makes serving niche markets more feasible than before: Flexible production systems allow companies to produce small batches and still make a profit. 

Even though a narrow market in just one country may be marginally profitable at best, the numbers turn favorable when serving that same niche across many national markets. The Mexican brewer Modelo, for example, broke into the U.S. market through Corona Extra, its entry into the very specific niche of light import beer – a market segment over which Heineken held a virtual monopoly. To some extent, old-line multinationals were accustomed to simply imposing their will on the market. They allow the market – and not just the market in a macro, impersonal sense, but in the form of the wildly variable and often unpredictable needs and desires of individual customers – to dictate strategy. 

The enthusiastic embrace of niche markets is only one way EMMs have learned to follow the market. Orascom, a telecommunications company based in Egypt, learned early on how to negotiate the tricky politics of its home nation, and was later able to transfer those skills to emerging markets that established multinationals tended to shun. Learning from EMMs. The book’s final chapter is devoted to summarizing the methods by which so many Emerging Market Multinationals have challenged more entrenched firms for global dominance and to discussing how companies seeking to enter world markets might learn from their example. 

Keywords: [“market”,”company”,”EMM”]
Source: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/emerging-market-multinationals…

Socialist Feminism: A Strategy for the Women’s Movement

INTRODUCTION. We have written this paper to express and share with other women ideas for a new strategy for the women’s movement. One is the direction toward new lifestyles within a women’s culture, emphasizing personal liberation and growth, and the relationship of women to women. We are addressing the paper now to women who share our ideas of socialist feminism, whether they are women working in the movement, women who have never been active, women who have dropped out of the movement, or women working in mixed organizations. Through the concept of sisterhood, women have tried to be responsive to the needs of all women rather than a selected few, and to support, criticize and encourage other women rather than competing with them. 

In the realm of women and work, legislation which protected women was of great benefit in easing their burden. Increasing the availability of jobs for women and encouraging talented women to enter the labor force helps employers and strengthens capitalism but at the same time gives women an opportunity to come together physically and unionize as a collective force for change. The socialist feminist strategy aims at realigning power relations through the process of building a base of power for women through a mass movement united around struggling for our self-interest Our goal is to build this movement. Women have come both to feel less isolated through consciousness-raising and to learn that women’s isolation is a social phenomenon We have come to understand more about the incredible problems which women confront in daily life and to respect the solutions we have been forced to make for survival. With the isolation and unorganized state of the women’s movement in a number of areas of the country, many women who might agree with ideas presented here are not presently working as part of the independent women’s movement. 

Many women in mixed organizations who know they are for women’s liberation are caught in the bind of either feeling guilty or hostile to the independent women’s movement. If we can do these things, we should be able to overcome the limitations of the earlier women’s movement and actively recruit women to our movement. CONCLUSION. To summarize, we have argued for a strategy toward building socialism and feminism for this specific time in history when we have strength in our sense of responsibility to women and yet weakness in our isolated situations. 

Keywords: [“women”,”movement”,”power”]
Source: http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/chisocfem.html