J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 08-07-2018

Matthieu Ricard

Sharjah 24: Matthieu Ricard, philosopher and best-selling author of books on happiness and compassion, inaugurated the first day of the World Government Summit 2018 by asking the assembled audience to consider a more compassionate and altruistic approach to daily life for the benefit of society and the world. 3 lessons I learned from the Tibetan monk who works with the Dalai Lama and went viral as ‘the happiest man alive’ Published on January 08, 2018 In Press Reviews. I sat down with Matthieu Ricard, a Tibetan Buddhist monk who found himself famous among the TED Talk set and reluctantly decided to use the spotlight to share teachings. A scientist and a monk compare notes on meditation, therapy, and their effects on the brain. In his writing and in his life, he explores happiness…. Contemplating happiness with Matthieu Ricard Published on July 02, 2017 In Press Reviews. 

Scientific studies have shown that you can train your brain to be more compassionate; and coupling compassion with altruism can generate a positive outlook in individuals and society. French Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard-who used to be a biochemist-has been studying and practicing altruism for many years, and teaches the meditative techniques t…. A Case For Freedom of Expression Based on Altruism Published on March 24, 2017 In Press Reviews. Freedom is clearly a basic need for all living beings. How to be happy, per the Happiest Man in the World Published on March 12, 2017 In Press Reviews. 

He’s been hailed the happiest man in the world. A dialogue between Matthieu Ricard and Elizabeth Kolbert, moderated by Sam Mowe. Scientist, monk, best-selling author, humanitarian-how Matthieu Ricard discovered that caring for others is the only answer. 

Keywords: [“Matthieu”,”Ricard”,”monk”]
Source: http://www.matthieuricard.org/en/articles

Defining Economic Justice and Social Justice

Social justice is the virtue which guides us in creating those organized human interactions we call institutions. Economic justice, which touches the individual person as well as the social order, encompasses the moral principles which guide us in designing our economic institutions. The ultimate purpose of economic justice is to free each person to engage creatively in the unlimited work beyond economics, that of the mind and the spirit. Like every system, economic justice involves input, out-take, and feedback for restoring harmony or balance between input and out-take. Within the system of economic justice as defined by Louis Kelso and Mortimer Adler, there are three essential and interdependent principles: Participative Justice, Distributive Justice, and Social Justice. 

Like the legs of a three-legged stool, if any of these principles is weakened or missing, the system of economic justice will collapse. Through the distributional features of private property within a free and open marketplace, distributive justice becomes automatically linked to participative justice, and incomes become linked to productive contributions. The principle of distributive justice involves the sanctity of property and contracts. Many confuse the distributive principles of justice with those of charity. Distributive justice follows participative justice and breaks down when all persons are not given equal opportunity to acquire and enjoy the fruits of income-producing property. 

Economic harmony results when Participative and Distributive Justice are operating fully for every person within a system or institution. The harmony that results from the operation of social justice is more consistent with the truism that a society that seeks peace must first work for justice. 

Keywords: [“justice”,”Economic”,”Social”]
Source: http://www.cesj.org/learn/definitions/defining-economic-justice-and…

Review: Money, Greed, and God – Acton Institute PowerBlog

The belief that the essence of capitalism is greed is perhaps the biggest myth Jay W. Richards tackles in his new book, Money, Greed, and God: Why Capitalism is the Solution and not the Problem. Richards does however have a skill for tightly honed logical arguments, and he not only is able to defend free markets but tear lethal holes into many of the economic ramblings of the religious left. The overarching strength of Richards work is how he places the free market message into the context of Christian discussions and debate. Richards also provides an argument of sorts through narrative in his book by contrasting his youthful naïveté with his more mature adult self. 

The chapter on greed and capitalism contain some of the most thoughtful and helpful arguments particularly when he discusses the value of the entrepreneur in society. The author grasps and understands the arguments made by those who are hostile to the market and the religious backgrounds they come out of, and this helps his ability to respond. I have heard all of the myths and teachings Richards is so skilled at countering. The religious left will probably ignore this book rather than respond to many of the well thought out and ordered arguments. Richards takes on figures like Ayn Rand, who celebrate selfishness over the defense of the other. 

The moral argument of course characterizes the basis of the Acton Institute’s purpose and mission. The Acton hand print is all over this book of course because Richards penned the book during his tenure at Acton. Even if one is not inclined to believe or rally around the arguments made by Richards it offers a nice balance to much of the economic branding offered up by the popular culture and religious left of late. 

Keywords: [“Richards”,”book”,”argument”]
Source: http://blog.acton.org/archives/10317-review-money-greed-and-god.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *