J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 09-27-2018

Can capitalism be compassionate?

For an individual a concept like Kurtosis would have no meaning. Private ownership allows for exchange between individuals. An objection may be that we are dealing only with numbers, but if those numbers were actually pointing to individuals, and referred to each individuals’ height, then the Quicksort process could still not be compassionate, kind, or just. If I, as an individual, were to choose my own method to sort those individuals’ heights, then I could choose a method that is compassionate or that is not. There is no method, or rules of conduct, that the sickly individual could observe which would at the same time allow him or her to secure food without making it more scarce for others. 

We can consider how individuals seek other individuals to partner with and marry. Most would not object to allowing individuals to choose their own partner, but we would be likely to object if one partner forced another partner to be with them. They were simply pursuing their own individual interests. Many thousands of years ago, the individuals of the human species in their technological infancy could only look at those outside of their immediate family, or perhaps tribe, as competitors for the scarce resources nature chanced to provide. It is only when one human conceives that he or she, or his or her immediate family or tribe, could be better off by exchanging with another individual from an altogether different family or tribe, that compassion can begin to develop between humans outside of immediate families or tribes, because they no longer need to view each other as competitors for scare resources, they’ve developed a new abstract relationship- a relationship of exchange for mutual benefit. 

Individuals who engage in a great deal of trade with one another tend to have strong relationships, and to share similar interests. Those individuals who do not engage in trade with one another have no such mutual interests. 

Keywords: [“Individual”,”partner”,”process”]
Source: https://www.quora.com/Can-capitalism-be-compassionate

The Pursuit of Equal Income Distribution

During the last decades, the great weaknesses of capitalism have flourished. Inequality of income distribution has worsened painfully, the gap between rich and poor widens more and more every day, and just a few lucky entrepreneurs in the world are able to enjoy the capital benefits of the global system. Hunger, poverty, demographic explosion, ageing, and unbridled mass migration, among other factors, have become critical social dilemmas directly related to capitalist deviations, all of which cause us to foresee a chaotic world scenario in the near future. The numbers shown in this article confirm that the world’s economic disparity, instead of diminishing, is increasing at an alarming rate. Since the world economy completely depends on capitalism, this system is still extremely powerful and influential in global decision-making, thus further aggravating economic disparity. 

As it is not possible to avoid the capitalist system, we will make proposals that are feasible for implementing within the current capitalist tendencies in order to alleviate global imbalance. Compassionate Capitalism is an alternative that promotes flexibilization of the system in order to make it more sustainable. It seeks to diminish corporate control over the economy and markets by regaining the State’s economic intervention so that profits are fairly redistributed for the common welfare. The information used for the study is based on the most recent international reports and global circumstances of the topics in question. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 

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Keywords: [“system”,”global”,”world”]
Source: http://journal.julypress.com/index.php/ajsss/article/view/262

The Case For Compassionate Capitalism

The closer we looked at capitalism, the more we found it wanting. To save capitalism from itself, FDR introduced what turned out to be the crucial missing ingredient: compassion. The damage done to the country during the Depression convinced him that unregulated capitalism always favors the rich at the expense of everyone else. So to save capitalism from itself, FDR introduced what turned out to be the crucial missing ingredient: compassion. He knew instinctively that fairness – essential to any functioning democracy – was an alien concept to pure capitalism. 

Compassionate capitalism worked for everyone without busting the federal budget. Under Roosevelt’s compassionate capitalism – even with a Great Depression and a Second World War – the federal budget quickly came right back into balance. By the time Eisenhower was elected, compassionate capitalism was tightly woven into the fabric of American democracy. America’s social safety net was never viewed as the cause of eye-popping deficits until a radical group of political nihilists decided that the best way to kill the compassion in capitalism was to stubbornly refuse to pay for it. The reason compassionate capitalism is still hugely popular – Tea Party extremists notwithstanding – is because it works. 

America’s social safety net was never viewed as the cause of eye-popping deficits until a radical group of political nihilists, led by people like Grover Norquist, decided that the best way to kill the compassion in capitalism was to stubbornly refuse to pay for it – and then blame the resulting deficits on the lie that compassion itself is just too damn expensive. History has repeatedly demonstrated that compassionate capitalism leads to balanced budgets, a robust economy, and a piece of the opportunity pie for every citizen seated at America’s table. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”deficit”,”budget”]
Source: http://www.wbur.org/cognoscenti/2013/03/21/nick-paleologos

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