J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Why Capitalism Needs Conscious Leadership

While those and other frameworks have focused on reinventing capitalism by shifting business strategy, accounting principles and operational standards, a new movement called conscious capitalism offers a holistic approach that puts people and moral conscience at the center of business practices. I recently had the opportunity to learn more about conscious capitalism’s four tenets at the daylong convening HigherPurpose17 hosted by the Conscious Capitalism Bay Area Chapter. More than hearing from inspiring business leaders who provide proof that business can be a force for good, I learned that conscious capitalism doesn’t have to be an oxymoron. Of the framework’s four tenets – higher purpose, conscious leadership, conscious culture and stakeholder orientation – connecting to a higher purpose is perhaps the most pivotal to build an awakened business. It may go without saying that a conscious company is led by conscious leaders. That’s why conscious leadership must be intentional. The first step in achieving conscious leadership is self-awareness. Conscious leaders are able to recognize when and how to let go of fear and ego, and learn to connect with others from a place of compassion and authentic presence. Being able to shift from the ‘drama triangle’ to presence means being a more conscious leader. The self-awareness that comes with conscious leadership duly creates conscious workplace cultures that enable employees to thrive. Those financial returns would not be possible without a strong foundation of conscious leadership. Conscious capitalism aspires to change our current sad business narrative from the inside out.

Keywords: [“conscious”,”business”,”lead”]
Source: https://www.triplepundit.com/…/capitalism-needs-conscious-leadership

Compassionate Capitalism! – Late Night Health Radio

Having gone from rags to riches to rags to riches, all before celebrating his 50th birthday, Dave Meltzer, who is also known as the entrepreneur’s entrepreneur, has enjoyed careers spanning technology, sports marketing, media and entertainment, and publishing. After losing it all in 2008, Dave determined that the missing ingredient in his prior success was gratitude. Today, as the CEO of Sports 1 Marketing, the firm he co-founded with Hall of Fame Quarterback Warren Moon, his weekly all-hands staff meetings focus on four key traits: empathy, accountability, effective communication, and gratitude. In his first best-seller, Connected To Goodness, 2014, Dave reveals his proven principles for success that will bring his readers the same peace and balance he now enjoys in both business and in life. His newest release, Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business, in 2016, which he co-authored with Blaine Bartlett, delves into the flaws of traditional capitalism. Not only do the authors point out the flaws and successes of the world’s main economic driver, they suggest a new way to conduct business. Compassionate Capitalism will change the way you look at business, so the things you look at change! Late Night Health’s Mark Alyn found the discussion with Dave to be inciteful, inspirational, and actionable. By the way, Dave just launched a podcast with Entrepreneur Magazine called “The Playbook.” This podcast focuses on the minds behind sports and sports business. From owners of teams to athletes on the field, this podcast will showcase the innovators and entrepreneurs of sports.

Keywords: [“business”,”Dave”,”sports”]
Source: https://www.latenighthealth.com/compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism! – Late Night Health Radio

Having gone from rags to riches to rags to riches, all before celebrating his 50th birthday, Dave Meltzer, who is also known as the entrepreneur’s entrepreneur, has enjoyed careers spanning technology, sports marketing, media and entertainment, and publishing. After losing it all in 2008, Dave determined that the missing ingredient in his prior success was gratitude. Today, as the CEO of Sports 1 Marketing, the firm he co-founded with Hall of Fame Quarterback Warren Moon, his weekly all-hands staff meetings focus on four key traits: empathy, accountability, effective communication, and gratitude. In his first best-seller, Connected To Goodness, 2014, Dave reveals his proven principles for success that will bring his readers the same peace and balance he now enjoys in both business and in life. His newest release, Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business, in 2016, which he co-authored with Blaine Bartlett, delves into the flaws of traditional capitalism. Not only do the authors point out the flaws and successes of the world’s main economic driver, they suggest a new way to conduct business. Compassionate Capitalism will change the way you look at business, so the things you look at change! Late Night Health’s Mark Alyn found the discussion with Dave to be inciteful, inspirational, and actionable. By the way, Dave just launched a podcast with Entrepreneur Magazine called “The Playbook.” This podcast focuses on the minds behind sports and sports business. From owners of teams to athletes on the field, this podcast will showcase the innovators and entrepreneurs of sports.

Keywords: [“business”,”Dave”,”sports”]
Source: http://www.latenighthealth.com/compassionate-capitalism

Can Capitalism and Compassion Co-Exist?

Maybe it’s because winning in business normally requires a team effort, and I like working in a team setting. What I have learned over the years is that capitalism and compassion can co-exist and that – gasp! – business can be a force for good. I personally know a great many smart and good-hearted business leaders in the Colorado community. Some of the very best people I know are CEOs, business owners, and entrepreneurs. They care about their employees and the people in their communities a great deal. What organization should we support? How can my employees get involved? How much time will this require? Will our involvement send the wrong signal to my employees, shareholders, customers, or partners? Zunesis employees have worked diligently to build homes for hard working families in the Denver community. Each year we do a build day where we all put on hard hats and work together to help construct the home we are sponsoring that year – “The Zunesis home.” This engagement has served as a very practical way for my small business to give back and support our neighbors in our own community. Seeing the lives of hard working families in our community completely changed by having a secure, safe, and stable place that they call home is something that never loses its luster or excitement. Being part of something that transcends success in business and tangibly blesses people in our community has been good for my employees and our business. I’m guessing that many business leaders and CEOs also want to get involved in supporting their communities, but they may not know how to get started.

Keywords: [“business”,”community”,”employees”]
Source: https://www.zunesis.com/blog_capitalism-and-compassion

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

The Future Of America? – More Than Half Of All U.S. Adults Under Age 30 Now Reject Capitalism

More than half of all adults in the United States under the age of 30 say that they do not support capitalism at this point. You might be tempted to dismiss them as “Foolish young people”, but the truth is that they are the future of America. Without a doubt we are moving in that direction, and our young people are going to be cheering every step of the way. The Harvard University survey, which polled young adults between ages 18 and 29, found that 51 percent of respondents do not support capitalism. Could it be possible that young adults were confused by the wording of the survey? For millions upon millions of young adults in America today, Hillary Clinton is not nearly liberal enough for them. Sadly, most of our young people don’t seem to understand how socialism slowly but surely destroys a nation. These days, there is quite a lot of talk about how we need to get America back to the principles that it was founded upon, but the cold, hard reality of the matter is that most of our young people are running in the opposite direction as fast as they can. Americans under the age of 30 are not just becoming more liberal when it comes to economics. Surveys have found that they are more than twice as likely to support gay rights and less than half as likely to regularly attend church as the oldest Americans are. The quality of the education that our young people are receiving is abysmal, but the values that are being imparted to them will last a lifetime. When you allow that much “Programming” into your mind, it is inevitable that it is going to shape your values, and our young people are more “Plugged in” than any of the rest of us.

Keywords: [“young”,”people”,”survey”]
Source: http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/the-future-of-america-more…

More Than Half Of All U.S. Adults Under Age 30 Now Reject Capitalism » Alex Jones’ Infowars: There’s a war on for your mind!

More than half of all adults in the United States under the age of 30 say that they do not support capitalism at this point. You might be tempted to dismiss them as “Foolish young people”, but the truth is that they are the future of America. Without a doubt we are moving in that direction, and our young people are going to be cheering every step of the way. The Harvard University survey, which polled young adults between ages 18 and 29, found that 51 percent of respondents do not support capitalism. Could it be possible that young adults were confused by the wording of the survey? For millions upon millions of young adults in America today, Hillary Clinton is not nearly liberal enough for them. Sadly, most of our young people don’t seem to understand how socialism slowly but surely destroys a nation. These days, there is quite a lot of talk about how we need to get America back to the principles that it was founded upon, but the cold, hard reality of the matter is that most of our young people are running in the opposite direction as fast as they can. Americans under the age of 30 are not just becoming more liberal when it comes to economics. Surveys have found that they are more than twice as likely to support gay rights and less than half as likely to regularly attend church as the oldest Americans are. The quality of the education that our young people are receiving is abysmal, but the values that are being imparted to them will last a lifetime. When you allow that much “Programming” into your mind, it is inevitable that it is going to shape your values, and our young people are more “Plugged in” than any of the rest of us.

Keywords: [“young”,”people”,”survey”]
Source: https://www.infowars.com/the-future-of-america-more-than-half-of…

A friend gave me a copy of a World Development Report from the World Bank that spelled out in detail the problems with childhood diseases. 2.5 billion people worldwide don’t have access to proper sanitation, a problem that contributes to the deaths of 1.5 million children a year. Although aid from the rich world saves a lot of lives, governments habitually underinvest in research and development, especially for the poor. We take a double-pronged approach: Narrow the gap so that advances for the rich world reach the poor world faster, and turn more of the world’s IQ toward devising solutions to problems that only people in the poor world face. I’ve heard some people describe the economy of the future as “Post-corporatist and post-capitalist”-one in which large corporations crumble and all innovation happens from the bottom up. Today all the people who have escaped poverty represent a huge market opportunity-and now companies are flocking to serve them. People often ask me, “What can I do? How can I help?”. Rich-world governments need to maintain or even increase foreign aid, which has saved millions of lives and helped many more people lift themselves out of poverty. Just as important, it’s also bringing the world closer together. Today we can sit at our desks and see people thousands of miles away in real time. It’s getting harder and harder for those of us in the rich world to ignore poverty and suffering, even if it’s happening half a planet away. In the end, that combination-the advances of science together with our emerging global conscience-may be the most powerful tool we have for improving the world.

Keywords: [“World”,”people”,”help”]
Source: https://www.wired.com/2013/11/bill-gates-wired-essay

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Why Intellectuals Hate Capitalism

“Intellectuals have always disdained commerce,” says Whole Foods Market co-founder John Mackey. They “Have always sided with the aristocrats to maintain a society where the businesspeople were kept down.” Having helped create the global grocery chain intellectuals arguably like best, Mackey has evolved into one of capitalism’s most persuasive champions, making the moral, practical, and even spiritual case that free exchange ennobles all who participate. A high-profile critic of the minimum wage, Obamacare, and the regulatory state, Mackey believes that free markets are the best way not only to raise living standards but to create meaning for individuals, communities, and society. Conscious Capitalism, the 2013 book he co-authored with Rajendra Sisodia, lays out a detailed vision for a post-industrial capitalism that addresses spiritual desire as much as physical need. Reason: You believe capitalism is not only the greatest wealth creator but helps poor people get rich. John Mackey: Intellectuals have always disdained commerce. You might say that capitalism was the first time that businesspeople caught a break. Mackey: It’s sort of where people stand in the social hierarchy. Mackey: I don’t know if it’s a psychological switch so much as that they weren’t necessarily grounded in the philosophy of capitalism. They’re attempting to not fall, so they try to rig the game, and we have crony capitalism. Mackey: The impetus behind so many of these types of regulations in the workplace is, in a sense, to shackle business again-to get it back under the control of the intellectuals. It’ll stifle the dynamic creative destruction of capitalism.

Keywords: [“Mackey”,”capitalism”,”Market”]
Source: http://reason.com/archives/2015/10/27/why-intellectuals-hate-capital

Libertarian Quotes

It is easy to be conspicuously “Compassionate” if others are being forced to pay the cost. I think that the people who are always attacking greed would be more consistent with their position if they refused their next salary increase. I don’t see even the most Left-Wing scholar in this country scornfully burning his salary check. In other words, “Greed” simply means that you are trying to relieve the nature given scarcity that man was born with. We haven’t of course reached that point yet; we haven’t reached the point where everybody is burning his salary increases, or salary checks in general. It is in war that the State really comes into its own: swelling in power, in number, in pride, in absolute dominion over the economy and the society. It is not the business of the law to make anyone good or reverent or moral or clean or upright. The great non sequitur committed by defenders of the State, is to leap from the necessity of society to the necessity of the State. ‘ But it is totally irresponsible to have a loud and vociferous opinion on economic subjects while remaining in this state of ignorance. Free-market capitalism is a network of free and voluntary exchanges in which producers work, produce, and exchange their products for the products of others through prices voluntarily arrived at. All of the services commonly thought to require the State – from the coining of money to police protection to the development of law in defense of the rights of person and property – can be and have been supplied far more efficiently and certainly more morally by private persons. The State is in no sense required by the nature of man; quite the contrary.

Keywords: [“State”,”salary”,”economic”]
Source: http://libertarianquotes.net/R/Murray-Rothbard.html

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. While the operation of commodity markets and local trade during the commercial expansion of the 13th century has been explored by economic historians, the operation of the property market has been under-researched in comparison. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Properties were cleared and streets obliterated to create a new site for King’s College Chapel during the 1440s. Profits from property speculation benefitted individuals, family dynasties and the urban community as a whole.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Cambridge”]
Source: http://voxeu.org/article/compassionate-capitalism-middle-ages

Marx and Engels: Scientific Socialism

In the 1840s, Engels and Marx concluded independently that the social order they were living in was doomed. Having served for a year as an officer in the Guards, his father sent him to work in the office of Erman and Engels in Manchester. On the way Engels and Marx met briefly for the first time – but did not like one another. Marx was editing articles about French socialism and communism but. In 1844 Marx lost his job as an editor and went to Paris to edit a journal and study economics and socialism. In Paris Marx received an article from Engels that he described as a work of genius. In Manchester Engels had gathered the materials for a book The Conditions of the Working Class in England, which he wrote after his return to Germany and published, in German, in 1845. In 1842, the year that Engels arrived, English workers, striking for the Charter, roamed the Midlands and North of England setting light to rich men’s houses and pulling out the plugs of factory boilers. Capitalism, Engels argued, was subject to periodic crises, and one of these would be the occasion for the working class wresting power from the capitalists and establishing a communist society. Engels and Marx believed passionately that scientific theory could transform the world if it was linked to the struggles of the working class. In France, a dictator was elected by the people in a popular election! Disappointed, but not defeated, Marx turned his attention to the economic analysis of the foundations of capitalism, and out of this developed his monumental work: Das Kapital. Economics for Marx and Engels was not just economics: it was the explanation for everything.

Keywords: [“work”,”Engels”,”Marx”]
Source: http://www.studymore.org.uk/she12.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Pros and Cons of Capitalism

Contrary to the opinion of some class warriors, the upper strata of Capitalism is not static; individuals and families rise up into it, and fall out of it, every year. Capitalism provides ever-rising standards of living and leisure time for those who work. Capitalism rests on the premise that effective competition is the best way of guiding individual efforts. Capitalism is a system in which the distribution of persons between different occupations stems from their own choices. The history of Capitalism is full of such occurrences, sometimes affecting hundreds of thousands of people at the same time. To appreciate the fantastic results of Capitalism, we must measure it by the hopes men held when it began; and there is no doubt that its success surpassed man’s wildest dreams. Intellectuals sometimes use the freedom afforded by Capitalism to nibble at its very foundations. Capitalism provides motivation to individuals and companies; it distributes responsibilities and rewards; it is a system of prizes and penalties. Capitalism is perfectly fitted to Democracy, in that it features individuals best served by being left alone, rather than those who wish to live off the state. Capitalism does not simply mean that persons may influence production by choosing beans or peas at the grocery; that a young person may choose between a vast array of career paths; that manufacturers may choose what and how they produce. Capitalism is a set of values; it is an attitude toward life; it is a civilization, and yes- it is inarguably a civilization of inequality amongst individuals and families. Unfettered Capitalism produced the incredible wealth one sees in the United States today.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”people”,”free”]
Source: https://soapboxie.com/economy/Capitalism-Definition

John Hawkins’ Right Wing News

1) A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader. 2) I’d rather entrust the government of the United States to the first 400 people listed in the Boston telephone directory than to the faculty of Harvard University. 12) The prudent capitalist will never adventure his capital if there exists a state of uncertainty as to whether the Government will repeal tomorrow what it has enacted today. Curtis LeMay. 18) Compassion is defined not by how many people are on the government dole but by how many people no longer need government assistance. 27) Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best stage, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one. 28) History teaches that war begins when governments believe the price of aggression is cheap. 29) Millions of individuals making their own decisions in the marketplace will always allocate resources better than any centralized government planning process. 31) The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, I’m from the government and I’m here to help. 32) I hope we have once again reminded people that man is not free unless government is limited. There’s a clear cause and effect here that is as neat and predictable as a law of physics: as government expands, liberty contracts. 39) Yet the basic fact remains: every regulation represents a restriction of liberty, every regulation has a cost.

Keywords: [“government”,”people”,”liberty”]
Source: http://rightwingnews.com/top-news/40-classic-conservative-quotes

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Keywords: [“Download”,”pdf”,”premium”]
Source: http://www.dersovi.com/compassionate-capitalism-how-corporations-can-make…

Read This Before You Ever Debate “Capitalism” Again

Capitalism is only the private ownership of the means of production. The simplicity of this definition has given rise to several “Modifier” capitalisms: anarcho-capitalism, compassionate capitalism, crony capitalism, and free market capitalism. A more appealing form of capitalism is compassionate capitalism. Although there is no precise definition of this type of capitalism, the main idea is that, while its proponents like capitalism, they think it can lead to unpleasant excesses. On the left, advocates of a compassionate capitalism grudgingly accept capitalism as necessary and useful. The outcome of both the public-private partnerships of the Bush administration and the social consciousness and corporate responsibility of the Clinton and Obama administrations has been what people are increasingly calling “Crony capitalism.” Under crony capitalism, private owners of the means of production use the coercive power of government to advance their own interests. Another effect of crony capitalism has been the increasing power of the Washington bureaucracy to direct economic activity-undermining capitalism itself. Bringing the simple definition of capitalism into a debate is not enough. I’ve briefly presented anarcho-capitalism, compassionate capitalism, and the resulting crony capitalism. Let me now describe the kind of capitalism I advocate: free market capitalism. Free market capitalism means you should be free to pursue what you believe is good, whether that is building low-income housing, brewing beer in your barn, creating a business, or pursuing a profession. Second, free market capitalism fosters personal responsibility and human dignity.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”capitalist”,”market”]
Source: https://home.isi.org/read-you-ever-debate-capitalism-again

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Author Gunther to Speak on “Compassionate Capitalism”

BUFFALO, N.Y. – Author Marc Gunther will speak on “Compassionate Capitalism: How Corporate America is Changing for the Better” at 7:30 p.m. March 27 in the Screening Room in the Center for the Arts on the University at Buffalo North Campus. Sponsored by the University at Buffalo School of Management and the UB Law School, Gunther’s visit is the second annual event in the Gerald S. Lippes Speaker Series. A senior writer at Fortune magazine and a columnist for CNNMoney.com, Gunther writes about the impact of business on society. He is the author of several books, including “Faith and Fortune: How Compassionate Capitalism is Transforming American Business”. Gunther also has written about CEO Jeff Immelt’s efforts to reshape the values of General Electric, the greening of Wal-Mart, the rise of corporate social responsibility, globalization, the environmental movement, corporate governance, AIDS and gay rights in corporate America. He has appeared on NBC, ABC, PBS, CNN and NPR and speaks at conferences, corporate events and colleges. Gunther is a graduate of Yale University, where he majored in English. Gunther’s talk from 7:30-8:30 p.m. will be followed by a question-and-answer session and a book signing. The Gerald S. Lippes Speaker Series focuses on current issues and topics related to business and finance. The series is part of a larger effort to foster an integrated understanding of the worlds of business and law, and to encourage a collaborative dialogue between business and legal professionals. Funding for the series is provided through the generous support of Gerald S. Lippes.

Keywords: [“Gunther”,”Corporate”,”business”]
Source: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/8411

Capitalism Is Compassionate

All these activities would tend to drive the price of housing down, and cure the housing shortage. If landlords tried to raise the rents in the absence of a housing shortage, they would find it difficult to keep their apartments rented. Even if landlords banded together to raise rents, they would not be able to maintain the rise in the absence of a housing shortage. For the problem of slum housing is not really a problem of slums or of housing at all. Slum housing with all its horrors is not a problem when the inhabitants are people who can afford higher-quality housing, but prefer to live in slum housing because of the money they can save thereby. For proof, consider a law prohibiting the existence of slums, and therefore of slumlords, without making provisions for the slum dwellers in any other way, such as providing decent housing for the poor or an adequate income to buy or rent good housing. Only if the slumlord were the cause of poverty could he be legitimately blamed for the evils of slum housing. The link between government involvement in the housing market and the plight of the slumlord’s public image should be pinpointed. Scatter-site housing projects, “Public” housing and urban renewal projects, and zoning ordinances and building codes, are just a few examples. Compelling “Cadillac housing” can only harm the inhabitants of “Volkswagen housing.” It puts all housing out of the financial reach of the poor. It is the prohibition of low-quality housing by housing codes and the like that causes landlords to leave the field of housing. If landlords cannot make as much profit in supplying housing to the poor as they can in other endeavors, they will leave the field.

Keywords: [“housing”,”slumlord”,”rent”]
Source: https://www.lewrockwell.com/…/capitalism-is-compassionate

How to build a great company

N R Narayana Murthy, Chairman of the Board and Chief Mentor, Infosys Technologies, outlines the key ingredients to building a great company and the role of ‘compassionate capitalism’ in society. By and large, there is tremendous focus on hard work, pride in the company, and loyalty to the company in Asia. This focus exists in the West too, and that’s how they have built great companies. Second, there is a spirit of family in Asian companies. This means working as a team, showing concern for your fellow employees, making sacrifices for each other’s benefit, and identifying with the common cause of the company. We did something similar after 9/11. We were the first Indian company and one of the few in the world outside the United States to contribute to the Firemen’s Fund. Public-private partnerships in developing countries like India are very important because a company cannot prosper on a sustainable basis, unless it makes a difference to the context in which it operates. I don’t know of a single great company that has not had good leaders. Second, we have to create a grand, noble vision which elevates the energy, enthusiasm and self-esteem of everyone in the company while ensuring that everybody sees a benefit in following the vision. Third, a company has to benchmark itself on a global scale in every area including sales, production, human resources, R&D and finance. Fourth, a great company continuously measures and improves the following attributes: meritocracy, fairness, justice, openness, speed, imagination and excellence in execution. Finally, a great company practices an enduring value system, and follows the finest system of corporate governance.

Keywords: [“company”,”great”,”society”]
Source: http://www.rediff.com/money/2005/jan/31spec.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Capitalism Research Papers Help College Students

Order PaperOur Prices Who We Are What We Do Capitalism is inherently competitive and guarantees nothing to those who, for one reason or another, are incapable of competing successfully. Capitalism is inherently competitive and guarantees nothing to those who, for one reason or another, are incapable of competing successfully. One way to approach capitalism in a research paper is to illustrate that capitalism is exploitative in that it forces people to be “Competitive” rather than “Cooperative”. Capitalism, because it is inherently competitive, creates a situation in which businesses either grow or die. The world of work in a modern corporation is frequently a kind of pressure cooker for capitalism and the worker. In your research paper, you should use Marxist concepts even though you may not be a believer in the Marxist system taken as a whole. One longs for a kind of economic “Peaceable kingdom”; such cannot exist under an economic system in which competition plays such a large role as it does in capitalism. A research paper on capitalism from the political science standpoint shows that there would be a lot less of it if the competitive pressures that are an inevitable part of capitalist systems were not at work. Capitalism is known as a system where private owners control every aspect of an industry in order to make profits for their own interests. For the most part, capitalism can be viewed as complex system based on inequality and monopoly. In the economy that exists today, capitalism would not be beneficial since it would allow a free market to gain the power of monopoly. Although there are blends of capitalism that exist all over the world, it may not be the best system for the United States.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”competitive”]
Source: https://www.papermasters.com/capitalism.html

Is Capitalism the Problem? –

His concern is that the book misdiagnoses our modern problem by not going straight to the root of the problem – capitalism. To get results, he claims, one must have the courage to reject capitalism in all its forms. Capitalism is a spiritual problem that embodies materialism, scientific utopianism, and libertarianism. He affirms that a careful reading of Saint Thomas and papal encyclicals over the last century warns us about the materialism of our days that has its origins in capitalism. I would disagree that we should call the cause of these errors “Capitalism” for three reasons. Many simply equate capitalism with a market economy which has always been defended by the Church. Because of the term’s misuses, it is wiser to follow the advice of Jesuit economist Fr. Bernard Dempsey, who claims that capitalism is a word incapable of scientific definition, and one that should only be used with great reluctance and care, commenting: “Only a very foolish general accepts battle on the terrain of his adversary’s choice.”1. The Church has often spoken out against the abuses of “Capitalism” such as materialism, individualism and scientific utopianism. It has never roundly condemned “Capitalism” as such, lest it condemn inadvertently the market economy and other legitimate ways of conducting business. There is another reason why I do not use the ambiguous term “Capitalism.” It is the term of choice of the Church’s enemies. The Church cannot make common cause with those who hate and actively work to destroy Her. Finally, the last reason why I do not use the word “Capitalism” as the cause for the present ills is because it cannot be the root cause of any moral decay.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”cause”,”term”]
Source: http://www.returntoorder.org/2013/09/capitalism-problem

‘Rosenwald’ doc will reaffirm your faith in the American dream

The superbly wrought documentary “Rosenwald” should be mandatory viewing for all Illinois residents, especially Chicagoans. A big chunk of “Rosenwald” reports the story of how the son of a Jewish peddler became the owner of the vast Sears and Roebuck empire in Chicago, and how he invested his vast fortunes not in stocks, bonds or foreign companies, but in his own nation’s future. The last part of “Rosenwald” steps away from a straight biography and delves into the social, economic, political, educational and cultural ripple effects of this man’s expansive, committed philanthropy. If this didn’t really happen, you might think the story was some fabricated Santa Claus fantasy. Filmmaker Aviva Kempner profiles high school dropout Julius Rosenwald, who, influenced by writer Booker T. Washington, used his vast resources as president of Sears to fulfill his Jewish beliefs of tzedakah and tikkun olam to improve life. He set out to equalize the playing fields of everyday life. During the Jim Crow South, he built more than 5,300 schools. He awarded grants to hundreds and hundreds of African American intellectuals and artists. The German-born Kempner – most known for her doc “The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg” – constructs a remarkably engaging report filled with archival footage, strong images, comic relief but without shying away from the darker moments in which the KKK burned down many of Rosenwald’s schools. “Rosenwald” will reaffirm your faith in capitalism, compassion, community, diversity, social justice and the American dream. “Rosenwald” opens at the Century Centre in Chicago and the Highland Park Renaissance Place. Dann Gire’s Reel Life column runs Friday in Time out!

Keywords: [“Rosenwald”,”life”,”school”]
Source: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20150903/entlife/150909727

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

How to achieve a more compassionate capitalism: look back to medieval Cambridge

Legal advances created a lively property market; cutting-edge technologies improved water management and bridge-building; commodity trade expanded; and towns grew dramatically, both in number and size. Its focus was on local infrastructure and local wellbeing. City churches were financed by local people to meet the needs of local people. Their legacy remains with us today: the most valuable real estate in a modern city is often occupied by medieval churches and hospitals. Using recently discovered documents and novel statistical techniques, we have analysed the histories of over one thousand properties in medieval Cambridge over this period. Using evidence from the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279 – we show how wealth accumulated by successful businesses was recycled back into the community through support for local churches and hospitals and for itinerant preachers based in the town. Town government was devolved by the king and queen to the mayor and bailiffs, and they encouraged the development of guilds, which promoted cooperation. The business centre of Cambridge shifted south as the town expanded. ‘New wealth’ replaced ‘old wealth’ as a local commercial class replaced Norman aristocrats. Local pride and religious devotion – expressed through high levels of charitable giving – helped spread the economic benefits throughout the town community. This self-sustaining system was broken in the 1340s by the Black Death, the outbreak of the Hundred Years War and the punitive levels of taxation imposed on towns thereafter. When prosperity returned in the Tudor period, a more ruthless form of capitalism took root, and it is this ruthless form of capitalism whose legacy remains with us today.

Keywords: [“local”,”town”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://ehsthelongrun.net/2017/03/27/how-to-achieve-a-more…

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. “When we would go on home service and speak to churches, I would bring baskets and wall hangings and knit things that the ladies made,” she says. “I did really well at selling because I told them I know the people who made this-and it’s keeping their families alive.” In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers.

Keywords: [“work”,”made”,”Church”]
Source: http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

Could Capitalism Actually Breed Compassion?

We benefit from the compassion of capitalism and we must help others achieve the same blessings. Google defines compassion as “Sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.” How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. We must be able to have sympathy for and identify with the sufferings of others in order to solve problems and serve others. Sympathy and concern for others form the bedrock of free-market exchange. Entrepreneurs play a vital role in identifying the misfortunes of others, putting themselves in others’ shoes, to really experience what they are going through. In a free society, men like Henry Turkel can take their natural sympathies toward others and aid them in their misfortune. Through his profession, he had many occasions to understand the needs of infants and others who are incapacitated and cannot feed themselves. If not for Dr. Turkel’s sympathy, understanding of suffering, and the incentives to do something about it, my Bailey Grace may not be where she is today. This type of innovation, Turkel’s invention, is encouraged when one lives in a capitalist system, which can breed compassion even among the greedy and selfish. It does encourage ordinary people to unleash their God-given creativity to identify the sufferings of others and eliminate them.

Keywords: [“other”,”Turkel”,”suffering”]
Source: https://tifwe.org/could-capitalism-actually-breed-compassion

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Compassionate capitalism

The Indian stock market has always had a love-hate relationship with Indian politicians. Finance minister P Chidambaram famously remarked many years ago that he was more concerned with what happens in Khan market than in the Bombay stock market. So are Chidambaram and Abdullah right? Is the stock market irrelevant to the aam admi? To be fair, Chidambaram, since his Khan market-stock market remark, has changed his outlook on the Sensex. Aren’t the majority of Indians-nearly 70 per cent-who live in villages left out of the benefits delivered by the stock market boom and even high GDP growth? Well, they are in the short term-and inevitably so. As these companies seek markets beyond the saturated urban metros, they will move into villages, building roads, power plants, factories, water sanitation units, IT centres and infrastructure. That is the classical mode of development in a free market system which India embraced in July 1991. Free market capitalism need not be paternalistic nor exploitative. Since 1991, our economy has grown at an average of over seven per cent a year, thanks entirely to a relatively open, liberalised economy. So even India’s nascent free market economy has had a real impact on people’s lives, including the rural poor. Imagine how much greater that impact would be if a GDP growth rate of eight per cent a year could be sustained for the next 15 years? In short, free markets are the best guarantors for reducing poverty and human misery and eventually creating an egalitarian society. The economy and the stock market are closely intertwined, complementing each other to everyone’s benefit. Many still believe, despite the economic example of “Communist” China, that a free market is simply not a fair market.

Keywords: [“market”,”economy”,”Indian”]
Source: http://www.dnaindia.com/analysis/comment-compassionate-capitalism-1007730

Poll: 51% of Millennials Reject Capitalism

According to a Harvard University poll, 51 percent of young adults between 18-29 reject capitalism, while only 42 percent support it. In the same poll, only 33 percent said they support socialism, according to The Washington Post. One of the pollsters explained the numbers and why “Capitalism” has become a dirty word to the younger generation. “The word ‘capitalism’ doesn’t mean what it used to,” said Zach Lustbader, a senior at Harvard involved in conducting the poll, which was published Monday. For those who grew up during the Cold War, capitalism meant freedom from the Soviet Union and other totalitarian regimes. For those who grew up more recently, capitalism has meant a financial crisis from which the global economy still hasn’t completely recovered. It is an open question whether young people’s attitudes on socialism and capitalism show that they are rejecting free markets as a matter of principle or whether those views are simply an expression of broader frustrations with an economy in which household incomes have been declining for 15 years. Even though these millennials aren’t as quick to claim the term “Socialist” in this poll, they are demanding some of its better perks, like many who want health insurance for all, food and shelter given to those who can’t afford it, and more government involvement all around. To this group, capitalism is viewed as “Unfair” and “Greedy,” while socialism is viewed as “Compassionate.” These poll numbers are about as surprising as knowing this same group largely throw its support towards “Democratic socialist” Bernie Sanders. The Freedom Center is a 501c3 non-profit organization. Therefore we do not endorse political candidates either in primary or general elections.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”poll”,”support”]
Source: https://www.truthrevolt.org/news/poll-51-millennials-reject-capitalism

Conscious Capitalist Credo – Conscious Capitalism

We believe that business is good because it creates value, it is ethical because it is based on voluntary exchange, it is noble because it can elevate our existence, and it is heroic because it lifts people out of poverty and creates prosperity. Free enterprise capitalism is the most powerful system for social cooperation and human progress ever conceived. It is one of the most compelling ideas we humans have ever had. But we can aspire to even more. Conscious Capitalism is a way of thinking about capitalism and business that better reflects where we are in the human journey, the state of our world today, and the innate potential of business to make a positive impact on the world. Conscious businesses are galvanized by higher purposes that serve, align, and integrate the interests of all their major stakeholders. Their higher state of consciousness makes visible to them the interdependencies that exist across all stakeholders, allowing them to discover and harvest synergies from situations that otherwise seem replete with trade-offs. They have conscious leaders who are driven by service to the company’s purpose, all the people the business touches, and the planet we all share together. Conscious businesses have trusting, authentic, innovative and caring cultures that make working there a source of both personal growth and professional fulfillment. They endeavor to create financial, intellectual, social, cultural, emotional, spiritual, physical and ecological wealth for all their stakeholders. Conscious businesses will help evolve our world so that billions of people can flourish, leading lives infused with passion, purpose, love and creativity; a world of freedom, harmony, prosperity, and compassion.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”business”,”world”]
Source: https://www.consciouscapitalism.org/about/credo

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Blaine Bartlett�s, �Compassionate Capitalism�

Best Seller Publishing announces the release of Blaine Bartletts new book, Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business. It will be available for free download in the Amazon Kindle Store on July 11th. Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. From our perspective, business is nothing less than a spiritual discipline, it requires the same integrity, commitment, intentionality, courage, discipline, and compassion as any other spiritual discipline. Spiritual disciplines honor life, in all its forms, as having innate and intrinsic value simply because it exists. Its the honoring of this valuethe ennobling of this valuethat is called forth when we approach business as a spiritual undertaking. Compassionate Capitalism by Blaine Bartlett will be free and available for download on Amazon for 5 days at: https://www. Like it or not, approve of it or not, buy in to it or not — in this day and age it is business that is the greatest sculpting force of our cultural landscape. The reason this book is so important is that it will take the legacy story of business and capitalism and use it as a solid foundation to build on as we look to the future to accelerate the paradigm shift. Best Seller Publishing is a Los Angeles Publishing Company dedicated to helping business owners and entrepreneurs become the hunted with their best-selling books.

Keywords: [“Business”,”book”,”spiritual”]
Source: https://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=204203

Library of free ebooks. Lots of different categorys containing free ebooks

Download. Download Easy Vietnamese Style Cookery: Australian Women’s Weekly Home Library ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Beckett and Zen: A Study of Dilemma in the Novels of Samuel Beckett ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Guide to Independent Living for People with Arthritis ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Little Nippers – Festivals: Pack A ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Early Medieval Scotland: Individuals, Communities and Ideas ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The Jaguar XK Series ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The Main Event ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Diary and Correspondence of Samuel Pepys from His MS. Cypher in the Pepsyian Library, Volume I – Scholar’s Choice Edition ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Potatoes, Sweet and Irish: Storey’s Country Wisdom Bulletin A-04 ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Brazil ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Total Productive Maintenance: Strategies and Implementation Guide ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Insomnia Cures: Sleep Hygiene Practice Makes Permanent ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below.

Keywords: [“Download”,”pdf”,”click”]
Source: http://www.nlsanimalhealth.com/compassionate/compassionate-capitalism…

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Workers get paid wages, so it doesn’t seem as if they are working for free. Even if Cohen is wrong, and individual workers are forced to sell their labor power, notice that it does not yet follow that workers are exploited. Under feudalism, serfs spent part of their working time working in their own fields and the rest working in their lord’s fields. A great deal of their work was wholly unpaid: a fact that was very obvious to all involved, given the physical separation between paid work and unpaid work. Workers spend the first part of their working day working, in effect, for themselves. Under capitalism, the worker’s surplus is appropriated by the capitalist; under socialism, the worker’s surplus is appropriated by society. Saddled with “Alienating” jobs like these, workers work merely to live; as Marx writes, they “Feel themselves at home only when they are not working, and when they are working they do not feel at home”. Workers, so treated, expend little effort at work, ignore orders, under-report their productive capabilities, over-report their output, and so on. Parecon proposes to radically remake the division of labor by creating “Balanced job complexes” in which “The combination of tasks and responsibilities each worker has would accord them the same empowerment and quality of life benefits as the combination every other worker has”. The result is a division of labor that assigns routine, boring, disempowering work to the many, while reserving varied, complex, empowering work for the privileged few. Worker self-management: “Each productive enterprise is controlled by those who work there”. Rigorous, subtle work that mounts a qualified case for socialism using tools of contemporary moral and political philosophy.

Keywords: [“socialist”,”Socialism”,”capitalism”]
Source: http://www.iep.utm.edu/socialis

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Conscious Capitalism

Conscious Capitalism builds on the foundations of Capitalism – voluntary exchange, entrepreneurship, competition, freedom to trade and the rule of law. These are essential to a healthy functioning economy, as are other elements of Conscious Capitalism including trust, compassion, collaboration and value creation. Research published in the book Firms of Endearment: How World Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose, found companies adhering to the principles of Conscious Capitalism outperformed the market financially over all measured time periods from 3 to 15 years. In addition to financial wealth these companies create many other kinds of societal wealth: fulfilled employees, happy and loyal customers, innovative and profitable suppliers, thriving and environmentally healthy communities and more. The Conscious Capitalism movement includes numerous CEOs and thought leaders globally. To fulfil its purpose and mission, and to respond to increasing demand for information, support and collaboration, Conscious Capitalism, Inc. empowers a global network of U.S. and International Chapters to run events and through presentations, publications and social media. The Australian Chapter currently has communities in Sydney, Melbourne, and Perth and in 2016 merged with New Zealand. Conscious Capitalism Australia & New Zealand is a non-for-profit organisation dedicated to the cultivation of the theory and practice of Conscious Capitalism and serving as communities of inquiry and practice for business leaders, entrepreneurs, coaches and consultants and others. Driven by members, for members, we aim to co-create a thriving ecosystem of conscious businesses that serve, lead and advocate the greater good.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”Capitalism”,”lead”]
Source: http://purpose.do/partners/conscious-capitalism

Conscious Capitalism Australia & New Zealand

Conscious Capitalism builds on the foundations of Capitalism – voluntary exchange, entrepreneurship, competition, freedom to trade and the rule of law. These are essential to a healthy functioning economy, as are other elements of Conscious Capitalism including trust, compassion, collaboration and value creation. Research published in the book Firms of Endearment: How World Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose, found companies adhering to the principles of Conscious Capitalism outperformed the market financially over all measured time periods from 3 to 15 years. In addition to financial wealth these companies create many other kinds of societal wealth: fulfilled employees, happy and loyal customers, innovative and profitable suppliers, thriving and environmentally healthy communities and more. The Conscious Capitalism movement includes numerous CEOs and thought leaders globally. To fulfil its purpose and mission, and to respond to increasing demand for information, support and collaboration, Conscious Capitalism, Inc. empowers a global network of U.S. and International Chapters to run events and through presentations, publications and social media. The Australian Chapter currently has communities in Sydney, Melbourne, and Perth and in 2016 merged with New Zealand. Conscious Capitalism Australia & New Zealand is a non-for-profit organization dedicated to the cultivation of the theory and practice of Conscious Capitalism and serving as communities of inquiry and practice for business leaders, entrepreneurs, coaches and consultants and others. Driven by members, for members, we aim to co-create a thriving ecosystem of conscious businesses that serve, lead and advocate the greater good.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”Capitalism”,”lead”]
Source: https://consciouscapitalism.org.au/about

Is “Capitalism” a Dirty Word and “Liberal” a Good Word?

For what it’s worth, the Princess of the Levant even says capitalism is “a sexy word.” A narrow majority of respondents in Harvard’s poll said they did not support capitalism. Writing for Mic, Marie Solis looks at these recent poll numbers and wonders if the real issue is whether “Capitalism” is simply an unpalatable word. The results may be more indicative of a shifting connotation for the word “Capitalism” itself. “The word ‘capitalism’ doesn’t mean what it used to,” he said. Maybe one problem here is the word “Capitalism” and what it evokes in the aftermath of the Great Recession and Wall Street bailout. Maybe “Capitalism” really isn’t the right word for the free enterprise system, the deep magic that has made America the richest, most powerful nation on Earth. We certainly need to consider whether and how the word can be reclaimed, or if we’re better served talking about the “Market economy,” “Private enterprise,” “Free trade,” or “Entrepreneurship.” Millennials love the word entrepreneur Unlike anti-capitalists of yore, young people today don’t seem to see a tension between turning a profit and living righteously. As John Della Volpe, polling director at Harvard, puts it, millennials aren’t “Rejecting the concept” of capitalism. If we can convince more people to support good policy by talking about “Free markets” rather than “Capitalism,” then I have no objection to using a more effective phrase or word. Now that we’ve discussed whether “Capitalism” is a bad word, let’s shift gears and look at whether “Liberal” should be a good word. Given the way the meaning of the word has changed over time, I don’t think it would make sense to the average person if I referred to myself as “Liberal.”

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”Liberal”,”word”]
Source: https://danieljmitchell.wordpress.com/2016/04/30/is-capitalism-a…

America the generous

Capitalism has its critics, but when disaster strikes, the world still turns to America, he says. Bennett: American generosity is not dependent on the government or public policy. Canadian radio commentator Gordon Sinclair said in the 1970s, at the height of American criticism abroad, that the United States is the “Most generous and possibly the least appreciated people on all the Earth.” We are still the most generous people in the world today. Often the benefactors of American generosity capture it best. The critics of the American capitalist system are many, but when disaster strikes, the world still turns to America. Generations of Americans have sacrificed their lives to fight and die for freedom around the world. As for individuals, a new American Red Cross poll suggests that while Americans had to tighten their budgets in 2011, they are still as committed to giving to charity as ever. American generosity is not dependent on the government or public policy. Compared to the rest of the world, American benevolence is unmatched. China, which boasts the second largest economy in the world, is one of the least generous nations on Earth when it comes to charitable contributions. In the annals of human history, there has never been a country as compassionate and generous as the United States. When Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, the great Russian novelist who defied communism, visited America, he said, “The United States has long shown itself to be the most magnanimous, the most generous country in the world. Wherever there is a flood, an earthquake, a fire, a natural disaster, an epidemic, who is the first to help? The United States. Who helps the most and unselfishly? The United States.”

Keywords: [“American”,”world”,”States”]
Source: http://www.cnn.com/2011/12/15/opinion/bennett-generosity/index.html