J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-20-2018

�Compassionate Capitalism,� An Amazon Best-Selling Book is Free For One More Day

Best Seller Publishing announces the release of Blaine Bartletts new book, Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business. It will be available for free download in the Amazon Kindle Store for one more day on July 15th. Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. 

The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. From our perspective, business is nothing less than a spiritual discipline, it requires the same integrity, commitment, intentionality, courage, discipline, and compassion as any other spiritual discipline. Compassionate Capitalism by Blaine Bartlett will be free and available for download on Amazon for 1 more day at: https://www. Compassionate Capitalism was an extremely beneficial read and a reminder that business isnt solely about the profits. Every aspect of our life today evolves around business, and so often people tend to lose sight of their goals and aspirations. 

Overall, there are many takeaways and I highly recommend reading it! Jeffrey RovnerCorporate America has made business turn for the worse. This book captures the idea that you can put the customer first and still find the resources necessary to have a successful business. Best Seller Publishing is a Los Angeles Publishing Company dedicated to helping business owners and entrepreneurs become the hunted with their best-selling books. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”book”,”today”]
Source: https://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=204205

Compassion, Christianity or Consumerism? The True Meaning of Christmas

As a result, we have lost sight of the true meaning of Christmas, and celebrate it in ways that are in direct opposition to its original intent. This year, on Black Friday, I was reminded about the true meaning of Christmas. Black Friday has become as much a part of the holiday season in the United States as Thanksgiving and Christmas. 33 million evergreen conifers are purchased each year, at around $35 each, for a market of $1.16 billion in Christmas tree sales. This is not suggesting to abolish Christmas altogether, but if every U.S. household reduced their Christmas budget by only thirty-percent and contributed that money to impoverished communities, we would meet the forecast amount to end world hunger. 

This tale of Christmas we share is a stark contrast to the true story of St. Nicholas. Today, Christmas is a celebration that revolves around fulfilling greed, not need, at the expense of the poor. The real genius-work behind this big façade is the connection between Christmas and Christianity. Christmas marks the return of the sun after the winter solstice – the resurrection of light and the perseverance of unconditional love which nature manifests each year in the new life and returning warmth of springtime, from the desolate depths of winter. 

He saw the true meaning of Christmas and put an end to the charade. While his means were extreme, by stealing all the presents he learned that the real meaning of Christmas had nothing to do with exchanging gifts, but exchanging love. Let’s each of us be that Grinch, and take consumerism out of the Christmas mythology. 

Keywords: [“Christmas”,”year”,”love”]
Source: http://www.wakingtimes.com/2015/12/20/compassion-christianity-consumerism…

Capitalism’s stormy sea

Capitalism as a total world system is a relatively new part of human experience. By these measures capitalism is merely the blink of an eye. Economy was, as the social theorist Karl Polanyi has so brilliantly analysed, ‘socially embedded’ in such societies and subject to the prevailing values of that particular society rather than the kind of all-determining external force it has become under capitalism. Those who want to transform or even just tinker with our current system of corporate capitalism are confronted with a formidable task. One of the features of capitalism that has enabled it to survive is its ability both to create and to take advantage of its economic crises. 

Schumpeter saw this underlying attribute as a kind of positive resilience that keeps capitalism from collapsing under the weight of its own contradictions. Capitalism constantly puts these things at risk in its restless search for new avenues of profitable growth. Not only has capitalism shown great resilience in overcoming the periodic crises it has faced but it has also even been embraced by its one-time ideological opponents: state socialism in China and the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Our current phase of capitalism is underpinned by a much named but too little understood political philosophy called neoliberalism. Usually this is a phrase used by critics rather than proponents of capitalism. 

Under earlier forms of liberal democracy these could be counted on to play a moderately autonomous role in tempering capitalism. This makes for difficult terrain on which alternatives to capitalism must be built. 

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”political”,”become”]
Source: https://digital.newint.com.au/issues/102/articles/2344

We Need Sustainable Capitalism

What is clear to us and many others is that market capitalism has arrived at a critical juncture. The financial crisis has reinforced our view that sustainable development will be the primary driver of economic and industrial change over the next 25 years. At the Harvard Business School Centennial Global Business Summit held earlier this month, the future of market capitalism was one of the principal themes discussed. We founded Generation Investment Management in 2004 to develop a new philosophy of investment management and business more broadly. Our approach is based on the long-term, and on the explicit recognition that sustainability issues are central to business and should be incorporated in the analysis of business and management quality. 

While certainly not a complete list, the causes of the current financial crisis include: short-termism, poor governance and regulation, misaligned compensation and incentive systems, lack of transparency, and in some firms, poor leadership and a dysfunctional business culture. Forty years ago, Robert F. Kennedy reminded Americans that the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Gross National Product measure neither our national spirit nor our national achievement. Business – and by extension the capital markets – need to change. Such investments ignore the reality of the climate crisis and its consequences for business. 

Business and markets cannot operate in isolation from society or the environment. Business and the capital markets are best positioned to address these issues. We need a more long-term and responsible form of capitalism. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”market”,”National”]
Source: https://algore.com/news/we-need-sustainable-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-14-2018

Competitive Enterprise Institute

It’s much more fashionable to attack Adam Smith these days than to read him. Yes, he favored economic liberalism, which wasn’t exactly in style in his time. There are two main drivers behind Smithian liberalism, neither of them cold or calculating. The foundation of Smith’s moral theory is the impartial spectator theory. Smith is well known for being an ardent free trader. 

The second driver of Smith’s brand of market capitalism is compassion for the poor. Liberalism properly understood – free markets, free trade, free migration, etc. Creates more wealth more quickly than any other economic system. In Smith’s time, the average person worldwide made around $3 per day. Today, in countries that have embraced liberalism, you can make $100 a day and consider yourself middle class. 

Rejecting liberalism means forcing the poor to miss out on the Great Fact. Smith favored liberalism because it is not only moral, it makes life better for the poor. 

Keywords: [“liberalism”,”Smith”,”trade”]
Source: https://cei.org/blog/compassion-adam-smith

Compassionate Capitalism: People Helping People Help Themselves

A plan that has made him one of America’s richest men, and that has made Amway one of the great corporate success stories of our time. Compassionate Capitalism spells out clearly and eloquently the guiding principles and concrete steps to making your life and your world better. Rich DeVos shows how your energy, your ambition, and your spirit of enterprise can travel together down a path in which the spirit of capitalism and moral values inextricably merge. Interweaving his own amazing story with vivid personal histories of men and women around the world, Rich DeVos illustrates both how success is achieved and what it truly means. He demonstrates that compassionate capitalism is the only solution to the most crucial issues of our time, and to the many other challenges that face us in the closing decade of this century and in the beginning of the next. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”DeVos”,”Rich”]
Source: https://books.google.com/books/about/Compassionate_Capitalism.html?id=dvTfTnnjxOsC

Buy Compassionate Capitalism Book Online at Low Prices in India

There are lots of wealthy people out there but most aren’t truly happy. This is largely because they aren’t fulfilling a higher purpose with their businesses, they’re simply out there trying to survive in the often cutthroat business world. Contrary to a lot of advice you may have heard out there on how to successfully build a prosperous business, DeVos claims that integrating compassion for your fellow man with lucrative opportunities is the real secret to security and happiness. It’s the knowledge that what you’re doing is making a difference that makes you feel worthy of the privilege and comfort of wealth. Even before the wealth comes, having a compassionate attitude along with sound business acumen goes a long way towards increasing your chances of attaining wealth and influence. 

A great book written in a language anyone can understand. 

Keywords: [“business”,”wealth”,”out”]
Source: https://www.amazon.in/Compassionate-Capitalism-Rich-DeVos/dp/0452270510

Entrepreneurs + Investors + Funded Innovation + Generational Wealth + Compassionate Capitalism

History has shown that the Greatest Wealth is Created through Entrepreneurism. Every Innovation that improves our lives came from an Entrepreneur with an idea; a strategy to succeed; and the funding to execute. The Good News: You don’t have to start a great company when you can invest in a great company and reap the same rewards as the founders. Recent regulatory changes have made that easier than ever to happen. We help Entrepreneurs and Investors create their legacy in the innovation they bring to market and the generational wealth they create. 

The men and women who take the road less traveled and invest in exciting private companies before they go public, have the opportunity that few realize – create wealth, leave a legacy of innovation, and have personal pride in knowing they impacted their community with new jobs and opportunities. 

Keywords: [“create”,”company”,”Innovation”]
Source: https://www.karenrands.co/

National Network of Angel Investors

All of these terms are buzz words for a simple concept. Investing in a small business when they are still private and have tremendous growth potential, so that the value of that stock creates a multiple on your money when they get sold or go public. The National Network of Angel Investors is the 4th generation of an angel investor group started in 1994, the Network of Business Acquirers and Investors. It is made up of angel groups that are forming all over the United States for a singular purpose – to have a direct impact on growing their wealth while increasing the jobs in the market and funding innovation. When you are ready to start angel investing, you’ll gain exclusive access to screened and vetted entrepreneurial endeavors with tremendous potential. 

Keywords: [“Angel”,”investor”,”start”]
Source: http://nationalnetworkofangelinvestors.com/

Why Pope Francis wants us to stop worshipping capitalism

Pope Francis’ upcoming visit to the U.S. next week is generating huge interest and expectation. Part of that excitement is rooted in the different tone the pope has taken on a number of issues, from marriage to the role of women in the church. He has also issued a tough critique of capitalism and called for more action on climate change. We kick off our coverage of the pope’s trip, which will continue all next week, with a look at those issues from our economics correspondent Paul Solman. 

It’s part of our weekly series Making Sense, which airs every Thursday on the NewsHour. 

Keywords: [“issues”,”Pope”,”Part”]
Source: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/pope-francis-wants-us-stop-worshipping-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-12-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – by Sanjiv Mehta at the #India2022Exchange

Sage launches Sage Foundation to lead social philanthropy

Sage’s 2+2+2 community model sets benchmark for FTSE 100 companies. Sage today launches the Sage Foundation which sets the standard for Corporate Compassionate Capitalism around the world. Each of Sage’s 14,000 employees will be able to contribute five days per year in work time to volunteer with any non-profit organization they elect to support. The Sage Foundation will also give grants to create entrepreneurial opportunities for the young and disadvantaged within communities, as well as grants to match employee charitable donations and fundraising. The Sage Foundation has created a model of ‘2+2+2’: donating 2% of employee time each year, 2% of free cash flow* and 2 of Sage’s smart technology products for any charity, social enterprise or non-profit organization. 

This model demonstrates Sage’s commitment to philanthropic leadership in the FTSE 100. Driven by Sage’s ambition to connect its customers, colleagues and communities within an integrated model, the Sage Foundation will be open for business globally from 1st October 2015. With tens of thousands of non-profit organizations as existing Sage customers, the Sage Foundation will enhance Sage’s relationship with charity and social enterprise. Non-profit organizations will be able to apply for donated Sage One, Sage Life or X3 products, through the newly created Donation program. The Sage Foundation will benefit from Sage revenues from the non-profit sector; notionally ‘2%’ of free cash flow is equivalent to revenue gained from non-profit sector in FY2014. 

Sage has reimagined business and brings energy, experience and technology to inspire our customers to fulfil their dreams. Sage is a FTSE 100 company with 14,000 employees in 24 countries. 

Keywords: [“Sage”,”community”,”organization”]
Source: http://www.sage.com/company/news-and-events/2015/06/02/sage-launches-sage-foundation-to-lead-social-philanthropy

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. 

Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers. 

Keywords: [“work”,”Church”,”made”]
Source: https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

How Individuals and Corporations Participate 02/15 by Karen Rands

Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. 

From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives. 

Keywords: [“company”,”invest”,”Compassionate”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands/2018/02/15/compassionate-capitalism–how-individuals-and-corporations-participate

I am a “compassionate capitalist.”

The business teaches poor/middle class how to file taxes. It’s meant as a check against corporations and rich folks getting all the breaks. It’s to level the playing field to the common person. Other capitalists who’ve seen this business model are entering the market. It works! 

In year two, we get enough customers to keep the business afloat. We level the playing field against corporations! Success! Now, any labor simply must come from overseas, paying as close to nothing as I can manage. The tax code change is good sort of! 

I don’t need new customers; the new tax code means they all have to come back for re-education! So, it works! People buy just enough to pay lobbyists, pay new accountants, keep website running, expand. I’ve made the world a better place, no doubt! The playing field between common folk & corporations is more leveled than before, surely! 

Until the next year. My business is gone, so money I paid to lobbyists to keep tax code frozen has dried up. Similar services offering tax education also dry up. Corporations pay a vastly smaller percentage of taxes than common folk. 

Keywords: [“business”,”pay”,”tax”]
Source: https://medium.com/@RickPaulas/i-am-a-compassionate-capitalist-6b80e1d643c4

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-08-2018

The Good, the Bad and the Exaggerated in Michael Moore’s New Film, ‘Capitalism: A Love Story’

Michael Moore’s new movie, Capitalism: A Love Story, doesn’t pull any punches in its depiction of capitalism as the monster that is destroying America. Moore’s villains range from Wall Street bankers to Wal-Mart to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, while capitalism’s victims include those who are losing their jobs, their houses and, in some cases, their faith in a system that is supposed to reward hard work and playing by the rules. So Michael Moore scores some points there, although he was very selective in the way he did it. I don’t believe in the level of redistribution that Michael Moore would believe in – unconditional, not based on effort. At the same time, Michael Moore’s conclusion isn’t that we need to have more regulatory reform, especially to protect consumers, which is something I think we are in great need of – or that we simply need some more redistribution, which I also agree with if done smartly. 

Michael Moore was right that the mortgage area needs serious regulatory reform in order to make mortgages very transparent. A lot of people wanted something more than they could afford. So we have a lot lower prices than we had. It’s a lot cheaper to fly and there is a lot more competition. The problem is we have a lot of people who really enjoy flying. 

We all value art, but [because] a lot of people want to be artists, they don’t get paid [much]. No occupation pays well when a lot of people enjoy doing it – unless we simply tell some people that they can’t do what they love. In the mortgage field, a lot of people weren’t making well-informed decisions. 

Keywords: [“Moore”,”people”,”lot”]
Source: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/the-good-the-bad-and-the…

Jeri Hogarth: Jessica Jones & Female Capitalist Success

I’ve loved Jessica Jones’ ruthless lawyer, Jeri Hogarth, since she debuted in the first season. I thought it was a brilliant switch to make the comics’ male Jeryn Hogarth into Jeri Hogarth, but still imbue her with all the callousness, drive, and selfish confidence that we associate with high-powered corporate lawyers. That’s because Jeri’s queerness is never the source of her evil; wealth is. Jeri is a powerful, driven career woman, but the things that make her so powerful-buying into the corporate game, shameless self-interest, and a confidence that being smart and rich gives you the right to control other people-are also the things that so often make her evil. As the second season opens, we find Jeri doing much of the same. 

Jeri is rude to the sex workers she hires; she ogles her yoga instructor. Jeri is, as she’s always been, a woman who likes a little indebtedness in her romantic partners, her associates, and her friends. Her growth here was getting back to being Jeri even in the face of something she couldn’t control-something that, in its power over her and in the way it leads to her humiliation, could have made her not feel like Jeri anymore. In all her many facets, Jeri captures my incredibly complicated feelings about women like this. With Jeri Hogarth, Netflix is exploring those contradictions of female corporate power. 

We see Jeri’s admirable tenacity, intelligence, and confidence in a world that tells her to shrink herself. Jeri is a powerful, successful queer woman in a world that makes it really, really hard to be such a thing and still be decent. 

Keywords: [“Jeri”,”power”,”she's”]
Source: https://www.themarysue.com/jeri-hogarth-jessica-jones-season-2

Why Intellectuals Hate Capitalism

Mackey, 62, continues to set the pace for what’s expected in organic and sustainably harvested food. Because of Whole Foods’ educated customer base and because Mackey is himself a vegan and a champion of collaboration between management and workers, it’s easy to mistake him for a progressive left-winger. A high-profile critic of the minimum wage, Obamacare, and the regulatory state, Mackey believes that free markets are the best way not only to raise living standards but to create meaning for individuals, communities, and society. Conscious Capitalism, the 2013 book he co-authored with Rajendra Sisodia, lays out a detailed vision for a post-industrial capitalism that addresses spiritual desire as much as physical need. Reason: You believe capitalism is not only the greatest wealth creator but helps poor people get rich. 

John Mackey: Intellectuals have always disdained commerce. You might say that capitalism was the first time that businesspeople caught a break. Mackey: It’s sort of where people stand in the social hierarchy. Mackey: I don’t know if it’s a psychological switch so much as that they weren’t necessarily grounded in the philosophy of capitalism. They’re attempting to not fall, so they try to rig the game, and we have crony capitalism. 

Mackey: The impetus behind so many of these types of regulations in the workplace is, in a sense, to shackle business again-to get it back under the control of the intellectuals. It’ll stifle the dynamic creative destruction of capitalism. 

Keywords: [“Mackey”,”capitalism”,”business”]
Source: https://reason.com/archives/2015/10/27/why-intellectuals-hate-capital

Antonio Gramsci

Brecht’s key debate was class equality, where the influence of Karl Marx, Louis Althusser and Antonio Gramsci’s theories were and still are evident in Brecht’s plays. The Threepenny Opera: The Ballad Opera and the Socio-political Criticism and Change Bertolt Brecht’s aggressive political idealism and determination in using art to pose challenging questions about the conflicts between society and morality generated intense controversy throughout his lifetime. Brecht offers alternatives in life rather than Gay’s mocking characters that just make the viewer laugh 19 PDF created with pdfFactory Pro trial version www. The problems stem from the fact that when Brecht wrote the play he was only beginning to explore Marxism and he did not yet identify with the class struggle. Brecht’s final goal is that he wants the audience to leave his play with a logical desire to change society. 

Brecht is trying to make people think about the play rather than feel emotions. Brecht’s use of songs does not represent any attempt aiming at intensifying or heightening the conflict of the play. The songs in Brecht’s plays deserve some discussion because they are as famous as the play itself. Brecht exposes his understanding of death penalty in the play. The story of the play is dramatized by Brecht from an old Chinese parable. 

Brecht’s attitude towards war is derived from Marxism. Brecht should have something rather than cause and effect to connect the separate parts of his play. 

Keywords: [“Brecht”,”play”,”war”]
Source: https://www.scribd.com/doc/82102711/Bertolt-Brecht

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-01-2018


Compassionate Capitalist – When Angel Investors are “Takers”

Qlipoth: Easier to imagine the end of the world…

Cyberpunk is not really apocalyptic, and I think the better coordinate is Ballard, the Ballard of the multiple ‘end-of-the-worlds’, minus the Byronic melancholy and the rich orchestral pessimism and Weltschmerz. For it is the end of the world that is in question here; and that could be exhilarating if apocalypse were the only way of imagining that world’s disappearance. ‘ Someone once said that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than to imagine the end of capitalism. We can now revise that and witness the attempt to imagine capitalism by way of imagining the end of the world. Ballard’s imagined world is reduced to the dimensions of that island created by intertwined expressways on which individuals in their cellular commodities hurtle to their destruction or that apartment complex in which the wealthy and professional classes degenerate into anarchic tribal warfare among themselves. The transformation of H. 

Bruce Franklin’s Marxist analysis of the ideology of Ballard and his genre into Jameson’s vague quip in Hegelese regarding the disposition of some amorphous and unspecified Geist of the Zeit perfectly exemplifies the relentless, Orwellian cultural strategy which characterized the Reagan era’s political reaction in culture. Even after the ‘end of history’ there has seemed to persist some historical curiosity of a generally systemic – rather than merely anecdotal – kind: not merely to know what will happen next, but as a more general anxiety about the larger fate or destiny of our system or mode of production. It seems easier for us today to imagine the thoroughgoing deterioration of the earth and of nature than the breakdown of late capitalism; and perhaps that is due to some weakness in our imaginations. This is the sense of the revival of that ‘end of history’ Alexandre Kojève thought he could find in Hegel and Marx, and which he took to mean some ultimate achievement of democratic equality in both American capitalism and Soviet communism, only later identifying a significant variant of it in what he called Japanese ‘snobisme’, but that we can today identify as postmodernity itself. In another sense, of course, this is simply the old ‘end of ideology’ with a vengeance, and cynically plays on the waning of collective hope in a particularly conservative market climate. 

The end of history is also the final form of the temporal paradoxes we have tried to dramatize here; namely that a rhetoric of absolute change is, for the postmodern, no more satisfactory than the language of absolute identity and unchanging standardization cooked up by the great corporations, whose concept of innovation is best illustrated by the neologism and the logo and their equivalents in the real of built space, ‘lifestyle’ corporate culture and psychic programming. As Fredric Jameson perspicaciously remarked, nobody seriously considers possible alternatives to capitalism any longer, whereas popular imagination is persecuted by the visions of the forthcoming ‘breakdown of nature’, of the stoppage of all life on earth – it seems easier to imagine the ‘end of the world’ than a far more modest change in the mode of production, as if liberal capitalism is the ‘real’ that will somehow survive even under conditions of a global ecological catastrophe. 

Keywords: [“end”,”Ballard”,”world”]
Source: http://qlipoth.blogspot.com/2009/11/easier-to-imagine-end-of-world.html

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Success

SIX KEY DIMENSIONS OF CSR. In Western Europe, Japan, and North America, an increasing number of companies are finding that it makes good business sense to fully integrate the interests and needs of customers, employees, suppliers, communities, and our planet – as well as to those of shareholders – into corporate strategies. Whereas five years ago a survey by McKinsey & Company of the reasons for success in the machinery industry showed that factors such as cross-functional teams, single sourcing, and group work differentiated the best performing companies from the weaker ones, a more recent survey concluded that what differentiates the leaders from the laggards is their relationships with their customers and their suppliers. A number of companies participated in a workshop organized by Business for Social Responsibility recently in Hong Kong on this subject of monitoring child labor practices in Asian suppliers. Another organization helping companies improve their environmental performance is the International Network for Environmental Management, a world federation of non-profit business organizations for environmental management and sustainable development. 

Social investment: At another level, companies support initiatives in the areas of education and social problems such as unemployment, exclusion, and homelessness, often in partnership with government authorities and non-governmental organizations. Corporate involvement in the Brussels-based European Business Network for Social Cohesion and in projects to alleviate social exclusion is exemplary, as is the support of hundreds of the largest companies in the United Kingdom for the notable achievements of such associations as Business in the Community, the Prince of Wales Business Leaders Forum, and Common Purpose Partnerships: At a third level, corporations contribute to communities through direct support to activities which enhance their commercial success, including cause-related marketing. Of course, one of the questions frequently raised about activities and strategies in social responsibility is whether they detract from a company’s financial performance. The most comprehensive service of research and analysis of company environmental and social responsibility is offered by The Council on Economic Priorities. MANAGING FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Many companies are making significant improvements in their environmental and social management practices. 

The company must recognize and respect the personal worth of employees and allow them to share in the success of the company. During the past ten years, a number of business networks and companies have engaged in environmental and social accounting. The notion of ‘political companies’, on the other hand, concerns the business enterprise with its surrounding eco-system, the external stakeholders: shareholders, customers, the community, interest groups, standard-setting organisations, society at large. 

Keywords: [“Company”,”Business”,”social”]
Source: http://bahai-library.com/palazzi_starcher_social_responsibility

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-28-2018

The greatest MLK speeches you never heard

King may be a national hero whose birthday the country commemorates on Monday, but to many he remains a one-dimensional hero – the vast body of his work unknown. That’s the question CNN put to some members of King’s inner circle as well as top King scholars. We asked them to pick their favorite overlooked gems from King, any extraordinary spoken or written words people don’t typically hear during King commemorations. King put principle over personal popularity and continued to oppose the war. Why it’s important: It is one of King’s most electrifying speeches. 

Sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta on July 4, 1965.Why it’s important: We’ve heard about King’s dream. With the rise of the Black Power movement, King seemed dull and obsolete to many youths in the late 1960s who preferred the fire of Malcolm X and the Black Panthers. King is holding a meeting of top staffers in 1963 just before they initiate a campaign in Birmingham. Written on July 18, 1952, to his future wife, Coretta Scott, in which King revealed some surprising thoughts on capitalism and communism. Why it’s important: There’s a theory that King adopted more radical economic theories in the last three years of his life. 

King’s 1952 letter reveals he was radical far earlier than most people realize. King’s fifth book was published in 1967.Why it’s important: This is King’s last – and most radical – book. 

Keywords: [“King”,”white”,”rights”]
Source: https://www.cnn.com/2014/01/19/us/king-speeches-never-heard

Compassion and Capitalism – The Best You Magazine

David Meltzer was born in Akron, Ohio In 1968 and was described as a bright and able student at school. Upon graduating, he entered the world of business, where he was soon part of the upper echelon of the business community. Everywhere he worked in the world of business, Meltzer appeared to have the Midas touch. In his 30s, already a multi-millionaire, Meltzer’s career went off the rails. Meltzer decided he needed to stop and look at how he’d previously created success. 

Meltzer explored spirituality, bringing a broader more balanced approach to his business life. Through this process, he worked out four principles that would become his guiding light in all his future business interactions. Meltzer soon rose to great business and personal success. It is this willingness to trust in what the universe is doing that defines Meltzer’s approach to life. It fit perfectly with the notion of gratitude, one of his own core beliefs in the philosophy of business. 

Whether it’s the elementary school, high school, college or law school he attended, he says Meltzer enjoys sharing the lessons he’s learned to empower young people who may be in a similar situation. His second book, Compassionate Capitalism: AJourney to the Soul of Business, was published In 2016 and is co-authored with Blaine Bartlett. 

Keywords: [“Meltzer”,”business”,”works”]
Source: http://thebestyoumagazine.co/compassion-and-capitalism

Christian Research Institute

In response to the critics of capitalism, many conservative Christians turn to philosopher Ayn Rand for ammunition. Finally, Smith argued that capitalism channels greed, which is a good thing. Others, including many Christians, want to defend capitalism, but end up drawing on the work of philosopher and playwright Ayn Rand, who called greed a virtue. THE BEEHIVE. Rand wasn’t the first one to identify capitalism with greed. 

THEN COMES RAND. Perhaps more than anyone else, Ayn Rand not only identified capitalism with greed, but defended it in those terms. We don’t need Rand’s philosophy to defend capitalism. FALLING INTO CAPITALISM. So, contrary to Rand, capitalism doesn’t need greed. 18 Capitalism is just greed elevated to economics, or so they think. 

To be sure, Rand and other champions of capitalism appeal to greed, even glory in it. That’s why greed can explain why capitalism works no better than it can explain the universal thirst for, say, well-synchronized traffic lights: greed is universal. Once we comprehend the nature of entrepreneurial capitalism, we see that it has fit within the Christian worldview all along. Jay W. Richards is the author of Money, Greed, and God: Why Capitalism Is the Solution and Not the Problem. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”greed”,”Rand”]
Source: http://www.equip.org/article/was-ayn-rand-right

Capitalism VS Human Compassion

Capitalism can survive as long as there is no greed. Almost daily we read about some bank, investment broker or some con-artist scamming people out of millions of dollars. We expect banks to raise fees, we expect to lose money in our 401k, we expect to pay high interest rates on credit cards,,,,. The companies were more interested in protecting their money, then the health and safety of the employees. Look at all of the people that were conned into signing flexible mortgage rates. 

Get the people to sign the flexible mortgage, then hike the rates up so high the family can not pay, the bank gets the home, rinse, repeat,,,,. I think capitalism can work, but not while unbridled greed is involved. The US government established free trade with China, now we get to reap higher taxes to pay for more people on welfare. I feel there is a line in the sand that capitalism should not cross. Just because someone has the right to make money, does not give them the right to exploit others. 

Company ABC makes widgets; highest paid employee makes $30 million a year, the lowest paid sub-contractor of a sub-contractor should make $1 million a year, give or take a few bucks. Post your comments in this forum thread about Human Compassion VS Capitalism. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”people”,”company”]
Source: http://www.survivalboards.com/2012-03-10/capitalism-vs-human-compassion

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-16-2018


Compassionate Capitalist – When should an entrepreneur get a patent

What is Compassionate Capitalism and Why We Need it in These Times of Planetary Crisis ?

In recent years, there has been much talk about Capitalism evolving into a model of economy wherein corporations ensure that communitarian and people oriented business models are embraced so that profit is not the only criterion or reason why they are in business. This form of capitalism which is sometimes called Compassionate Capitalism or Capitalism with a human face is finding many takers both in the developed Western world and in the developing and emerging world in Asia and Latin America. Compassionate Capitalism means that corporations have to account for the costs that they impose on the environment, the communities that lie in the vicinity of their factories and plants as well as offices, their employees whom they have to treat with more kindness, and the consumers and other stakeholders to whom they must be accountable. In other words, corporations must practice a variety of capitalism that is more humane, compassionate, and just and fair. Thus, Compassionate Capitalism not only needs a complete rethink of the existing paradigm of profit before people but also needs a retooling of the principles underpinning it to place people before profit. 

While this might seem idealistic and Utopian, it needs to be mentioned that in these times of planetary crisis where the Climate Change is threatening the very existence of civilization, where gross income inequalities and the obscene wealth gap is leading to social unrest, and where the ever accelerating technological change threatens the social contract on which our relations with the world are based, Compassionate Capitalism is no longer an abstract and remote concept, but something that we need on an urgent basis. Having said that, there are those and who are in the majority at the moment, who dismiss all this talk of Compassionate Capitalism as Hot Air or Bombastic and Ideological nonsense that does not take into account the ground realities of how capitalism and business work. Thus, in one stroke, the debate is dead in the water as the dominant view is that markets take care of all the problems that arise from capitalistic tendencies, and the self-correcting nature of markets is such that sooner or later, business finds a way out of the crisis. When one compares and contrasts the arguments for and against Compassionate Capitalism, we find that there is much Hubris among those who oppose this form of capitalism, and much Naivet, among those who support it. The point to be noted is that we are now at a stage where a New Narrative has to emerge that can hopefully reconcile the differences between the dominant model and the minority view that espouses Compassionate Capitalism. 

This means that we need the case for Compassionate Capitalism to arise from within the ranks of those who practice capitalism and not from those who are well meaning but not in a position to change the Status Quo. Already, this is happening to a certain extent in the West and East as well with prominent Technology Sector business leaders such as Bill Gates, N R Narayana Murthy, Elon Musk, and Mark Zuckerberg, espousing some or more of the strands of Compassionate Capitalism ideology and coming in support of Basic Income for All, Protecting the Environment, Reducing Inequality, and batting for more Gender Inclusivity. 

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”business”,”Compassionate”]
Source: https://www.managementstudyguide.com/compassionate-capitalism.htm

The Compassionate Way to Combat Creationism

In a world where blank-slatism, anti-vaccine rhetoric, myths about the effects of parenting, and climate change denial persist and even thrive, it should come as no surprise that a contingent of creationist Christians continues to believe in a 6,000-year-old Earth in modern American society. In 2015, the Pew Research Center released the latest national data from another study which, since it was launched in 2007, has provided remarkable insight into the shifting demographics of American Christian culture. This change in attitude, which now represents a remarkable majority of American Christians, has occurred by differing but consistently positive degrees across the broad spectrum of Christian faith, including those most historically opposed to homosexuality. Evangelical Protestants, who constitute a sizeable chunk of white southern fundamentalists, have increased in acceptance of homosexuality from 26 percent in 2007 to 34 percent in 2015. Some have argued that it is even more difficult to maintain an internally consistent set of beliefs as a Christian who accepts homosexuality than as a Christian who accepts evolutionary science. 

Let us contrast this attitude to the perspective taken by Daniel Karslake’s 2007 documentary For the Bible Tells Me So, which aims to provide a rich and emotional exploration of attitudes towards homosexuality in contemporary Christian American society. In short, the cultural campaign against the traditionalist Christian views on homosexuality has largely been one of compassion, empathy, and reason. 2 The effect of contact on attitudes towards homosexuality has been found in college settings, has been found to be a better predictor than any demographic variable, and has been found to correlate positively with the total number of homosexuals contacted. Creationist Christians largely occupy demographics that have little positive contact with scientists and evolution educators, many of whom react to deeply religious people with, if not outright condescension, intentional segregation and wilful ignorance. Rather than demean, mock, and ignore what creationist Christians believe, we intended to tackle some of the specific lines of creationist reasoning in an extraordinary amount of depth-such as their arguments against radiometric dating and the evolution of birds from dinosaurs-and to do so from a place of compassion and respect, and from an understanding of human nature. Our five authors represent two Christians, a deist, and two atheists, but together we share a powerful history: we were all raised in creationist households, and each of us later rejected this ideology in favor of a scientific worldview. 

My hope is that this understanding of human nature-perhaps together with a dash of compassion and sensitivity-can be valuable to both the Christians and the non-theists among us. 

Keywords: [“Christian”,”homosexuality”,”religious”]
Source: http://quillette.com/2017/10/28/combating-creationism/#comment-10664

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-14-2018

Why It’s Good Business For Levi’s To Care About What You Do With Your Jeans at Home

Your next pair of Levi’s might come with a clothesline or shoebox-sized dryer. After a recent lifecycle assessment, Levi’s realized that 60% of the climate impact of a pair of jeans comes after the jeans are made and sold; nearly 80% of this is from drying the jeans in a dryer. Instead, it launched Care to Air, an awareness campaign and contest to shift consumer behavior in favor of the environment. In partnershihp with Myoo Create, Levi’s will award $10,000 for the world’s most innovative, covetable, and sustainable air-drying solution for clothing. You don’t have to buy jeans, or even own Levi’s products, for the campaign to be a success. Since Levi’s has chosen the environment-at-large as a beneficiary, it doesn’t get to leverage the credibility or press that a nonprofit partner would bring to bear. Part of a company’s responsibility is to educate and involve its consumers in making more responsible choices and to pressure their competitors to raise their responsibility game. This is exactly what Levi’s is doing with Care to Air, and it’s brilliant because as much as you register the brand behind this campaign, it isn’t about the brand at all. It’s about what I do with my clothes at home and how I understand this to affect the environment.

Keywords: [“Levi's”,”jeans”,”consumer”]
Source: http://causecapitalism.com/why-its-good-business-for-levis-to-care-about…

Pay attention, Progressives: Conservative Millennial Allie Stuckey SCHOOLS Americans on why Capitalism is superior to Socialism – twitchy.com

Allie Stuckey, better known as the Conservative Millennial, explained why Capitalism and the free market are far superior to Socialism. It’s the very reason why people want to make a life here. 1 reason full-on socialism fails is because it negates humans’ inherent desire for ownership. Shared means of production=no private property= no ownership. Socialists ignore that people possess an inherent drive for their own piece of the pie- to have something that’s truly theirs & to do something that actually matters, contributes & provides. Capitalism, though imperfect, is the only economic system that recognizes & rewards this. Free enterprise has lifted more people out of poverty, mediocrity & misery than socialism ever has or will- because, unlike socialism, it taps into the tenacity of the human spirit rather than subdues it. We enjoy the best technology, entertainment and quality of life in the world because of capitalism. People do not become kinder when they’re forced to share. While capitalism isn’t perfect, it is the only system that encourages freedom, innovation & generosity. Socialism seeks to render those things useless through absolute government control. I can’t believe that in 2018 people still have to explain why socialism doesn’t work.

Keywords: [“Socialism”,”people”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://twitchy.com/bethb-313034/2018/03/11/pay-attention…

Compassionate Capitalism

I live amongst a population that is educated, involved and hard-working and as we get older and earn more, the trend is to buy a bigger house, a nicer car, and more luxury brand clothing. I don’t have time or money left to have compassion on others because I’ve spent so much of it on myself and my family. I’m talking about compassion that compels action and affects change. Compassion that compels us to downgrade so someone else can upgrade above the poverty line. Compassion needs the resources that our capitalist society produces. When I do buy, I buy from companies that value the dignity of the people working for them. I’m just making sure compassion guides my contribution to it. I mean, I just got done saying we should have less and spend less and you probably received a marketing email from us this week asking you to buy our not-so-cheap clothes. I’m more interested in you becoming a conscious consumer than a repeat consumer. Third, for us at Vickery Trading Co., capitalism is our compassion. We use something that people are already buying and turn it into opportunity for the marginalized. Our Associates earn fair wages for their hard work while learning job and life skills so they can go pursue the American Dream.

Keywords: [“compassion”,”buy”,”more”]
Source: https://vickerytrading.org/compassionate-capitalism

No hope without compassion: the importance of compassion in recovery-focused mental health services: Journal of Mental Health: Vol 20, No 6

Whilst current policy is replete with recovery language and references to the need for services to create a sense of hope and optimism, there is less understanding about how such hope may be engendered within services. We propose that an understanding of compassion is necessary to appreciate what actually stimulates hope-inspiring practices. An examination of the continuing relevance of compassion to mental health care and an exploration of its place within modern mental health policy and practice. A review of the compassion deficit in mental health care and a critical examination of whether the direction of current mental health policy in the UK is likely to facilitate compassionate care. Compassion needs to be viewed not merely as an individual expression or property but something which must be nurtured in context, through relationships, cultures and healing environments. Current mental health policy and practice does not appear to prioritise the development of such contexts. The development of compassionate contexts should have a stronger place in modern mental health practice and policy.

Keywords: [“mental”,”health”,”compassion”]
Source: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638237.2011.583949

Bookstore – Conscious Capitalism

The flood of information, unprecedented transparency, increasing interconnectedness and our global interdependence – are dramatically reshaping today’s world, the world of business, and our lives. We are in the Era of Behavior and the rules of the game have fundamentally changed. It is no longer what you do that matters most and sets you apart from others, but how you do what you do. Whats are commodities, easily duplicated or reverse-engineered. Sustainable advantage and enduring success for organizations and the people who work for them now lie in the realm of how, the new frontier of conduct. Seidman’s distinct vision of the world, business, and human endeavor has helped enable more than 15 million people doing business in more than 120 countries to outbehave the competition. Now updated and expanded, HOW includes a new Fore¬word from President Bill Clinton and a new Preface from Dov Seidman on why how we behave, lead, govern, operate, consume, engender trust in our relationships, and relate to others matters more than ever and in ways it never has before.

Keywords: [“how”,”business”,”world”]
Source: https://www.consciouscapitalism.org/bookstore

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-13-2018

On Weinstein: We’re All Accountable for Our Cultural Issues

Then many more stories emerged about the abuse of women, mainly by powerful men. After a while of digesting all this, I realized that women are stronger than men. Today, the world continues to favour men, because they’re men. The problem is not only that some power-hungry, egoistic men are sick. Rather, the problem is that when such men are sick, it has severe consequences for all of us, because men still, to a large extent, rule the world. I remember Rebecca Solnit saying something about men being the problem-not all men, but men. Because men, as philosopher Simone de Beauvoir said about women, aren’t born men; they become men. Gender can too easily turn into a lucrative identity of being this or that. It’s naïve and wrong to reduce men to being intrinsically morally bad. What Weinstein and his ilk have done is a violation of many women, but not only women. Due to capitalism, we’re told that freedom is related to property rights, as if anyone could own another human being. Narcissism, egoism, nationalism they’re all related to capitalism and the right to own a territory, the illusion of being in control and the belief that some people can treat others as they see fit, because of ownership, money and such. It shows people who feel superior because of money, gender, race or religion that the most powerful human being is a person who cares for what brings life.

Keywords: [“men”,”being”,”gender”]
Source: https://www.themindfulword.org/2018/survival-compassionate…

Socialism Is Not the Answer

Pope Francis is right to call attention to poverty, but socialism is not the solution. The pope’s emphasis on the needs of the poor is important, especially in today’s politics, where poverty is often a public-policy sideline. In calling attention to the problem, he fails to understand that free-market capitalism is not a cause of poverty, but a solution. In 1980, less than 1 percent of Argentinians lived in extreme poverty, while in neighboring Chile, the extreme-poverty rate exceeded 15 percent. Today, while the proportion of Argentinians living in extreme poverty has risen slightly, to nearly 3 percent, Chile has seen the most dramatic reduction in poverty in Latin America. Fewer than 2 percent of Chileans now live in extreme poverty. Poverty, which briefly declined at the beginning of Chávez’s reign, has begun rising rapidly. Although accurate figures are hard to come by, it is estimated that between one-third and one-half of the population now lives in poverty. In China alone, even the partial adoption of a market-oriented economy has saved more than 650 million people from poverty. Almost 84 percent of Chinese lived in extreme poverty in 1987. As Bono, hardly a right-wing icon, explains, ‘Capitalism takes more people out of poverty than aid. Throughout most of human history, most of mankind lived in truly abject poverty.

Keywords: [“poverty”,”more”,”capitalism”]
Source: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/424464/pope-and-poverty

Christian Heritage

These give us license to dismiss some ideas quickly, or to answer objections swiftly so that we might be free to mull over other ideas. A free market, we should remember, is not fueled by greed, but by service. First, taxing one group of people to give the money to another group of people is bad for the people who receive the money. When we tax one group to give the money to another we create disincentive for everyone to work, which leads to greater poverty for everyone. Second, taking from one group to give to another fails the compassion test because it is not compassionate to those who are having their wealth taken. We surely aren’t showing grace when we come to take what we will later give. If having more than someone else is a sure sign of greed, we are all guilty, including even those to whom we give money. Finally, and most importantly, asking the state to take from one group to give to others isn’t compassionate because we are not the ones making the sacrifice. I am not demonstrating a giving heart if I steal my neighbor’s car, and give it to a struggling single parent. Christians are called to be compassionate, which means we give what is ours, not what is our neighbors’. We give in the name of Jesus, not in the name of Uncle Sam. It says we are called to give of our own wealth, not the wealth of others.

Keywords: [“give”,”greed”,”more”]
Source: https://www.christianheritageonline.org/compassion-on-the-cheap

Compassion and Capitalism – The Best You Magazine

David Meltzer was born in Akron, Ohio In 1968 and was described as a bright and able student at school. Upon graduating, he entered the world of business, where he was soon part of the upper echelon of the business community. Everywhere he worked in the world of business, Meltzer appeared to have the Midas touch. In his 30s, already a multi-millionaire, Meltzer’s career went off the rails. Meltzer decided he needed to stop and look at how he’d previously created success. Meltzer explored spirituality, bringing a broader more balanced approach to his business life. Through this process, he worked out four principles that would become his guiding light in all his future business interactions. Meltzer soon rose to great business and personal success. It is this willingness to trust in what the universe is doing that defines Meltzer’s approach to life. It fit perfectly with the notion of gratitude, one of his own core beliefs in the philosophy of business. Whether it’s the elementary school, high school, college or law school he attended, he says Meltzer enjoys sharing the lessons he’s learned to empower young people who may be in a similar situation. His second book, Compassionate Capitalism: AJourney to the Soul of Business, was published In 2016 and is co-authored with Blaine Bartlett.

Keywords: [“Meltzer”,”business”,”works”]
Source: https://thebestyoumagazine.co/compassion-and-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-12-2018

What is Communism?

Communism works the day people dare to open their minds, hearts and everything there is to open, and lay down all kinds of judgment. As the world is now, communism will never work, and the beginning of world wide communism would have to be fitted to every area, but in time they all would work for a common goal and the science will move a lot faster than it does today. Communism offers rich leaders and all poor people; it is a failed ideology. In Communism, people would work because they would know the necessity of their and work, if they refused to work they would not benefit from the labor of others. The closest thing a Communism would have to a government would be councils elected by the people, councils which would be kept under control by the people; they would have no real power or authority. Some people hate the rich and some cops hate rich people and they want communism. Communism would work in its purest form if people were mere machines. Communism can’t work because people have different talents and skills, thus people can’t all be equal, or classless. Communism strips the power of the people; there is no freedom as all the media is censored, which in turn limits freedom of expression. What people need to understand is that there is idealistic communism, and then there is the reality: corrupt dictatorships posing as communism, which is in fact the opposite of the idealistic people’s rule. According the definition of communism by the man who coined the phrase, communism *is* stateless and classless. Most of people outside really scared of communism will go into the people mind and try to get rid of it.

Keywords: [“communism”,”people”,”work”]
Source: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-communism

CAPITALISM AND COMPASSION: a test of Milbrath

Summary – From his observations of environmentalists Milbrath extracts the generalization that there is something inimical between capitalism and compassion. Clearly, Milbrath believes that capitalism and altruistic compassion are fundamentally at odds with one-another. If capitalism and altruistic compassion are opposed, then it should follow that those who feel at home with capitalism and support it will be less altruistic and compassionate. In the subsequent 1983 State election voters had a 3-way choice — between a Leftist party and two conservative parties. There could be no doubt that a vote for the National party was a vote for capitalism. Conservatives who were less confident in the virtue of capitalism could vote for the Liberal party. The differential degree of altruism shown by the supporters of the three main parties in this election should therefore provide a fairly finely-tuned test of Milbrath’s hypothesis. If Milbrath is right, the National party voters should show especially low scores on the compassionate altruism scale and especially high scores on the `AO’ scale. RESULTS. The contrast of chief interest was thought to lie between the National party voters and the Labor party voters. National voters were significantly more ambitious and Labor voters were significantly more compassionate. Voters for the other conservative party showed mean scores on altruism almost identical to those of Labor voters and mean scores on achievement orientation almost identical to National voters. Many quite compassionate people vote in Queensland for a fanatical champion of capitalism.

Keywords: [“vote”,”party”,”CAPITALISM”]
Source: http://jonjayray.com/milbrath.html

compassionate capitalism Archives

That’s a small number, nearly insignificant, but if every company dedicated just 1% of its revenues and time to the community around it, the difference would be monumental. A business is not an island; it’s the product of the community it was formed in, and its enduring success is dependent on that same community. This idea is at odds with the way many companies do business. It’s accepted that many corporations are more concerned with profits than with the community or environment surrounding it. That’s enough to fix up a local park, keep a food pantry stocked for months, or divide between a few local charities. This practice doesn’t just take the cooperation of a few huge corporations; it takes small businesses, too. If enough small businesses joined together, donating a fraction of their revenue and some of their time, they could help prevent children from going hungry by sponsoring community gardens. They could clean up their neighborhoods and make their towns and cities a cleaner, safer place to live, or support a local animal shelter, or host workshops to teach career skills to local students or unemployed community members. They sound like such small things, but when all of these small things add up, they become an unstoppable movement of compassion and gratitude. There are also tangible benefits for businesses, such as an improved business profile as members of the community associate the business with its involvement. You may be just one person, or the leader of a small business. Even a small percentage can have a lasting positive effect on your surrounding area.

Keywords: [“community”,”small”,”business”]
Source: http://www.legendsleadershipconcepts.com/tag/compassionate-capitalism

Capitalism and compassion: Can they coexist? – SD Monitor News

In a free market, the bottom line is simply, the bottom line. Capitalism has become largely about self-interest, consumerism, sleight of hand and the bottom line. A person may be able to provide financially, but not emotionally – because the two systems are often disjointed. In a system that is profit driven, the raw material for intimacy and connection is rarely cultivated or valued. Fact is, business is personal, and sterilizing the brutal impacts of self-interested economics through such phraseology does not shelter us. Poverty has an impact on both physical and mental health. As the middle class founders and people blame themselves for their fiscal woes, which in turn may be associated with higher levels of stress, as well as depression, anxiety and maladaptive coping, the impacts of a system based solely on a bottom line which benefits a few appear to be bad for the mental health of many. Our economic and incentivization systems are a set-up for failure and disappointment for those who are the most vulnerable to experience the worst outcomes. The free market system has become the bellwether of myriad systems in our culture – educational, commercial, media, medical and spiritual. It becomes difficult to teach children empathy and emotional regulation when the system into which they are being acculturated does not value these qualities. Because the system does not equitably provide opportunity across all socioeconomic strata. As the cultural, economic and political needles move, so too does mental health.

Keywords: [“system”,”economic”,”impact”]
Source: https://sdmonitornews.com/2018/02/27/capitalism-and-compassion-can…