J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-10-2018

Socialism, Once in Power, Outlaws It

Socialism on the other hand has no checks and balances against greed. Socialism therefore cannot produce a people who are free to be compassionate. Although socialism is viewed as compassion, it doesn’t allow room for compassionate giving because by definition, under a socialist system, there shouldn’t be any need for anyone to have to give compassionately. Socialism has to keep people poor in order to justify its own existence. Socialism strips the individual of their right to own private property. 

To give freely is treasonous because, in theory, under socialism there is no need for people to be compassionate. Unlike compassionate capitalism, compassionate socialism cannot exist. It’s an oxymoron because socialism as absolute economic law only has what it’s taken from the people; it has no capital outside what socialism has taken without compassion; creating no real margin of abundance for individuals to give compassionately from. The Bible does not preach or foster socialism as an absolute economic law or morality. Socialism has no room and sees no need for compassion once it holds power. 

The socialist only sees the capitalist as his or her enemy, upholding socialism religiously, without opposition. Socialism is seen as true compassion and therefore the only compassion anyone truly needs. 

Keywords: [“Socialism”,”give”,”compassionate”]
Source: https://www.xyz.net.au/capitalism-needs-compassion-socialism-power…

Blue Print for How to Build A Culture of Empathy?

We’d like to come up with a blueprint for building a culture of empathy and compassion. The more empathy you receive, the more space you have to give it. Develop training that deepens the individual components of empathy. Change all social institutions to actively support empathy. Go to the pain, suffering, fear, alienation with awareness, presence and empathy. 

Have TV moderators using empathy to bring people together. I take heart that there are many people bringing forward empathy. Local level with skilled moderators, who want to get people heard. Want to talk with peoples who’s letters confused me. I don’t understand this lack of empathy around the world. 

This group used reflective listening to deepen empathy for each person. Edwin told story of visiting Tea Party and Republican State convention to talk with participants about the role of empathy in their lives. 

Keywords: [“Empathy”,”people”,”Culture”]
Source: http://cultureofempathy.com/Projects/How-To-Build-Empathy/index.htm

Halcyonic by HTML5 UP

This is Halcyonic, a free site template by AJ for HTML5 UP. It’s responsive, built on HTML5 + CSS3, and includes 5 unique page layouts. Yes! Halcyonic is built on the Skel framework, so it has full responsive support for desktop, tablet, and mobile device displays. Halcyonic is licensed under the CCA 3.0 license, so use it for personal or commercial use as much as you like. 

Duis neque nisi, dapibus sed mattis quis, rutrum accumsan sed. Suspendisse vitae magna eget odio amet mollis justo facilisis quis. Sed sagittis mauris amet tellus gravida lorem ipsum. What We Do A subheading about what we do Sed mattis quis rutrum accum. What People Are Saying And a final subheading about our clients. 

Keywords: [“sed”,”quis”,”Halcyonic”]
Source: http://www.copyblogwriter.com/compassionate_capitalism_how_corporations…

Culture of the New Capitalism

The distinguished sociologist Richard Sennett surveys major differences between earlier forms of industrial capitalism and the more global, more febrile, ever more mutable version of capitalism that is taking its place. Only a certain kind of human being can prosper in unstable, fragmentary institutions: the culture of the new capitalism demands an ideal self oriented to the short term, focused on potential ability rather than accomplishment, willing to discount or abandon past experience. Richard Sennett teaches sociology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the London School of Economics. His recent publications include The Corrosion of Character and Respect in a World of Inequality. 

Keywords: [“Sennett”,”more”,”how”]
Source: https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300119923/culture-new-capitalism

The Compassionate Librano

On the prowl sort of whereas an Alligator is any woman out there ready to devour or destroy the reputation, livelihood and well being of any male she has her sights on – without due course, due diligence, due evidence, or due process. We’re due they, the radical feminists, were due to say. No more holding the door open, paying for dinner, compliments, drinks or whatever. I would belch, fart, grunt, swear, and scratch my ass – wiggle me nuts – tell dirty jokes, well perhaps not, and – y’know all of those things that define a male – in front of you. I would think twice about working with a woman because you just never know. 

No defence, no evidence, just hearsay and buddy you are screwed. 

Keywords: [“due”,”well”,”woman”]
Source: http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2018/01/the-compassiona-2.html

UPC’s Seventh Annual Conscious Eating Conference: What are the Most Compassionate Choices?

You are cordially invited to attendUnited Poultry Concerns’ Seventh Annual Conference. Conference Synopsis: United Poultry Concerns’ 7th Annual Conscious Eating Conference brings expert speakers to Berkeley, California to share their ideas about the best food choices we can make for the planet, ourselves, and other animals. We will explore the ethics of eating and the effect of agriculture on animals and the planet, and why it matters. 20 pre-registration for all others, $30 at the door the day of the event. Food: Registration includes a continental breakfast of vegan pastries & fruit, delicious vegan lunch, and all-day coffee & tea. 

Keywords: [“Conference”,”vegan”,”animals”]
Source: http://upc-online.org/forums/2018

The C word

Bill Gates recently gave a speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos. The idea is this: the increase in standards of living brought by capitalism mainly benefit the rich, so companies should put more effort into developing products and services for the poor. Both these bargains are bound up with capitalism, which is centred not on the free market or the accumulation of wealth, but instead on the idea of false choice. Yes, you may buy from or work for a number of companies, but they are all motivated by the same desires and thus, really, you only have one choice. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”companies”,”Creative”]
Source: https://maryrosecook.com/blog/post/the-c-word-2

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-31-2018

Compassionate Capitalist Coffee Break – Seed Stage Investors

Forget compassionate capitalism, just some fairness will do

Saving Capitalism by Robert Reich could have ended up being the usual rant against the excesses of capitalism and capitalists. His argument that large companies in collusion with regulators and government officials have exploited the free market system for massive personal gains comes with the force of his personal experience as secretary of labour in the Clinton administration, as well as reams of relevant data. Osvald Bjelland founded and runs Xynteo, an Oslo-based consulting firm that advises companies on how doing good for society can be good for their bottom lines as well. As a serial entrepreneur who sold an earlier start-up to Citibank, it does sound strange for him to be critical of the capitalist system. Finally, over the weekend, N.R. Narayana Murthy, co-founder of Infosys, one of India’s most influential entrepreneurs and a poster boy for how capitalism can spawn a thousand millionaires, led some of the company’s founders in abstaining from voting in favour of a board proposal to hike the salary of the company’s chief operating officer U.B. Pravin Rao by 35% to Rs12.5 crore. Reich is even more critical of the system that served the US and most of Western society for well over a century. Before the current round of hand-wringing against capitalism took wing, the system did deliver incredible growth to all those countries that adopted Adam Smith’s laissez faire doctrine. In a country like India where for centuries, two meals a day was the ambition of millions, today people demand a share of the wealth they are helping create for the companies they work in. The virtual defanging of unions, the unholy nexus between government and big business, and above all the limitless greed of a select few for more power, have all contributed to the prevailing angst about the existing rules of business. Now as more and more of those who may have been its biggest beneficiaries declare that it is broken, the need to fix it, is acquiring urgency. Perhaps it is too much to expect compassion from a system that is inherently Darwinian. We will settle for a fairer and more just arrangement.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”companies”]
Source: https://www.livemint.com/Opinion/K6RVjtcr1QX0DAQFvJZg6O/Forget-compassionate-capitalism-just-some-fairness-will-do.html

The Free-Market Fantasy

Instead of trying to get a handout from the government or make a quick buck on the stock market, Mackey says that companies need to roll up their sleeves and rethink how to run a business. Today, the dominant discourse governing discussion of markets, states, and companies is neoliberalism, and Mackey’s free-market business model and historical narrative fit neatly within this framework. As economic historian Karl Polanyi argued decades ago, capitalist markets are a product of state engineering, not nature. The history of industrial development in the United States, often considered the epicenter of free markets, demonstrates the political nature of markets. The history of market formation in the United States reveals an industrial structure supplied by goods and capital extracted from slave labor and facilitated through a state-sponsored, genocidal land grab. Far-reaching government legislation protected domestic markets and infant industries from external competition, and federal and state governments played a central role in the development of physical infrastructure and the creation of huge bodies of agricultural and industrial knowledge – all essential elements in the genesis of American industrial capitalism. At the same time, society’s greatest inventions and innovations of the past two hundred years – rockets to the moon, penicillin, computers, the Internet – were not bestowed upon us by lone entrepreneurs and firms operating in free markets under conditions of healthy competition. Companies produce influential innovations, but so do other institutions that operate outside the confines of the profit motive, competitive markets, and the bottom line. Designating the market as natural and the state as unnatural is a convenient fiction for those wedded to the status quo. The complexion of those markets depends on the balance of class forces at any given point in time. Free markets don’t exist and other institutions like states clearly matter. Free markets don’t exist, but maybe corporations are still the best, most sensible, way to heal the planet.

Keywords: [“Market”,”capitalism”,”Mackey”]
Source: https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/04/free-market-conscious-capitalism-government/

Even Stevens Makes Capitalism-With-a-Cause Work

Addressing nationwide food insecurity while creating a thriving restaurant business should be a Herculean task, but Michael McHenry tackles formidable projects several times a week. As the president of Even Stevens Sandwiches, McHenry exudes an unfailing optimism that’s carried the hip sandwich shop to six states with 20 locations-with many more scheduled to open in 2018. Craft sandwiches, a local vibe and a charitable cause have propelled Even Stevens to build an organization that employs hundreds and serves millions. Even Stevens opened its first location in downtown Salt Lake City in 2014 and introduced the concept of donating one sandwich for every sandwich sold. McHenry has an extensive background in the restaurant industry. He worked for 15 years in brand development, concept and operational performance before partnering with Even Stevens owner Steve Down to create the first restaurant in the industry that can correlate revenue with social impact. It took less than three years to sell and donate a million sandwiches, and by the end of 2017, Even Stevens had donated over two million sandwiches to more than 70 nonprofit organizations. The organizations place the order, often a $2,500 value, and the food is drop-shipped to the door with Even Stevens picking up the bill. Following a close second to the compassionate capitalism aspect of Even Stevens is McHenry’s enthusiasm for team development. Even Stevens donates around 100,000 sandwiches a month, and McHenry says overcoming challenges has contributed to the ongoing success of the brand. Each of the eight Even Stevens locations in Utah works with merchants from that area to provide a catalyst for the business community. McHenry says his job is to be a voice for social change, to find artisans in the food industry, to partner with nonprofits that are tackling food insecurity, and to find new neighborhoods where the sandwich shop can create a sustained impact.

Keywords: [“McHenry”,”Even”,”Stevens”]
Source: https://utahbusiness.com/even-stevens-shows-make-capitalism-cause-enterprises-work/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-01-2018

Human Anxiety in Late-Stage Capitalism – Consortiumnews

Superficial explanations for today’s social anxiety and political discontent miss the underlying reality: the crisis of late-stage capitalism in its frantic death throes, explains poet Phil Rockstroh. Although the question was proffered, the reporters and editors responsible for the articles remain resolutely obtuse to the obvious: The bughouse crazy environment of late-stage capitalist culture evokes classic fight-or-flight responses attendant to episodes of severe anxiety and panic attacks. The word panic has its derivation in reference to Pan, the Greek god of wilderness and wildness, of the animal body encoded within human beings and its attendant animalistic imperatives. A caged animal, even if the unfortunate creature endures captivity, is not the entity nature conceived; the living being has been reduced to A Thing That Waits For Lunch. Human beings, animals that we are, respond in a similar fashion. Experiencing anxiety is among the ways our innate animal spirits react to the capitalist cage. To cite one such groupthink example: homelessness is natural to the human condition and is a communally acceptable situation. The situation is only one of the numerous obscenities inherent to state capitalism. How is it then, liberals fail to grasp the fact that the Trump presidency is not an aberration; rather, his ascension to power should be regarded as being among the high probability variables of late-stage capitalism and empire building? The psychopathic, tangerine-tinged clown Trump is the embodiment of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, a development that is concomitant to over-expanded empires. The cultural milieu concomitant to capitalism is at the rotten root and noxious blossoming of the situation. When life is negotiated within a collective value system that devalues and deadens the individual’s inner life thus warps every human transaction, anomie descends, the worst among a people ascend to positions of power. Due to the reality that capitalism, on both an individual and collective basis, drives individuals into madness, all as the system destroys forest and field, ocean and sea and the soul-scape of all who live under its rapacious dominion, our plight comes down to this: We either struggle and strive, by and any and all means, to end the system – or it will end us.

Keywords: [“being”,”life”,”Trump”]
Source: https://consortiumnews.com/…/human-anxiety-in-late-stage-capitalism

L7 The Case Against Capitalism

Some additional considerations from a Marxist perspectiveYanis Varoufakis said in his article “How I became an erratic Marxist”If workers and employers ever succeed in commodifying labour fully, capitalism will perish. Then such expectation tends to undermine the intrinsic value of love and its importance in our non-material bond. So what Varoufakis may be alluding to is that one of the most important “non-material” contributions of labor is what we might call creativity: the ability to add value to some raw material, which is a pretty amazing quality of human behavior. In the same sense that we can’t quantify or commodify love or trust, we really can’t quantify or commodify that natural, unpredictable, inspirational creativity either. This isn’t entirely ignored in capitalism, where someone might pay millions for a Vermeer; there is an element of what Marx called “fetishism” involved here, to be sure, but there is also a very reasonable awe invoked by Vermeer’s profound and rare talent, and a consequent attempt to quantify what simply cannot be captured. Thus there is really no upper limit to such capture efforts, which is why such creations are effectively “priceless. ” Sometimes this valuation is tied mainly to scarcitybut that’s simply not the whole picture. So if all labor were completely commodified by employers and employees in the sense described, then the very qualities that add value to goods and services will be completely excised. Take love out of a marriage, and what do you have? Take trust out of a friendship, and what do you have? Take creativity out of the means of production, and what do you have? This could be what Varoufakis means when he says “capitalism will perish. ” That special human ingredient that fuels the capitalist enterprise and generates value will be extinguished through the commoditization of all laborso how could capitalism continue? Varoufakis could also just be alluding to the complete alienation of labor through its treatment as mechanized, tedious, robotically monotonous production by capitalistsanother important theme in Marx. Or he could be referring to Marx’s predictions about the consequences of monopolies and an increasingly centralized means of production, which in turn prod the steadily impoverished masses into open revolt.

Keywords: [“Varoufakis”,”value”,”capitalism”]
Source: http://level-7.org/Challenges/Capitalism

Books

It’s called Faith and Fortune because faith provides the fuel that energizes these people as they strive to do business better. All of them have faith in the goodness of people and faith in the possibility of change. Most of all, they have faith that corporations, guided by strong values and a dedication to serving others, can become a powerful force for good in the world. Faith and Fortune argues that an exciting new model of conducting business is taking hold, not only in small, socially responsible companies but also inside well-known FORTUNE 500 companies like Herman Miller, Starbucks, Southwest Airlines, Timberland and UPS. Bit by bit, almost imperceptibly, this new model is replacing a century-old approach that was rooted in the industrial era. At once realistic and inspiring, Faith and Fortune profiles companies and people who represent the best of business and exemplify these new values. When Roone Arledge became president of ABC News in 1977, he took over a second-rate news organization that lacked the reputation, ratings and star power of its well-established competitors, CBS News and ABC News. Arledge, who had made his name as an innovative producer of sports, went on to develop bold new ways of delivering news with such programs as Nightline, 20/20, This Week and Prime Time Live, and to assemble a galaxy of stars: Peter Jennings, Ted Koppel, Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, Sam Donaldson and David Brinkley. Published in 1994 by Little Brown, The House that Roone Built: The Inside Story of ABC News tells the dramatic story of Arledge’s rise and, eventually, his fall from power. It also explores the evolution of network news from a profession, in which producers and reports saw themselves as serving the public, into a business that played to the crowd. Since ABC introduced Monday Night Football to television in 1970, Monday nights in America have never been the same. Published in 1988 by William Morrow, Monday Night Mayhem: The Inside Story of ABC’s Monday Night Football tells the entertaining story of how ABC and the NFL together turned an otherwise ordinary football game into a national institution with a faithful following of millions. I wrote Monday Night Mayhem with my friend Bill Carter, who covers television for The New York Times.

Keywords: [“new”,”Faith”,”companies”]
Source: http://www.marcgunther.com/books

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

What Is Capitalism? Part 2

Another Jurassic World is Possible

The Jurassic Park franchise has, in some ways, had an easier time at this. The only real consistency is that dinosaurs, resurrected with genetic engineering to populate a theme park, manage to run amok in the present day. The first three films had little connection to one another narratively, allowing for a more flexible accumulation of sequels. It’s an incredibly self-conscious film eager to make the analogy between the spectacle of an amusement park and the spectacle of a summer blockbuster apparent to anyone unfamiliar with Disney World. If Jurassic World the theme park stands in for Jurassic World the major motion picture, then we’re faced with an uncomfortable situation. The park’s attendees represent us, the audience, and so our desires, communicated through focus groups and attendance figures, are implicated in the park’s disaster at the claws of I-Rex. They sit a bunch of people down and they ask them, “What can we do to make the dinosaurs more entertaining for you? What would make you tell a friend to come to Jurassic World?” And their answer is, of course, “We want to see something bigger, faster, louder, more vicious; we want a killer.” And they get what what they ask for. Or as Alan Grant says in Jurassic Park III, “What John Hammond and InGen did at Jurassic Park is create genetically-engineered theme-park monsters. Nothing more, and nothing less.” I wish, in our organic-obsessed times, we had been allowed to linger on the question of intervention in nature. Irrfan Khan got the only really interesting role as Simon Masrani, the park’s CEO. He seems modeled after Richard Branson – suit, no tie – a cool, compassionate capitalist, the kind of executive who interrupts revenue reports to ask whether the animals are happy. Jurassic Park was, at bottom, about the hubris of such rich dreamers. Since the park is actually off the ground in this installment, I anticipated seeing a struggle between Masrani’s desire to appear down to earth and his fated role to pursue the park’s success, even as things start to go wrong – the contradictions of being, as Marx put it, “Capital personified.” In fact, the irony of having a personal aesthetic of authenticity and integrity combined with a duty to deliver craven special effects thrills might have given Trevorrow an opportunity for self-reflection on his own creative role. If only Jurassic World were brave or clever enough to escape this pen, instead of resigning itself to lumbering along.

Keywords: [“Park”,”more”,”film”]
Source: https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/06/jurassic-park-review-trevorrow-pratt-howard

Books

It’s called Faith and Fortune because faith provides the fuel that energizes these people as they strive to do business better. All of them have faith in the goodness of people and faith in the possibility of change. Most of all, they have faith that corporations, guided by strong values and a dedication to serving others, can become a powerful force for good in the world. Faith and Fortune argues that an exciting new model of conducting business is taking hold, not only in small, socially responsible companies but also inside well-known FORTUNE 500 companies like Herman Miller, Starbucks, Southwest Airlines, Timberland and UPS. Bit by bit, almost imperceptibly, this new model is replacing a century-old approach that was rooted in the industrial era. At once realistic and inspiring, Faith and Fortune profiles companies and people who represent the best of business and exemplify these new values. When Roone Arledge became president of ABC News in 1977, he took over a second-rate news organization that lacked the reputation, ratings and star power of its well-established competitors, CBS News and ABC News. Arledge, who had made his name as an innovative producer of sports, went on to develop bold new ways of delivering news with such programs as Nightline, 20/20, This Week and Prime Time Live, and to assemble a galaxy of stars: Peter Jennings, Ted Koppel, Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, Sam Donaldson and David Brinkley. Published in 1994 by Little Brown, The House that Roone Built: The Inside Story of ABC News tells the dramatic story of Arledge’s rise and, eventually, his fall from power. It also explores the evolution of network news from a profession, in which producers and reports saw themselves as serving the public, into a business that played to the crowd. Since ABC introduced Monday Night Football to television in 1970, Monday nights in America have never been the same. Published in 1988 by William Morrow, Monday Night Mayhem: The Inside Story of ABC’s Monday Night Football tells the entertaining story of how ABC and the NFL together turned an otherwise ordinary football game into a national institution with a faithful following of millions. I wrote Monday Night Mayhem with my friend Bill Carter, who covers television for The New York Times.

Keywords: [“new”,”Faith”,”companies”]
Source: http://www.marcgunther.com/books/

Compassionate Capitalist, Couple Biz Partners, Bulletproof Dave Asprey

Karen Y. Rands is a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing and is an Economist, Investor, and Entrepreneur. She draws upon both her academic ‘book knowledge’ and her experience as an ‘intrapreneur’ during her tenure at IBM to managing a very active angel investor network. Karen has advising hundreds of entrepreneurs and business and is the Leader and Advocate for the Compassionate Capitalist Movement. She defines “Compassionate Capitalist” as “A person who primarily invests their money, and when feasible their time, resources, knowledge, and experience, into an entrepreneurial endeavor to bring innovation to market, create jobs, and ultimately create wealth for the investors and founders.” She serves as the Managing Director for the National Network of Angel Investors and is a frequent speaker and mentor. Karen won the Advocate of the Year award in 2016 at the Flight to Freedom Summit in San Ramon, California, for her work to promote Compassionate Capitalism. The NYC-based production company provides original entertainment concepts, immersive theatrical experiences, and custom show productions for large corporate clients. Fabiola has appeared in countless network television shows, commercials, music videos, concerts, and more. She has become an independent creative director for various production companies, special events, projects, stage shows and concerts. Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley investor and entrepreneur, a professional biohacker, and the creator of Bulletproof Coffee. He hosts Bulletproof Radio, a nationally syndicated radio show and #1 ranked podcast with over 50 million downloads. Dave serves as Chairman of the Silicon Valley Health Institute and spent 15 years and over $1 million to hack his own biology. His writing has been published by Fortune and the New York Times, and he’s been featured in The Financial Times, Men’s Health, Rolling Stone, Marie Claire, Vogue, Fast Company, Women’s Health, and dozens more.

Keywords: [“Investor”,”show”,”Dave”]
Source: http://schoolforstartupsradio.com/2017/10/compassionate_capitalist/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Socialism Makes People Selfish

Forget compassionate capitalism, just some fairness will do

Saving Capitalism by Robert Reich could have ended up being the usual rant against the excesses of capitalism and capitalists. Osvald Bjelland founded and runs Xynteo, an Oslo-based consulting firm that advises companies on how doing good for society can be good for their bottom lines as well. As a serial entrepreneur who sold an earlier start-up to Citibank, it does sound strange for him to be critical of the capitalist system. Finally, over the weekend, N.R. Narayana Murthy, co-founder of Infosys, one of India’s most influential entrepreneurs and a poster boy for how capitalism can spawn a thousand millionaires, led some of the company’s founders in abstaining from voting in favour of a board proposal to hike the salary of the company’s chief operating officer U.B. Pravin Rao by 35% to Rs12.5 crore. Murthy later clarified that the decision stemmed from their belief in compassionate capitalism and his remarks may well serve as a caution for companies not just in India but beyond as well: “I have always felt that every senior management person of an Indian corporation has to show self-restraint in his or her compensation and perquisites. This is necessary if we have to make compassionate capitalism acceptable to a majority of Indians who are poor. Without compassionate capitalism, this country cannot create jobs and solve the problem of poverty.” Reich is even more critical of the system that served the US and most of Western society for well over a century. “The threat to capitalism is no longer communism or fascism but a steady undermining of the trust modern societies need for growth and stability,” he writes. Before the current round of hand-wringing against capitalism took wing, the system did deliver incredible growth to all those countries that adopted Adam Smith’s laissez faire doctrine. In a country like India where for centuries, two meals a day was the ambition of millions, today people demand a share of the wealth they are helping create for the companies they work in. Now as more and more of those who may have been its biggest beneficiaries declare that it is broken, the need to fix it, is acquiring urgency. Perhaps it is too much to expect compassion from a system that is inherently Darwinian. We will settle for a fairer and more just arrangement.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”companies”]
Source: http://www.livemint.com/Opinion/K6RVjtcr1QX0DAQFvJZg6O/Forget-compassionate-capitalism-just-some-fairness-will-do.html

Can compassionate capitalists really win?

Raj Sisodia, head of the Conscious Capitalism Institute, believes companies that focus on the bottom line, instead of on employees’ needs, will fall behind. After years of layoffs, cutbacks, and closures in the corporate sector, it’s hard to imagine that any competitive American company really puts the needs of its employees before its profits. Born in India, Sisodia was educated there and at Columbia University in New York, where he received his PhD, and he’s currently professor of marketing at Bentley University in Waltham, Mass. In May, Bentley will host the third annual international conference sponsored by the Conscious Capitalism Institute, of which Sisodia is chairman and co-founder. Conscious Capitalism is defined by four characteristics. The third element is conscious leadership, which is driven by purpose and by service to people, and not by power or by personal enrichment. The fourth is a conscious culture, which really embodies all of these elements: trust, caring, compassion, and authenticity. Those two CEOs said first of all, “We are not going to lay off anybody. That’s number one. Second, we are going to protect the weakest within the system, which are the part-time workers. They will not be asked to take any kind of pay cut, any kind of benefit deduction, or even reduction in their hours, because they are the most vulnerable in the system. And then all the salaried people will take an across-the-board pay freeze, or even a pay reduction.” The sacrifice was shared equally between the people who could most afford to do it, and the weakest were protected. It’s not a drastic choice anymore between Communism and capitalism; everybody believes in free markets and free people. The question is how do we refine it? How do we create the best possible kind of free markets and free people? Beyond that, the median age crossed 40 for the first time in 1989. If you look at what happens to people as they age, mid-life and beyond, it’s not so much about, “How much can I accumulate?” and “What’s in it for me?” They start asking questions about meaning and purpose and legacy. If you go back 150 years, slavery was acceptable to most people. People are migrating, when they have a choice, to businesses that do offer meaning and purpose and a positive impact all around.

Keywords: [“people”,”Capitalism”,”Conscious”]
Source: http://fortune.com/2011/03/30/can-compassionate-capitalists-really-win/

David Meltzer Bio

With expertise across many industry verticals, he is uniquely positioned as a world-renowned thought leader, business strategist and leading humanitarian. Dave has created a platform that allows him to communicate with everyone from college students to c-suite executives by using his principles for business and life: gratitude, empathy, accountability, and effective communication. Utilizing these four principles every day allows Dave to live by his mission, “Make a lot of money, help a lot of people, and have a lot of fun.” Prominent Sports ExecutiveDave is currently the Chief Executive Officer at Sports 1 Marketing, a firm he co-founded with Hall of Fame Quarterback Warren Moon. His mission is implemented into each of the firm’s business services, which include, endorsement deals, sponsorship and gifting, business consulting, corporate equity ownership, transitional services, brand endorsements and licensing, athlete and celebrity alignment, among others. Sports 1 Marketing is currently involved with several sports and entertainment projects such as NFL Player’s Association, Pro Football Hall of Fame, Super Bowl, Athlete Network, Shmoop, The Master’s, Spartan Races, Internships.com, and countless others. He launched his career in sports at the world’s most notable sports agency, Leigh Steinberg Sports & Entertainment, serving positions as CEO, where along with Leigh and Warren, negotiated over $2 billion in sports and entertainment contracts. Keynote SpeakerBeing on stage has always been an easy platform for Dave to share his charisma, inspiration, and intelligence in front of a crowd of any size. A combination of Dave’s situational knowledge from his career and life journey has led to Dave as a keynote in front of Fortune 500 companies, top business conferences, prestigious universities, and sports seminars. He has a dynamic range of topics from; principles to success, sports technology, sports business, leadership, empowerment, negotiations, sales training, team development, marketing, and countless others. HumanitarianEvery business project that Dave works with requires having a charitable component or partner; which helps Dave continue to live by his mission. Recently, he was recognized for his efforts and honored at Variety’s Unite4:Humanity event as the Sports Humanitarian of the year.

Keywords: [“Sports”,”business”,”Dave”]
Source: http://www.davemeltzer.com/david-meltzer-bio/