J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-09-2018

Three Dimensional Coaching

Capitalism, socialism and dysability – Simon Stevens’ Viewpoint

I am always been interested in whether people with impairments were better off under capitalism or socialism. These systems replaced feudalism, where productivity was measured in terms of output of families where people with impairments could make some contribution without being seen as defective. The question is how did each idealogical system deal with people with impairments as defective people. Under capitalism, people would have to fend for themselves. People with impairments had the freedom to try to find work that suited them or in large family situations, they were looked after by their family. 

Those who profited from capitalism often set up charities, to help them get into heaven, which looked after people with impairments, often in a residential setting. How the socialist state deals with people with impairments they regard as defective is solely dependent on the moral appetite of the regime. Corbyn’s proposal within an era where people with impairments, which is technically most people, wish to self-define themselves as defective, is to keep them at home on a minimum income with minimum support, encouraging assisted suicide or mercy killings as a way out. In the reality of 2018 in the UK, we have a mixed economy, somewhere between capitalism and socialism. People with impairments enjoy the support provided by a state-controlled health and social care system, with the freedom to be enterprising under a mostly free market system. 

I believe it is this balance that has enabled the slow meaningful inclusion of people with impairments into society as the idea that people with impairments are naturally defective is being challenged. If I had to choose to live under poor capitalism or poor socialism, it would have to be capitalism because I would have a fighting chance to have some control over my life as oppose to simply being locked away by the state. 

Keywords: [“people”,”impairments”,”defective”]
Source: https://dysability.blog/2018/06/24/capitalism-socialism-and-dysability

Unilever’s New Model of Capitalism

Citizens of the world are less and less supportive of capitalism solely based on maximizing short-term profits. More and more companies are acknowledging their obligation to all the participants in their business, from the shareholders, to the employees, to the communities they operate in. Unilever is one such company, realizing and owning their need to contribute to the societal welfare and environmental impact for the countries it operates in. They want to propose a new model of capitalism that focuses on the long term, in which companies try to solve social and environmental problems and give equal importance to the needs of communities, as well as their shareholders. Unilever has over 400 brands worldwide under its umbrella, ranging from foods to household cleaners, including Lipton, Knorr, Dove, and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream; sold in almost every country, with two billion people using a Unilever product every day. 

Unilever developed the brand Lifebuoy with a marketing strategy based on campaigns to educate mothers and children to adopt this simple gesture. It has a triple advantage – the consumer is healthier, the company sees a decline in health care costs for its employees, and Unilever benefits from increased sales of soap. Unilever’s greatest impact is within the agricultural sector. Worldwide, the company purchases 12% of the world’s black tea, 3% of the tomatoes, and 3% of the palm oil. Unilever is connected with more than one million small farmers alone. 

They are able to work directly with the farmers to improve their productivity through a partnership with local and international organizations, expand their distribution efficiency, and train them in new techniques. Oxfam estimates the number of small-businesses that Unilever touches is more than half a billion, and improving their lives and businesses is an effective way to reduce poverty. 

Keywords: [“Unilever”,”company”,”less”]
Source: https://borgenproject.org/unilevers-new-model-of-capitalism

Understanding the anxious mind

Extrapolating from a study he had completed on toddlers,he suspected that the most edgy infants were more likely to grow up to be inhibited,shy and anxious. Kagan went on to find many more such children,and watched a big chunk of them run into trouble with anxiety or other problems as they grew up. AGE OF ANXIETY. The tenuousness of modern life can make anyone feel overwrought. Now,with thousands losing jobs and homes,futures threatened by everything from diminishing retirement funds to global warming – it often feels as if ours is the Age of Anxiety. 

Psychologists have put the assumptions about innate temperament on firmer footing,and they have also demonstrated that some of us,like Baby 19,are born anxious – or,more accurately,born predisposed to be anxious. With slight variations,they all have reached similar conclusions: that babies differ according to inborn temperament; that 15 to 20 per cent of them will react strongly to novel people or situations; and that strongly reactive babies are more likely to grow up to be anxious. WHAT IS ANXIETY. Anxiety is not fear,exactly,because fear is focused on something right in front of you,a real and objective danger. When the fear starts to interfere with functioning,worrying turns into a clinical anxiety disorder,of which there are several forms: panic,social anxiety,phobia,obsessive-compulsive,post-traumatic stress and a catch-all called generalised anxiety disorder. 

Taken together,they make anxiety the most common mental illness. COPING WITH ANXIETY. Having all the earmarks of anxiety in the brain does not always translate into a subjective experience of anxiety. In the modern world,the anxious temperament does offer certain benefits: caution,introspection,the capacity to work alone. An anxious temperament might serve a more exalted function too. 

Keywords: [“anxiety”,”temperament”,”anxious”]
Source: https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/understanding-the…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 06-23-2018

Why Capitalism is The Most Compassionate System On Earth

Understanding the debate around ‘compassionate capitalism’

NR Narayana Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. As the West debated unconscionably high executive salaries and compensation, the fabled investor Warren Buffett observed that the way to get fatcat corporates to change was to embarrass them. Since Sikka made his announcement on August 18, a wider debate has raged over whether a founder who has stepped down and is not a dominant shareholder, ought to indulge in the kind of public campaign that NRN mounted – rather than making an unambiguous choice between total detachment and committing himself to addressing Infy’s challenges as part of the board. The debate has also touched on issues of conformity to a company’s core cultural values and ethos. Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. 

Compensation for the top deck has continued to soar higher above the company median in some of India’s celebrated private banks – at least one of which, interestingly, had an Infy-like culture of granting stock until some years ago. The National Stock Exchange of India Ltd was in a controversy regarding payouts to top executives. The counter-argument, of course, is that these practices are not illegal, and have the sanction of the board of directors and shareholders. In his annual letter to shareholders in 2006, Buffett made the point that compensation reform will only occur if the largest institutional shareholders demand a fresh look at the system. In India, the largest shareholder is LIC, which is owned by the government. 

Regulators in India have been careful not to intervene – even though the central bank has, in the past, shot down proposals from private and foreign banks to offer sign-on bonuses and parachutes designed to protect bosses who are fired. That’s the question shareholders – especially institutional shareholders – must put to those on the boards and the compensation and audit committees of many Indian firms. 

Keywords: [“company”,”shareholder”,”India”]
Source: https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/understanding-the-debate-around-compassionate-capitalism-n-r-narayana-murthy-infosys-vishal-sikka-n-r-narayana-murthy-4805857/

This conglomerate is compromised of 25 booming companies fully registered in the United Kingdom. These are social Enterprise companies that aim at making available basic services to the most disadvantaged communities in and around the globe begining with Uganda with head offiçe at Kitintale, Kampala. The compassionate Capitalism philosophy used by development channel is relatively new to Africa and Uganda in particular. Simply put, it’s where you get paid for making a purchase. Starting with Uganda as the base in Africa, Charles Lambert, the founder of this organisation and chairman of foreign investors in Uganda, has stimulated the local population by opening up the opportunity to become a shareholder in this conglomerate through a one time risk free investment. 

How this works:Through the one time purchase of the amazingly unique NoDropout iPad,at only 1,008,000Ugx, you get two after-sale benefits freely from the company. This opportunity is opened up to a limited number of individuals. Besides being a shareholder, members will be opened up to various services offered by each individual company within the conglomerate. Students will have the opportunity to earn an income after accomplishing tasks which will be sent to them on the app being designed and unique to Development Channel. There are also teacher programs, single parent services, travel services and opportunities, startup capital financing with no collateral, house construction services just to mention but a few. 

Development channel is also going to be among the largest employers in Uganda by making available 5000 jobs in the call center being established in Bukoto, Uganda. Hurry to take up this risk free investment opportunity and earn a consistent monthly income while the opportunity lasts. 

Keywords: [“Uganda”,”opportunity”,”services”]
Source: https://steemit.com/uganda/@menorah/compassionate-capitalism

Integral to Compassionate Capitalism 06/12 by Karen Rands

Every CEO & Angel Investor needs to hear the insights Karen and Jim will discuss on this segment of the Compassionate Capitalist Radio Podcast. All of that is described in the book and Jim shares tactical and strategic plans for CEOs in his book, Igniting Purpose Driven Leadership, that can lead to sustainable and profitable growth by figuring out how to shift your team to abundance by unleashing their creativity. This is important for investors to understand as well because if the team is too focused on just one innovation, they risk stagnation a few years in to the project and hitting a plateau that will limit their ability to produce the return on investment you expect. About Jim Nevada: Jim is the CEO of the Nevada Group, which helps executives create a purpose-driven culture that attracts and keeps top talent, so they can experience rapid growth and higher profitability. Jim has extensive executive experience, including 20 years as Chief Financial Officer of publicly-traded and privately-held professional service firms, and served as President in one of the largest firms in the sector. 

He also has many years of experience in M&A, having worked on numerous transactions, including some of the largest deals in the sector. About Karen Rands: Karen has been working with entrepreneurs on growth and expansion strategies and access to capital for over 15 years. She has been active in the Angel Investor and Venture Capital community for over 10 years. Her best selling book, Inside Secrets to Angel Investing, is the foundation for the Compassionate Capitalist Movement. 

Keywords: [“years”,”Jim”,”Investor”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands/2018/06/12/igniting-purpose-driven-leadership–integral-to-compassionate-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 06-19-2018

Conscious Capitalism and Compassion – Wolff Professional Services

One of the best moments of my life occurred last week at The Mindful Leadership Summit in D.C. I attended a break out session titled Conscious Capitalism. As a child, I started creating businesses in my head. Never very interested in things that just filled my time or entertained me, but in things that affected the world. Creating businesses to meet people’s needs, creating jobs, and making things is what moved me. 

I persisted but with less joy than I once had. I have had my own business for 20 years, actually a number of my own businesses through out my life, but the business that provided for me and my son for the past 20 years. Leaving me at odds with my desire to love the power of businesses, but the inner knowledge that the way we do business, is askew. Remembering the men and women of my childhood, their anger about money, their resentment toward power, sometimes made it strange to be in business. I still loved business, and saw it’s potential. 

I cried in that break out session on Conscious Capitalism, because my heart was renewed. There are communities and leaders who are actively evolving the great gifts of business and creating tools for leaders to become conscious, and these leaders bring their intentional wisdom to the drivers of economy that lift people up. Read the book: Conscious Capitalism, join the communities, attend the events. This is compassionate business, compassionate leadership, mindful leadership at it’s best. Cheers to greater purpose and meaning in our world, and in our businesses! 

Keywords: [“business”,”money”,”businesses”]
Source: https://wolffprofessionalservices.com/conscious-capitalism-and…

A Defense of Capitalism and Free Markets as Millennials Flock to Socialism in Droves – Investment Watch Blog

A once prosperous and fully functioning democratic nation in South America became proof positive of the ultimate failure of socialism. Another South American country teaches us a valuable lesson on the failure of socialism. As America’s Millennials are increasingly drawn to socialism and disgusted by capitalism, it is important to point to the recent collapse of Brazil. Socialism breeds corruption and promotes criminal politicians to the top. Despite these two telling examples from South America, Millennials in the U.S. 

no longer see socialism as a dirty word. Mark Thornton, Senior Fellow at the Mises Institute and Book Review Editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics wrote an informative piece on mises.org bemoaning young Americans’ desire for socialism in the United States. A recent GenForward survey quantified Millennials’ support for socialism. Socialism is viewed as a kind of nationwide safe space, according to thin-skinned Millennials. For comparison’s sake, over half of Baby Boomers favor capitalism and only 26 percent support socialism. 

The numbers are in and America’s young adults appear to want socialism. Similar conclusions were found in a 2015 Reason-Rupe poll which revealed 58 percent of the same age group approved of socialism, up dramatically from a 2011 Pew poll that found 49 percent of young Americans viewing socialism positively. Supporters of socialism claim that capitalism cannot be trusted because humans are inherently greedy and selfish. 

Keywords: [“socialism”,”government”,”capitalism”]
Source: http://www.investmentwatchblog.com/a-defense-of-capitalism-and-free…

How Individuals and Corporations Participate

Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. 

From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives. 

Keywords: [“company”,”invest”,”Compassionate”]
Source: https://www.karenrands.co/compassionate-capitalism-how-individuals…

WWHOME DE ebooks channels

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Ap chemistry free response answers 2011.conceptual physics rotational mechanics answers. Study guide answer key for glencoe earth science chapter 27.concept review energy transfer answer key. Ap environmental science free response answers 2003.practice b answer sheet geometry lesson 9.multiple choice questions answers logistics management. Answers to pretest atls s.social studies answers. A concise introduction to logic answers chapter 8.luenberger solution chapter 3 answers. 

Fema test answers 700.ngse papers with answers. Financial algebra workbook answer key 250.daily language review answer key grade 7.pearson anatomy and physiology lab manual answers. 

Keywords: [“answer”,”solution”,”edition”]
Source: http://wwhome.de/compassionate/capitalism/compassionate_capitalism_barnes…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 06-08-2018

Largest legal pot farm may mark end of cannabis industry’s “Wild West” phase – ThinkProgress

The first phase of construction on the Massachusetts Medical Cannabis Center, set to begin in March, is a 130,000-square-foot building, a quarter of which is warehouse space. If Americann’s complicated play for a new, large-scale pot business model is successful, Barton and his investors will get many millions of dollars richer. Just like mall owners don’t make Hot Topic belts themselves, Barton’s firm is a landlord that won’t grow an ounce of pot itself. Barton and Keogh have been trying to get the MMCC off the ground for years, working with a marijuana business veteran from early 2014 to refine its approach to building a pot real estate empire. Colorado pot entrepreneur Jay Czarkowski had only been Americann’s CEO for about two months when the firm shifted into pot real estate work in 2014. 

The MMCC will give Americann’s partners huge influence in the state’s medicinal cannabis market, concentrating control in ways that come with pluses and minuses for consumers. When the first greenhouse opens, Coastal Compassion will rapidly become the largest supplier in the state, potentially controlling an outright majority of the current demand for medical pot. As the market grows and matures over time, Keogh expects the MMCC facilities will provide roughly 20 percent of all the medical cannabis that Bay Staters buy - smaller than its initial market share, but still plenty large enough to be a dominant player. Such huge scale and concentrated market share implies a very different pot economy from what legalization and medicinal advocates might have had in mind just a few years ago. With cannabis still illegal federally, and pot businesses thus unable to access the basic financial services all businesses need to maximize growth, the emerging pot industry has often been compared to the Wild West. 

The big money is coming in, eager to wipe out boutique operations and hippie ideals with venture capital leverage and factory-style pot farms. As the big-box-store model of pot capitalism puts down roots, the financial proceeds of legalization will become concentrated in fewer and fewer hands. 

Keywords: [“pot”,”Americann”,”facility”]
Source: https://thinkprogress.org/nations-largest-legal-pot-farm-moves…

How to do good and well – Eraldo Cavalli

Salesforce story embodies well the new paradigm of compassionate capitalism. Many of Salesforce executives joined the company from Oracle Corporation where they had experimented how starting a philanthropic program requires more than just putting a fuck load of cash behind it. In 2000, just one year after founding Salesforce, Benioff started Salesforce.com Foundation to coordinate the company efforts around grants, donations and employee activities to serve the communities. Salesforce foundation received 1% of Saleforce.com equity, quite an unusual move which generated a vast pool of resources when the company IPO’ed in 2004 at a valuation of around $1.1B, and even more today that Salesforce.com is valued above $10bn. This 1% equity gives a strong moral message about what the company cares about and how philanthropy is deeply rooted in Salesforce identity. 

The executives Saleforce.com hires know they will be asked about community involvement during their interviews as Salesforce screens the candidates based on their philanthropic values, but at the same time new hires actively reach out to Salesforce because of its social impact mission. Salesforce offers employees to use 1% of their time to volunteer on whatever they want to. First week orientation includes half a day of service work at one of the many nonprofits that Salesforce has provided free products to. Through a dedicated program called Power of Us Salesforce offers 10 free accounts to any nonprofit organization and sells additional accounts at 80% discount. Salesforce allows employees flexibility in the organizations they want to support but at the same time there are some areas where they feel they can make a bigger impact: one of these areas is local schools STEM education. 

Salesforce provides start-up capital and free services to build technology centers in schools. 1% of the working time definitely doesn’t impact the corporate performance negatively, if looking at Salesforce numbers one could say that it actually improves performance. 

Keywords: [“Salesforce”,”company”,”employee”]
Source: https://eraldo.blog/2018/05/23/compassionate-capitalism

In our opinion: Meaningful work for inmates points to lower recidivism

While prison labor has a long, exploitative history, Utah legislators and employers should ensure both inmates on work release programs and former prisoners have access to jobs, competitive wages and compassionate mentoring to help address the overwhelming problem of recidivism. The reports highlight a model of work release programs for inmates used in a handful of states such as Indiana and Nevada, and it’s an initiative legislators should consider as they work toward the long-term project of criminal justice reform. The Bureau of Prisons runs a program called Federal Prison Industries that pays inmates less than a dollar an hour for hard labor, often on an assembly line. This model regards prisoners as a source of cheap labor, forcing inmates to work difficult jobs without benefits or protection. In Utah, prisoners are not allowed to work at local businesses. 

Across the country, prisoners can also be contracted – for less than a dollar an hour – to work for the profit of major companies such as Whole Foods, McDonald’s and Walmart. Some states have adopted more empowering methods of employment, and compassionate work release programs illuminate the ethical path forward for the prison industry. Prisons should see to it that all inmates receive job training to prepare them to enter the workforce upon release. Replacing Federal Prison Industries labor with work release programs allows inmates to leave prison for the day to work for minimum wage, at the very least. This includes offering inmates greater access to job training, opportunities to work with competitive wages and compassionate mentoring to help citizens gain the skills they need to succeed. 

Public policy analysis suggests work release programs for inmates correlate with reduced recidivism and increased likelihood of employment after incarceration. Replacing exploitative labor practices with compassionate models of employment will better help inmates escape the revolving door of incarceration and get on their feet with the skills they need. 

Keywords: [“inmates”,”work”,”prison”]
Source: https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900010388/in-our-opinion…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-24-2018

The sound of capitalism

Read Steve Yates’s rundown of the tracks that changed hip hop at our blog. The latest album by the twin titans of hip hop has been a record-breaking success. A total of 290,000 copies were downloaded that week, and when CDs are taken into account, the album’s sales approached the 450,000 mark. Originating in the South Bronx in New York City in the late 1970s, when performers began rapping over looped beats taken from soul and funk records, hip hop has since journeyed right into the heart of mainstream culture. Jay-Z is married to Beyoncé Knowles, queen of R&B, and together they form the most influential power couple in global music. 

His wealth is estimated by Forbes at around $450m, and he has had 12 US number one albums. For its detractors, this materialism is one of rap’s three deadly sins, along with its violence and misogyny. When the riots broke out across Britain this summer, many saw hip hop’s celebration of materialism as one of the key causes. 

Keywords: [“hop”,”hip”,”materialism”]
Source: https://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/magazine/hip-hop-bling…

GCSE English Literature

Sheila is shocked when she learns that she had a part to play in Eva’s death. Gerald is being judgemental of her even though he has not yet taken responsibility for his own actions. Mr Birling refuses to take any responsibility for Eva Smith’s death. Eric shows that he takes responsibility for his actions in the final act of the play. Whilst Gerald and Eric’s parents are enjoying being in the clear, Eric still takes the matter of Eva’s death very seriously. 

He is even brave enough to tell his mother that she should feel responsible too. Sybil Birling will not take any responsibility for the death of Eva Smith even after she has been questioned by the Inspector. The audience would know that she is in no position to be questioning the behaviour of anyone else given her own treatment of Eva Smith and lack of social responsibility. This is a practice the privileged Birlings would be used to. 

Keywords: [“responsibility”,”take”,”Eva”]
Source: https://www.bbc.com/education/guides/zpf3gk7/revision/2

Entrepreneurs + Investors + Funded Innovation + Generational Wealth + Compassionate Capitalism

History has shown that the Greatest Wealth is Created through Entrepreneurism. Every Innovation that improves our lives came from an Entrepreneur with an idea; a strategy to succeed; and the funding to execute. The Good News: You don’t have to start a great company when you can invest in a great company and reap the same rewards as the founders. Recent regulatory changes have made that easier than ever to happen. We help Entrepreneurs and Investors create their legacy in the innovation they bring to market and the generational wealth they create. 

The men and women who take the road less traveled and invest in exciting private companies before they go public, have the opportunity that few realize – create wealth, leave a legacy of innovation, and have personal pride in knowing they impacted their community with new jobs and opportunities. 

Keywords: [“create”,”company”,”Innovation”]
Source: https://www.karenrands.co

Towards a socially engaged mindfulness

Stephen Stanley was recently asked to provide an introduction to a screening of the documentary ‘Happy’. Apparently a ‘turn to happiness’ – or perhaps a near-obsession with happiness – is happening across government, science, therapy and popular culture. The general idea is that: the purpose of life is to be happy, we all want to be happy, and that to be happy, be need to do certain things. We have a right to be happy, and a moral obligation or duty to be happy, for ourselves and others. If we fail to find happiness, we have failed in life. 

We have lost the connection with the Middle English word ‘happ’ which means chance, luck or fortune. The idea that happiness is what happens to us, and is beyond our control, goes against the grain of contemporary understanding. This ‘turn to happiness’ has taken place across at least three domains. 

Keywords: [“Happy”,”happiness”,”fail”]
Source: https://socialmindfulness.wordpress.com

Dutch Healthcare Shames Down Syndrome Man. For Costing ‘Too Much…’ » Louder With Crowder

There is no room within the progressive-socialist movement for those with Down syndrome. By now their hatred is as obvious as Chris Christie’s diabetes. In case you need more convincing, here’s a video of a DS man being shamed by the Netherlands for costing too much in healthcare. For people who claim money and capitalism are evil, they sure do like putting a price tag on someone’s life. I suppose this chap should be thanking his lucky stars he didn’t end up like Charlie Gard. 

This is the twisted world of healthcare leftists, like Bernie Sanders and his socialist cronies, envision for America. One where those with disabilities have to justify their existence. Thus people with Down syndrome are seen as an obstacle to be eliminated by society. 

Keywords: [“people”,”healthcare”,”syndrome”]
Source: https://www.louderwithcrowder.com/dutch-healthcare-down-syndrome

Heal Thru Words, Empowerment, Positive Self-Talk, Meditation

In the past, people worked hard to become successful and then, become happy. In the present, people work at becoming happier so that they become successful. Thanks to new technologies and understandings now at our disposal, we can let go of negative self-talk, the silent killer of our happiness, and open up to a whole new reality where a work-life balance is effectively achieved through mindfulness, positivity and wellness. Our DailyBoost™, Conscious TuneUp™ and ReWire™ Programs were created to effortlessly and quickly lead participants into becoming a more positive, balanced version of themselves. 

Keywords: [“become”,”new”,”happy”]
Source: https://healthruwords.com

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-14-2018

Competitive Enterprise Institute

It’s much more fashionable to attack Adam Smith these days than to read him. Yes, he favored economic liberalism, which wasn’t exactly in style in his time. There are two main drivers behind Smithian liberalism, neither of them cold or calculating. The foundation of Smith’s moral theory is the impartial spectator theory. Smith is well known for being an ardent free trader. 

The second driver of Smith’s brand of market capitalism is compassion for the poor. Liberalism properly understood – free markets, free trade, free migration, etc. Creates more wealth more quickly than any other economic system. In Smith’s time, the average person worldwide made around $3 per day. Today, in countries that have embraced liberalism, you can make $100 a day and consider yourself middle class. 

Rejecting liberalism means forcing the poor to miss out on the Great Fact. Smith favored liberalism because it is not only moral, it makes life better for the poor. 

Keywords: [“liberalism”,”Smith”,”trade”]
Source: https://cei.org/blog/compassion-adam-smith

Compassionate Capitalism: People Helping People Help Themselves

A plan that has made him one of America’s richest men, and that has made Amway one of the great corporate success stories of our time. Compassionate Capitalism spells out clearly and eloquently the guiding principles and concrete steps to making your life and your world better. Rich DeVos shows how your energy, your ambition, and your spirit of enterprise can travel together down a path in which the spirit of capitalism and moral values inextricably merge. Interweaving his own amazing story with vivid personal histories of men and women around the world, Rich DeVos illustrates both how success is achieved and what it truly means. He demonstrates that compassionate capitalism is the only solution to the most crucial issues of our time, and to the many other challenges that face us in the closing decade of this century and in the beginning of the next. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”DeVos”,”Rich”]
Source: https://books.google.com/books/about/Compassionate_Capitalism.html?id=dvTfTnnjxOsC

Buy Compassionate Capitalism Book Online at Low Prices in India

There are lots of wealthy people out there but most aren’t truly happy. This is largely because they aren’t fulfilling a higher purpose with their businesses, they’re simply out there trying to survive in the often cutthroat business world. Contrary to a lot of advice you may have heard out there on how to successfully build a prosperous business, DeVos claims that integrating compassion for your fellow man with lucrative opportunities is the real secret to security and happiness. It’s the knowledge that what you’re doing is making a difference that makes you feel worthy of the privilege and comfort of wealth. Even before the wealth comes, having a compassionate attitude along with sound business acumen goes a long way towards increasing your chances of attaining wealth and influence. 

A great book written in a language anyone can understand. 

Keywords: [“business”,”wealth”,”out”]
Source: https://www.amazon.in/Compassionate-Capitalism-Rich-DeVos/dp/0452270510

Entrepreneurs + Investors + Funded Innovation + Generational Wealth + Compassionate Capitalism

History has shown that the Greatest Wealth is Created through Entrepreneurism. Every Innovation that improves our lives came from an Entrepreneur with an idea; a strategy to succeed; and the funding to execute. The Good News: You don’t have to start a great company when you can invest in a great company and reap the same rewards as the founders. Recent regulatory changes have made that easier than ever to happen. We help Entrepreneurs and Investors create their legacy in the innovation they bring to market and the generational wealth they create. 

The men and women who take the road less traveled and invest in exciting private companies before they go public, have the opportunity that few realize – create wealth, leave a legacy of innovation, and have personal pride in knowing they impacted their community with new jobs and opportunities. 

Keywords: [“create”,”company”,”Innovation”]
Source: https://www.karenrands.co/

National Network of Angel Investors

All of these terms are buzz words for a simple concept. Investing in a small business when they are still private and have tremendous growth potential, so that the value of that stock creates a multiple on your money when they get sold or go public. The National Network of Angel Investors is the 4th generation of an angel investor group started in 1994, the Network of Business Acquirers and Investors. It is made up of angel groups that are forming all over the United States for a singular purpose – to have a direct impact on growing their wealth while increasing the jobs in the market and funding innovation. When you are ready to start angel investing, you’ll gain exclusive access to screened and vetted entrepreneurial endeavors with tremendous potential. 

Keywords: [“Angel”,”investor”,”start”]
Source: http://nationalnetworkofangelinvestors.com/

Why Pope Francis wants us to stop worshipping capitalism

Pope Francis’ upcoming visit to the U.S. next week is generating huge interest and expectation. Part of that excitement is rooted in the different tone the pope has taken on a number of issues, from marriage to the role of women in the church. He has also issued a tough critique of capitalism and called for more action on climate change. We kick off our coverage of the pope’s trip, which will continue all next week, with a look at those issues from our economics correspondent Paul Solman. 

It’s part of our weekly series Making Sense, which airs every Thursday on the NewsHour. 

Keywords: [“issues”,”Pope”,”Part”]
Source: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/pope-francis-wants-us-stop-worshipping-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-12-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – by Sanjiv Mehta at the #India2022Exchange

Sage launches Sage Foundation to lead social philanthropy

Sage’s 2+2+2 community model sets benchmark for FTSE 100 companies. Sage today launches the Sage Foundation which sets the standard for Corporate Compassionate Capitalism around the world. Each of Sage’s 14,000 employees will be able to contribute five days per year in work time to volunteer with any non-profit organization they elect to support. The Sage Foundation will also give grants to create entrepreneurial opportunities for the young and disadvantaged within communities, as well as grants to match employee charitable donations and fundraising. The Sage Foundation has created a model of ‘2+2+2’: donating 2% of employee time each year, 2% of free cash flow* and 2 of Sage’s smart technology products for any charity, social enterprise or non-profit organization. 

This model demonstrates Sage’s commitment to philanthropic leadership in the FTSE 100. Driven by Sage’s ambition to connect its customers, colleagues and communities within an integrated model, the Sage Foundation will be open for business globally from 1st October 2015. With tens of thousands of non-profit organizations as existing Sage customers, the Sage Foundation will enhance Sage’s relationship with charity and social enterprise. Non-profit organizations will be able to apply for donated Sage One, Sage Life or X3 products, through the newly created Donation program. The Sage Foundation will benefit from Sage revenues from the non-profit sector; notionally ‘2%’ of free cash flow is equivalent to revenue gained from non-profit sector in FY2014. 

Sage has reimagined business and brings energy, experience and technology to inspire our customers to fulfil their dreams. Sage is a FTSE 100 company with 14,000 employees in 24 countries. 

Keywords: [“Sage”,”community”,”organization”]
Source: http://www.sage.com/company/news-and-events/2015/06/02/sage-launches-sage-foundation-to-lead-social-philanthropy

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. 

Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers. 

Keywords: [“work”,”Church”,”made”]
Source: https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

How Individuals and Corporations Participate 02/15 by Karen Rands

Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. 

From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives. 

Keywords: [“company”,”invest”,”Compassionate”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands/2018/02/15/compassionate-capitalism–how-individuals-and-corporations-participate

I am a “compassionate capitalist.”

The business teaches poor/middle class how to file taxes. It’s meant as a check against corporations and rich folks getting all the breaks. It’s to level the playing field to the common person. Other capitalists who’ve seen this business model are entering the market. It works! 

In year two, we get enough customers to keep the business afloat. We level the playing field against corporations! Success! Now, any labor simply must come from overseas, paying as close to nothing as I can manage. The tax code change is good sort of! 

I don’t need new customers; the new tax code means they all have to come back for re-education! So, it works! People buy just enough to pay lobbyists, pay new accountants, keep website running, expand. I’ve made the world a better place, no doubt! The playing field between common folk & corporations is more leveled than before, surely! 

Until the next year. My business is gone, so money I paid to lobbyists to keep tax code frozen has dried up. Similar services offering tax education also dry up. Corporations pay a vastly smaller percentage of taxes than common folk. 

Keywords: [“business”,”pay”,”tax”]
Source: https://medium.com/@RickPaulas/i-am-a-compassionate-capitalist-6b80e1d643c4

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-07-2018

The Rise of Compassionate Management

Don’t look now, but all of a sudden the topic of compassionate management is becoming trendy. A growing number of business conferences are focusing in on the topic of compassion at work. At TED, Karen Armstrong’s talk about reviving the Golden Rule won the TED prize in 2009 and has given rise to a Charter for Compassion signed by nearly 100,000 people. While the importance of compassion at work has long been touted by scholars like Peter Senge, Fred Kofman, Jane Dutton and others as a foundational precept of good management, managers of the traditional, critical, efficiency-at-all-costs stripe have scoffed. Findings like this may be one reason for compassion’s rise in the workplace: perhaps years of research are finally making a dent. 

Over and over, it’s been shown that compassion concretely benefits the corporate bottom line. Plenty of others have shown that practicing compassion is good for your business. Consider what happened when a call-center company called Appletree consciously set about increasing compassion among employees. The Dream On program allowed employees to express compassion to each other on an everyday basis. The evidence also shows that compassion boosts employee well-being and health – another important contributor to the bottom line. 

The good news is that it’s possible to strengthen one’s compassion muscle – and so become a better manager. Researchers from the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconson-Madison’s Waisman Center found that engaging in compassion meditation – where you practice feeling compassion for different groups of people, including yourself – seemed to increase a sense of altruism. 

Keywords: [“compassion”,”company”,”work”]
Source: https://hbr.org/2013/09/the-rise-of-compassionate-management-finally

The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism

Whereas Cameron believed electroshocks could restore natural health, Friedman favored economic shock as extreme and destructive to nations as Cameron and CIA’s methods are to human minds. After one year of hardened shock therapy, Chile’s economy contracted 15%, unemployment rocketed to 20%, and contrary to Friedman’s rosy scenario it lasted for years with no social safety net help for desperate Chileans. Margaret Thatcher thought Chilean shock therapy wasn’t possible in a democracy like the UK because voters wouldn’t buy it. Four days into his term, he charged his emergency economic team to radically restructure the economy using shock therapy with a twist. President Paz had no mandate for shock therapy, and many workers were predictably furious at his betrayal. 

The siege lasted three months during the decisive shock therapy period with more repression and Chicago School medicine later. Indebted developing countries learned shock doctrine 101 the hard way. Enter Jeffrey Sach, the shock doc, with an even harsher plan than imposed on Bolivia. It’s pure myth, angry Poles know it, but reports in the West ignore them as they do shocked victims everywhere. Shock therapy rolled in China as in Chile – through the barrel of a gun and raw state terror. 

Later, the IMF, World Bank and other international lending agencies reinforced it – Soviet-era debts must be honored and aid depended on adopting strict shock therapy rules. Yeltsin now had unchecked dictatorial power, the West had its man in Moscow, and shock therapy had an open field to inflict wreckage on Russia’s people who didn’t know what him them as it unfolded. 

Keywords: [“Shock”,”economic”,”market”]
Source: http://rense.com/general78/lendd.htm

And Compassion for All

Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.No I just smoke weed. Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.I will go. Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.Im so psyched you’ll go. Jeremy jamrozy January 2, 2018.I love all the support the love. Jeremy jamrozy January 3, 2018.Thank you to all the support financially, emotionally, and donations. 

Jeremy jamrozy January 7, 2018.God I feel so overwhelmed with joy tears in my eyes because I’m finally getting the help I need. Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.It anymore people are going to write shit bout wut nice things happend wit auntie Sarah please note im not a trump supporter or a Democrat supporter I choose no sides. Jeremy jamrozy December 31, 2017.I know that a pay if foward campaign sounds a lil cheesy but Goddamn even the bloods and crips had a truce and peace and love for each other at some point. One of the people Silverman met along her journey was Father Greg Boyle, the executive director of Homeboy Industries, a gang prevention and rehabilitation program in Los Angeles. Thirty years later Boyle, known as Father G, is still helping gang members, and Homeboy Industries has grown into a multimillion-dollar nonprofit organization in Los Angeles that provides jobs, training and support for at-risk youth, former gang members and previously incarcerated men and women. 

Me wanting a gang member to have a different life would never be the same as that gang member wanting to have one. Compassion is a sign of strength and takes work, but the freedom from suffering compassion brings is worth the effort. 

Keywords: [“Jeremy”,”gang”,”Boyle”]
Source: https://www.truthdig.com/articles/and-compassion-for-all

John Mackey’s Message of Entrepreneurial EmpowermentThe American Spectator

Whole Foods Founder & CEO John Mackey is a man on many missions. He wants to champion capitalism in the public square. Mackey discussed the ideas behind his new book Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business in a conversational interview with Tucker Carlson Monday evening at the Cato Institute. Although the book itself was hardly referenced, Mackey’s libertarian message of confident capitalism grounded in compassionate values was clear. According to Mr. 

Mackey, businesspeople exhibit great ignorance about the capitalistic system. His view is shared by Cato President John Allison and organizations such as the Bastiat Society, which was founded to educate businesspeople about the market process. Entrepreneurs’ reluctance to embrace market principles and espouse capitalism’s virtues places them in a disadvantageously defensive position in dealing with its many critics. Mackey’s vision is that businesspeople espouse the system by which they benefit society. We need to have two major conversations in the 21st century, Mackey said. 

The critics dominate the narrative, and the people who defend capitalism make a big mistake: they concede the moral high ground. People don’t support capitalism to the same extent they did because they equate capitalism with crony capitalism. Whether he will succeed is, of course, unknowable at this juncture, but as an autodidact possessed of great idealism and an entrepreneurial impulse for action, John Mackey offers a unique approach to an intractable problem: Helping the individual understand his or her precious liberty, that it may be held dear. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”Mackey”,”businesspeople”]
Source: https://spectator.org/31439_john-mackeys-message-entrepreneurial…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-01-2018


Compassionate Capitalist – When Angel Investors are “Takers”

Qlipoth: Easier to imagine the end of the world…

Cyberpunk is not really apocalyptic, and I think the better coordinate is Ballard, the Ballard of the multiple ‘end-of-the-worlds’, minus the Byronic melancholy and the rich orchestral pessimism and Weltschmerz. For it is the end of the world that is in question here; and that could be exhilarating if apocalypse were the only way of imagining that world’s disappearance. ‘ Someone once said that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than to imagine the end of capitalism. We can now revise that and witness the attempt to imagine capitalism by way of imagining the end of the world. Ballard’s imagined world is reduced to the dimensions of that island created by intertwined expressways on which individuals in their cellular commodities hurtle to their destruction or that apartment complex in which the wealthy and professional classes degenerate into anarchic tribal warfare among themselves. The transformation of H. 

Bruce Franklin’s Marxist analysis of the ideology of Ballard and his genre into Jameson’s vague quip in Hegelese regarding the disposition of some amorphous and unspecified Geist of the Zeit perfectly exemplifies the relentless, Orwellian cultural strategy which characterized the Reagan era’s political reaction in culture. Even after the ‘end of history’ there has seemed to persist some historical curiosity of a generally systemic – rather than merely anecdotal – kind: not merely to know what will happen next, but as a more general anxiety about the larger fate or destiny of our system or mode of production. It seems easier for us today to imagine the thoroughgoing deterioration of the earth and of nature than the breakdown of late capitalism; and perhaps that is due to some weakness in our imaginations. This is the sense of the revival of that ‘end of history’ Alexandre Kojève thought he could find in Hegel and Marx, and which he took to mean some ultimate achievement of democratic equality in both American capitalism and Soviet communism, only later identifying a significant variant of it in what he called Japanese ‘snobisme’, but that we can today identify as postmodernity itself. In another sense, of course, this is simply the old ‘end of ideology’ with a vengeance, and cynically plays on the waning of collective hope in a particularly conservative market climate. 

The end of history is also the final form of the temporal paradoxes we have tried to dramatize here; namely that a rhetoric of absolute change is, for the postmodern, no more satisfactory than the language of absolute identity and unchanging standardization cooked up by the great corporations, whose concept of innovation is best illustrated by the neologism and the logo and their equivalents in the real of built space, ‘lifestyle’ corporate culture and psychic programming. As Fredric Jameson perspicaciously remarked, nobody seriously considers possible alternatives to capitalism any longer, whereas popular imagination is persecuted by the visions of the forthcoming ‘breakdown of nature’, of the stoppage of all life on earth – it seems easier to imagine the ‘end of the world’ than a far more modest change in the mode of production, as if liberal capitalism is the ‘real’ that will somehow survive even under conditions of a global ecological catastrophe. 

Keywords: [“end”,”Ballard”,”world”]
Source: http://qlipoth.blogspot.com/2009/11/easier-to-imagine-end-of-world.html

Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Success

SIX KEY DIMENSIONS OF CSR. In Western Europe, Japan, and North America, an increasing number of companies are finding that it makes good business sense to fully integrate the interests and needs of customers, employees, suppliers, communities, and our planet – as well as to those of shareholders – into corporate strategies. Whereas five years ago a survey by McKinsey & Company of the reasons for success in the machinery industry showed that factors such as cross-functional teams, single sourcing, and group work differentiated the best performing companies from the weaker ones, a more recent survey concluded that what differentiates the leaders from the laggards is their relationships with their customers and their suppliers. A number of companies participated in a workshop organized by Business for Social Responsibility recently in Hong Kong on this subject of monitoring child labor practices in Asian suppliers. Another organization helping companies improve their environmental performance is the International Network for Environmental Management, a world federation of non-profit business organizations for environmental management and sustainable development. 

Social investment: At another level, companies support initiatives in the areas of education and social problems such as unemployment, exclusion, and homelessness, often in partnership with government authorities and non-governmental organizations. Corporate involvement in the Brussels-based European Business Network for Social Cohesion and in projects to alleviate social exclusion is exemplary, as is the support of hundreds of the largest companies in the United Kingdom for the notable achievements of such associations as Business in the Community, the Prince of Wales Business Leaders Forum, and Common Purpose Partnerships: At a third level, corporations contribute to communities through direct support to activities which enhance their commercial success, including cause-related marketing. Of course, one of the questions frequently raised about activities and strategies in social responsibility is whether they detract from a company’s financial performance. The most comprehensive service of research and analysis of company environmental and social responsibility is offered by The Council on Economic Priorities. MANAGING FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Many companies are making significant improvements in their environmental and social management practices. 

The company must recognize and respect the personal worth of employees and allow them to share in the success of the company. During the past ten years, a number of business networks and companies have engaged in environmental and social accounting. The notion of ‘political companies’, on the other hand, concerns the business enterprise with its surrounding eco-system, the external stakeholders: shareholders, customers, the community, interest groups, standard-setting organisations, society at large. 

Keywords: [“Company”,”Business”,”social”]
Source: http://bahai-library.com/palazzi_starcher_social_responsibility

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-30-2018

Compassionate Capitalist – When Angel Investors are “Takers”

What Kind of Capitalism Should India Have?

Though the term ‘compassionate capitalism’ has been a part of public discourse outside India for some years now, the current spotlight on it in India is largely due to N.R. Narayana Murthy, the co-founder of Infosys. His most recent reference to it was occasioned by the hike in former CEO Vishal Sikka’s salary, which made it 935 times the median pay at Infosys last fiscal; the extraordinary severance compensation paid to Rajiv Bansal, former Infosys CFO, on his exit from the company and a pay hike of 35% to COO Pravin Rao. Describing his philosophy of compassionate capitalism, Murthy said it was capitalism in mind and socialism at heart, a creed which looks at fairness and at ensuring that everyone is better off. In FY16, at least 27 directors earned at least 100 times more than an average employee, whereas under a saner capitalism the ratio between highest compensation in the firm and the median salary should ideally be 50-60. 

Compassionate capitalism as a term became a part of public discourse globally largely after the economic crisis of 2008 and Thomas Piketty’s seminal publication, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, which highlighted the growing disparity between the haves and the have nots of this world, and movements like Occupy Wall Street. Picketty confirmed that though capitalism is central to the innovation and entrepreneurial risk-taking needed for economic growth, inequality does not naturally or automatically decline under capitalism and that capitalist growth leads to greater inequality because of the higher rate of return on capital compared with the low overall growth rate of the economy, or to put it another way, income from investments rises faster than wages. Several economists like William Easterly, professor of economics at New York University and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, have argued in favour of traditional capitalism because it helps the poor; others believe that insisting on greater equality will distract businesses from their primary goal of making profits. In the UK, 10% of profits were returned to shareholders in 1970; this figure is now 70%. In India, the figure is lower but is growing rapidly, and for many corporations it is now higher than 50%. 

Since a majority of shareholders are among the richest in society, the benefit goes largely to the rich, increasing inequality. According to recent research by Forbes and the International Monetary Fund, the wealth of 101 Indian billionaires equals 13% of country’s GDP. Every dollar of profit given to the shareholders of corporations is a dollar that could have been spent paying producers or workers more, paying more tax, or investing in infrastructure or innovation. A laissez faire capitalism which embodies an ‘I am alright Jack, and the devil take the hindmost’ attitude will no longer do. Apart from communism, reform advocacy has ranged from welfare capitalism to Gandhi’s theories of decentralised production by small individual owner producers, along with trusteeship of the wealthy; corporate and individual philanthropy; mandatory corporate social responsibility contributions from companies, to variations of compassionate capitalism such as ‘inclusive capitalism’, the ‘humane capitalism’ of Muhammad Yunus and the ‘creative capitalism’ of Bill Gates. 

Compassionate capitalism must also emphasise conscious reciprocity, a concept which implies that the giver gets as much as the receiver. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”company”,”profit”]
Source: https://thewire.in/economy/capitalism-inequality-india

Compassionate Capitalism

God is good to bring us on a journey that includes friends that become like family along the way. In our quest to bring hope and help to America’s Gold Star families, there have been a few individuals that have also brought their businesses along for the ride. We met Chris Gannon because the Rebacks love fried chicken. At the time, Chris was managing a local PDQ franchise that his family owned. His family is of Outback Steakhouse, Carraba’s, Bonefish Grill, and PDQ fame. 

Chris is one of the first people I called when I had this crazy idea of intersecting civilians and Gold Star families, and he jumped in with both feet. Chris and Tim Gannon have given us food for nearly every event, opened their homes, brought other corporations on board, and been more than just a promoter of Believe With methey have swung hammers and given of their talent, their time and effort as well. They have been eager to give back to America’s Gold Star families knowing that their success is because of the sacrifices of those who serve in our military. Chris leaves it on his mantle year round as a reminder that there are families all across this nation that have given their sons and daughters for our every freedom and opportunity. His understanding of serving and giving has been shaped by intersecting with our Gold Star familiesand our capacity to give back to those who have paid for our freedoms with their loved ones has been multiplied because of families like the Gannons. 

So if you love our Gold Star families, then feel good about giving your hard earned money to restauranteurs like the Gannons. Have a bloomin’ onion and know that every time you do, you’re helping us give back to those who have given us their ALL. Consider Sharing to Support Gold Star Families. 

Keywords: [“family”,”Star”,”Gold”]
Source: https://believewithme.com/2017/04/24/compassionate-capitalism/