J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-22-2018

Why students are attracted to Socialism and give capitalism an F?

As students most get attracted to the ideals of socialism and breathe by it. Post college and getting into a job/business, we move towards capitalism and breathe by it. Though few friends say they have moved from Capitalism to Socialism seeing the ruthless corporate world. BK Marcus reflects on this phenomenon of students giving capitalism an F:. Not only are young voters more likely to support Democrats than Republicans, they are also more likely to support the most left-wing Democrats. 

Capitalism was big business: McDonald’s, IBM, the military-industrial complex. There is little doubt that capitalism is associated with all evils of the world as socialism once was. In latter, we saw the politicians amassing huge wealth in the name of socialism and in former, it is the big corporates and finance guys who have done the same. In socialism the idea was govt would redistribute which failed. In capitalism it was market forces which were supposed to do the same but have been found equally wanting. 

According to Pastin, the highest-performing students were both more likely to be self-declared socialists and more likely to meet his proposal with outrage: grading, they argued, should be a matter of merit. Let’s say the class follows capitalism which selects on merit. This is what has been happening in world of capitalism for centuries now. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”socialism”,”more”]
Source: https://mostlyeconomics.wordpress.com/2016/03/15/why-students-are…

To Be Genuinely Compassionate, Politicians Should Focus on Job Creation, not Unemployment Benefits

The current debate about extending unemployment benefits is remarkable because certain politicians want to give people money on the condition that they don’t get a job. There is a problem with joblessness, to be sure, but it’s misguided to think that extending unemployment benefits is the compassionate response. The black unemployment rate is more than twice that of whites. We explain that more unemployment benefits is a misguided approach. The unemployed need a strong job market, not endless handouts that create dependency. 

If we are serious about keeping workers out of the long-term unemployment trap, we must have a debate about which policies cause unemployment and which policies create jobs. The column cites many of the academic studies showing that unemployment benefits lead to more joblessness. It doesn’t focus specifically on unemployment benefits, but it makes a great point about labor supply incentives. Big government is responsible for today’s unemployment situation. Since President Obama was elected, we have spent $560 billion on unemployment benefits. 

The United States enjoyed strong levels of job creation during both the Reagan and Clinton years. Well, as illustrated by this chart, they both presided over periods with impressive job creation. 

Keywords: [“unemployment”,”government”,”job”]
Source: https://danieljmitchell.wordpress.com/2014/01/10/to-be-genuinely…

Canadian Conservative Forum

I don’t think there is any question that globalization is of great benefit not only for Canada, but also for the entire world. The process of globalization creates an enviable playing field for economic growth by limiting the amount of trade barriers and opening up the free market. Many have written negative articles and books about globalization. William Greider of Rolling Stone threw everything and the kitchen sink against globalization. As a self-described libertarian conservative, I can think of no better option to follow other than globalization for three reasons. 

First, globalization will provide an equal opportunity, on a level playing field, for potential success. Second, globalization will open up the lines of international trade. Third, globalization will enhance the technological market. While not perfect, the technological boom has enhanced the future prospects of globalization. A typical attack on globalization by the left is that it looks out for the individual rather than the interests of the community. 

Globalization produces winners and losers, not a socialist communal fantasy of free money and protecting a country’s economy. Globalization opens up a whole new range of trading possibilities and free market activity. 

Keywords: [“globalization”,”free”,”market”]
Source: http://www.conservativeforum.org/EssaysForm.asp?ID=6074

Compassion International

Compassion International is a nonprofit organization founded in 1952 by Reverend Everett Swanson. Swanson felt driven to help South Korean children who were left orphaned due to the war. Today this organization aims to provide over 1.2 million children in twenty-six countries with food, shelter, education and health care, and Christian training. Although Compassion International began in South Korea, the idea caught the attention of other people and it began to spread throughout the world. Compassion International is funded by charitable donations that are tax deductible in the United States. 

Last year about 520 million dollars was donated to this charity, and of that 520 million, 80 % went towards program activities for the children. There are a few characteristics of Compassion International that makes them different from other nonprofit organizations. One characteristic is their commitment to the children. Their ministry is focused on each individual child and their needs. They work holistically with every child to focus on their spiritual, economic, social and physical needs. 

Another characteristic is their commitment to Christ. Compassion International believes that Jesus Christ is the heart of their ministry. 

Keywords: [“Compassion”,”International”,”organization”]
Source: http://www.antiessays.com/free-essays/Compassion-International-183039.html

What is Marxism

Marxism is an economic and social system based upon the political and economic theories of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. According to Marx a class is defined by the relations of its members to the means of production. He proclaimed that history is the chronology of class struggles, wars, and uprisings. Under capitalism, Marx continues, the workers, in order to support their families are paid a bare minimum wage or salary. The worker is alienated because he has no control over the labor or product which he produces. 

The capitalists sell the products produced by the workers at a proportional value as related to the labor involved. Surplus value is the difference between what the worker is paid and the price for which the product is sold. An increasing immiseration of the proletariat occurs as the result of economic recessions; these recessions result because the working class is unable to buy the full product of their labors and the ruling capitalists do not consume all of the surplus value. A proletariat or socialist revolution must occur, according to Marx, where the state is a dictatorship of the proletariat. Religion, according to Marx was the response to the pain of being alive, the response to earthly suffering. 

Keywords: [“work”,”class”,”Marx”]
Source: https://www.allaboutphilosophy.org/what-is-marxism-faq.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-21-2018

Why are Tibetan Buddhists so Compassionate?

In the 21st century, compassion can often be perceived as weakness. Compassion is the ability to display genuine concern for the suffering of others. One of the greatest examples of compassion in today’s world is the nation of Tibet. The old monk replied that on one occasion, he had allowed his anger to overcome his love, kindness, and compassion for his oppressors. The answer is rooted in the Buddhist principles of compassion loving-kindness, and non-harming. 

In other words, the highest virtue is to become a bodhisattva, loving every being as a mother loves their only child, and living in harmony with the supreme jewel of compassion, bodhicitta. Last year, a Buddhist nun told me several stories about Lama Zopa Rinpoche, the master of Kopan Monastery in Nepal, who truly embodies this universal compassion and maternal love for all living beings. We don’t all have the chance to live in the Himalayan foothills as we explore the way of compassion. For those of us who work in high street shops and office blocks, sending emails to disgruntled clients and dealing with dissatisfied customers and spending hours commuting at rush hour, Rinpoche’s level of universal compassion seems like an impossible goal. No. 

The way to compassion is simply a matter of switching perspective, from self-cherishing to universal compassion. For them, a life committed to compassion makes much more sense than a life dedicated to ourselves. Just one act of genuine compassion can leads to positive results immediately-not just for others, but for ourselves. 

Keywords: [“compassion”,”suffered”,”Lama”]
Source: https://www.elephantjournal.com/2018/03/why-are-tibetan-buddhists…

Capitalism Archives

Popular media paints a bleak picture of capitalism and touts the benefits of socialist values. Many benefits available to you and the American way of life are only possible in a capitalistic economic system. I want you to take away a viewpoint that capitalism is a positive, compassionate system. Seek out, read and become informed about the fundamentals of Capitalism. Realize how the application of the principles will benefit you and then decide to engage the system to your benefit. 

An article by Sarah Kendzior in Foreign Policy magazine details many reasons that young Americans are believed to be giving up on capitalism. While that article was a gut punch, it exposes many of the maladies of the past eight years or so that have caused young Americans to begin doubting our system. They have begun to feel like our system might not be the best, despite not having personal exposure to a longstanding socialist economic system. As you read the Paladin About page, you will find that this blog is all about promoting Capitalism. One of the blessings that I have enjoyed in my life is the opportunity to travel the world and gain first-hand knowledge of political-economic systems different from my own. 

This exposure has reinforced the belief that America has The Best Economic System at its core. It is my belief that if the principles of capitalism were studied and employed by every American, many of the maladies mentioned in Kendzior’s article would have self-corrected. 

Keywords: [“system”,”capitalism”,”American”]
Source: https://paladin4prosperity.com/category/financial-wisdom/capitalism

Do you think capitalism can be compatible with the beliefs in equality and compassion?

That would be Marxism you are searching for, where each man performs only to the level of his ability; he then receives from what is taken from other men, according to his needs and according to their ability. The man of greater ability soon begins to realize that he is being cheated, and he feigns a lower level of competency, raising his level of incompetency. Now, he too is receiving more from people who perform more, and is giving less to people who perform more incompetently–or who perform not at all. Eventually, all the greater achievers shrug, feign a higher level of incompetency, and all men are thus equal–finally! It doesn’t matter to the social engineers that everyone is now using candles because the men of high competency are pretending to be equals with the men of low competency. 

It cannot hurt anyone anymore, because no one is willing to risk his capital if the rewards that are equal to his effort are judged the same as the rewards of those who do not risk rising to higher level of competency. Capitalism is not compatible with that kind of equality and compassion. Capitalism is the only economic system that rewards men for raising their level of competency. Sometimes a man reaches his level of incompetency simply because he is unwilling to gain either more education or more experience. This is perfectly in keeping with his equal rights to achieve only what he wishes to achieve. 

Keywords: [“man”,”level”,”equal”]
Source: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100404050808AAZZDJU

The Great Philosophers 9: Max Weber

Max Weber is one of the three philosophers best able to explain to us the peculiar economic system we live within called Capitalism. Born in Erfurt in Germany in 1864, Weber grew up to see his country convulsed by the dramatic changes ushered in by the Industrial Revolution. Weber senior died the next day and the son believed he might inadvertently have killed him. Weber had to give up his university job and lay more or less mute on a sofa for two years. Max Weber had the sort of life that his contemporary, Freud, was born to address. 

Weber alleged, Protestants are left with heightened feelings of anxiety as well as life-long guilty desires to prove their virtue before a severe, all-seeing but silent God. In this analysis, Weber was in direct disagreement with Karl Marx, for Marx had proposed a materialist view of Capitalism, whereas Weber now advanced an idealist one. The argument between Weber and Marx pivoted around the role of religion. Weber didn’t believe that the only way to be a successful Capitalist country was actually to convert to Protestantism. Today Weber would counsel those who wish to spread Capitalism to concentrate on our equivalent of religion: culture. 

Weber is pessimistic about all such hopes, for they are misaligned with the reality of how the modern world works. Weber encourages us to see that change is not so much impossible as complicated and slow. 

Keywords: [“Weber”,”Capitalism”,”work”]
Source: http://thephilosophersmail.com/perspective/the-great-philosophers-9-max-weber

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-07-2018

The Rise of Compassionate Management

Don’t look now, but all of a sudden the topic of compassionate management is becoming trendy. A growing number of business conferences are focusing in on the topic of compassion at work. At TED, Karen Armstrong’s talk about reviving the Golden Rule won the TED prize in 2009 and has given rise to a Charter for Compassion signed by nearly 100,000 people. While the importance of compassion at work has long been touted by scholars like Peter Senge, Fred Kofman, Jane Dutton and others as a foundational precept of good management, managers of the traditional, critical, efficiency-at-all-costs stripe have scoffed. Findings like this may be one reason for compassion’s rise in the workplace: perhaps years of research are finally making a dent. 

Over and over, it’s been shown that compassion concretely benefits the corporate bottom line. Plenty of others have shown that practicing compassion is good for your business. Consider what happened when a call-center company called Appletree consciously set about increasing compassion among employees. The Dream On program allowed employees to express compassion to each other on an everyday basis. The evidence also shows that compassion boosts employee well-being and health – another important contributor to the bottom line. 

The good news is that it’s possible to strengthen one’s compassion muscle – and so become a better manager. Researchers from the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconson-Madison’s Waisman Center found that engaging in compassion meditation – where you practice feeling compassion for different groups of people, including yourself – seemed to increase a sense of altruism. 

Keywords: [“compassion”,”company”,”work”]
Source: https://hbr.org/2013/09/the-rise-of-compassionate-management-finally

The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism

Whereas Cameron believed electroshocks could restore natural health, Friedman favored economic shock as extreme and destructive to nations as Cameron and CIA’s methods are to human minds. After one year of hardened shock therapy, Chile’s economy contracted 15%, unemployment rocketed to 20%, and contrary to Friedman’s rosy scenario it lasted for years with no social safety net help for desperate Chileans. Margaret Thatcher thought Chilean shock therapy wasn’t possible in a democracy like the UK because voters wouldn’t buy it. Four days into his term, he charged his emergency economic team to radically restructure the economy using shock therapy with a twist. President Paz had no mandate for shock therapy, and many workers were predictably furious at his betrayal. 

The siege lasted three months during the decisive shock therapy period with more repression and Chicago School medicine later. Indebted developing countries learned shock doctrine 101 the hard way. Enter Jeffrey Sach, the shock doc, with an even harsher plan than imposed on Bolivia. It’s pure myth, angry Poles know it, but reports in the West ignore them as they do shocked victims everywhere. Shock therapy rolled in China as in Chile – through the barrel of a gun and raw state terror. 

Later, the IMF, World Bank and other international lending agencies reinforced it – Soviet-era debts must be honored and aid depended on adopting strict shock therapy rules. Yeltsin now had unchecked dictatorial power, the West had its man in Moscow, and shock therapy had an open field to inflict wreckage on Russia’s people who didn’t know what him them as it unfolded. 

Keywords: [“Shock”,”economic”,”market”]
Source: http://rense.com/general78/lendd.htm

And Compassion for All

Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.No I just smoke weed. Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.I will go. Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.Im so psyched you’ll go. Jeremy jamrozy January 2, 2018.I love all the support the love. Jeremy jamrozy January 3, 2018.Thank you to all the support financially, emotionally, and donations. 

Jeremy jamrozy January 7, 2018.God I feel so overwhelmed with joy tears in my eyes because I’m finally getting the help I need. Jeremy jamrozy December 29, 2017.It anymore people are going to write shit bout wut nice things happend wit auntie Sarah please note im not a trump supporter or a Democrat supporter I choose no sides. Jeremy jamrozy December 31, 2017.I know that a pay if foward campaign sounds a lil cheesy but Goddamn even the bloods and crips had a truce and peace and love for each other at some point. One of the people Silverman met along her journey was Father Greg Boyle, the executive director of Homeboy Industries, a gang prevention and rehabilitation program in Los Angeles. Thirty years later Boyle, known as Father G, is still helping gang members, and Homeboy Industries has grown into a multimillion-dollar nonprofit organization in Los Angeles that provides jobs, training and support for at-risk youth, former gang members and previously incarcerated men and women. 

Me wanting a gang member to have a different life would never be the same as that gang member wanting to have one. Compassion is a sign of strength and takes work, but the freedom from suffering compassion brings is worth the effort. 

Keywords: [“Jeremy”,”gang”,”Boyle”]
Source: https://www.truthdig.com/articles/and-compassion-for-all

John Mackey’s Message of Entrepreneurial EmpowermentThe American Spectator

Whole Foods Founder & CEO John Mackey is a man on many missions. He wants to champion capitalism in the public square. Mackey discussed the ideas behind his new book Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business in a conversational interview with Tucker Carlson Monday evening at the Cato Institute. Although the book itself was hardly referenced, Mackey’s libertarian message of confident capitalism grounded in compassionate values was clear. According to Mr. 

Mackey, businesspeople exhibit great ignorance about the capitalistic system. His view is shared by Cato President John Allison and organizations such as the Bastiat Society, which was founded to educate businesspeople about the market process. Entrepreneurs’ reluctance to embrace market principles and espouse capitalism’s virtues places them in a disadvantageously defensive position in dealing with its many critics. Mackey’s vision is that businesspeople espouse the system by which they benefit society. We need to have two major conversations in the 21st century, Mackey said. 

The critics dominate the narrative, and the people who defend capitalism make a big mistake: they concede the moral high ground. People don’t support capitalism to the same extent they did because they equate capitalism with crony capitalism. Whether he will succeed is, of course, unknowable at this juncture, but as an autodidact possessed of great idealism and an entrepreneurial impulse for action, John Mackey offers a unique approach to an intractable problem: Helping the individual understand his or her precious liberty, that it may be held dear. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”Mackey”,”businesspeople”]
Source: https://spectator.org/31439_john-mackeys-message-entrepreneurial…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-14-2018

Why It’s Good Business For Levi’s To Care About What You Do With Your Jeans at Home

Your next pair of Levi’s might come with a clothesline or shoebox-sized dryer. After a recent lifecycle assessment, Levi’s realized that 60% of the climate impact of a pair of jeans comes after the jeans are made and sold; nearly 80% of this is from drying the jeans in a dryer. Instead, it launched Care to Air, an awareness campaign and contest to shift consumer behavior in favor of the environment. In partnershihp with Myoo Create, Levi’s will award $10,000 for the world’s most innovative, covetable, and sustainable air-drying solution for clothing. You don’t have to buy jeans, or even own Levi’s products, for the campaign to be a success. Since Levi’s has chosen the environment-at-large as a beneficiary, it doesn’t get to leverage the credibility or press that a nonprofit partner would bring to bear. Part of a company’s responsibility is to educate and involve its consumers in making more responsible choices and to pressure their competitors to raise their responsibility game. This is exactly what Levi’s is doing with Care to Air, and it’s brilliant because as much as you register the brand behind this campaign, it isn’t about the brand at all. It’s about what I do with my clothes at home and how I understand this to affect the environment.

Keywords: [“Levi's”,”jeans”,”consumer”]
Source: http://causecapitalism.com/why-its-good-business-for-levis-to-care-about…

Pay attention, Progressives: Conservative Millennial Allie Stuckey SCHOOLS Americans on why Capitalism is superior to Socialism – twitchy.com

Allie Stuckey, better known as the Conservative Millennial, explained why Capitalism and the free market are far superior to Socialism. It’s the very reason why people want to make a life here. 1 reason full-on socialism fails is because it negates humans’ inherent desire for ownership. Shared means of production=no private property= no ownership. Socialists ignore that people possess an inherent drive for their own piece of the pie- to have something that’s truly theirs & to do something that actually matters, contributes & provides. Capitalism, though imperfect, is the only economic system that recognizes & rewards this. Free enterprise has lifted more people out of poverty, mediocrity & misery than socialism ever has or will- because, unlike socialism, it taps into the tenacity of the human spirit rather than subdues it. We enjoy the best technology, entertainment and quality of life in the world because of capitalism. People do not become kinder when they’re forced to share. While capitalism isn’t perfect, it is the only system that encourages freedom, innovation & generosity. Socialism seeks to render those things useless through absolute government control. I can’t believe that in 2018 people still have to explain why socialism doesn’t work.

Keywords: [“Socialism”,”people”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://twitchy.com/bethb-313034/2018/03/11/pay-attention…

Compassionate Capitalism

I live amongst a population that is educated, involved and hard-working and as we get older and earn more, the trend is to buy a bigger house, a nicer car, and more luxury brand clothing. I don’t have time or money left to have compassion on others because I’ve spent so much of it on myself and my family. I’m talking about compassion that compels action and affects change. Compassion that compels us to downgrade so someone else can upgrade above the poverty line. Compassion needs the resources that our capitalist society produces. When I do buy, I buy from companies that value the dignity of the people working for them. I’m just making sure compassion guides my contribution to it. I mean, I just got done saying we should have less and spend less and you probably received a marketing email from us this week asking you to buy our not-so-cheap clothes. I’m more interested in you becoming a conscious consumer than a repeat consumer. Third, for us at Vickery Trading Co., capitalism is our compassion. We use something that people are already buying and turn it into opportunity for the marginalized. Our Associates earn fair wages for their hard work while learning job and life skills so they can go pursue the American Dream.

Keywords: [“compassion”,”buy”,”more”]
Source: https://vickerytrading.org/compassionate-capitalism

No hope without compassion: the importance of compassion in recovery-focused mental health services: Journal of Mental Health: Vol 20, No 6

Whilst current policy is replete with recovery language and references to the need for services to create a sense of hope and optimism, there is less understanding about how such hope may be engendered within services. We propose that an understanding of compassion is necessary to appreciate what actually stimulates hope-inspiring practices. An examination of the continuing relevance of compassion to mental health care and an exploration of its place within modern mental health policy and practice. A review of the compassion deficit in mental health care and a critical examination of whether the direction of current mental health policy in the UK is likely to facilitate compassionate care. Compassion needs to be viewed not merely as an individual expression or property but something which must be nurtured in context, through relationships, cultures and healing environments. Current mental health policy and practice does not appear to prioritise the development of such contexts. The development of compassionate contexts should have a stronger place in modern mental health practice and policy.

Keywords: [“mental”,”health”,”compassion”]
Source: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638237.2011.583949

Bookstore – Conscious Capitalism

The flood of information, unprecedented transparency, increasing interconnectedness and our global interdependence – are dramatically reshaping today’s world, the world of business, and our lives. We are in the Era of Behavior and the rules of the game have fundamentally changed. It is no longer what you do that matters most and sets you apart from others, but how you do what you do. Whats are commodities, easily duplicated or reverse-engineered. Sustainable advantage and enduring success for organizations and the people who work for them now lie in the realm of how, the new frontier of conduct. Seidman’s distinct vision of the world, business, and human endeavor has helped enable more than 15 million people doing business in more than 120 countries to outbehave the competition. Now updated and expanded, HOW includes a new Fore¬word from President Bill Clinton and a new Preface from Dov Seidman on why how we behave, lead, govern, operate, consume, engender trust in our relationships, and relate to others matters more than ever and in ways it never has before.

Keywords: [“how”,”business”,”world”]
Source: https://www.consciouscapitalism.org/bookstore

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-11-2018

Board and Global Compassion Council

On February 28, 2008 acclaimed scholar and bestselling author Karen Armstrong received the TED Prize and made a wish-to help create, launch, and propagate a Charter for Compassion. Our organization, Charter for Compassion, was inspired and created by Karen Armstrong and the Council of Conscience in 2009, and inherits a confluence of contributions made by TED.com, the Compassionate Action Network, the Fetzer Institute, and many others. Through a vibrant Charter for Compassion Partner Network we welcome and communicate the sharing of information, stories and experiences that touch the work of compassion. The Charter for Compassion is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, EIN# 46-3554077. The Global Compassion Council is the advisory body for the Charter for Compassion. Karen Armstrong, 2008 TED Prize winner, creator of the Charter for Compassion, renowned author on religion, history, compassion. Amin Hashwani, Pakistani businessman and founder of the Compassionate Schools Network and Charter for Compassion Pakistan. Monica Neomagus, co-founder of the Dutch Charter for Compassion Foundation, trainer, organizer, social worker. Tori McClure, president of Spalding University in Louisville, the first university to sign the Charter for Compassion; first woman to row a boat, alone, and without assistance, across the Atlantic. Zeid Abdul-Hadi, Co-Founder, Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of an investment and development company in Amman – Jordan; founder of Charter for Compassion Jordan.

Keywords: [“Compassion”,”Charter”,”lead”]
Source: https://charterforcompassion.org/about1/global-compassion-council

on the need to grieve the loss of a shiny, optimistic future to climate change. to take care of ourselves and each other. to accept loss. and to build compassionate, resilient communities, with the ingenuity to face dark times ahead.

I’ve been thinking about this for a few months, and have had a few chats with people about it, but i’m still working things through. It seems almost blasphemous amongst activist circles, and probably mainstream, to talk about grief re climate change. I think we need to let ourselves grieve, support each other in doing that, and recognise that we do have a major loss – the loss of the future we thought we had. that is important to do because we are all human, all precious and special and deserving of care. We need to be functional for the months and years and decades ahead. not still attached to our non-existant shiney future, like someone never moving on from a relationship breakup or bereavement. We need to accept that loss, and carry it with us as we take care of ourselves, our communities, all humanity, all life on this planet. Somehow the other side of grief is a life you can start reconstructing – always changed by that profound loss, but not always defined and constrained by it. They grieved, and they held that loss, and are able to keep living. I do think we have to, probably all of us alive today, go through grief for the loss of a healthy planet, a bright future. I think refusing to allow ourselves to is negatively affecting our mental health and our ability to make progressive change. I think we need to be there for each other, to hold each other whilst we cry, to listen to each other’s pain and fear in a massage circle of emotional support.

Keywords: [“think”,”loss”,”need”]
Source: https://fleabite.wordpress.com/2017/12/11/on-the-need-to-grieve…

Compassionate Capitalism

Citizens of the world are less and less supportive of capitalism solely based on maximizing short-term profits. Unilever is one such company, realizing and owning their need to contribute to the societal welfare and environmental impact for the countries it operates in. They want to propose a new model of capitalism that focuses on the long term, in which companies try to solve social and environmental problems and give equal importance to the needs of communities, as well as their shareholders. Unilever has over 400 brands worldwide under its umbrella, ranging from foods to household cleaners, including Lipton, Knorr, Dove, and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream; sold in almost every country, with two billion people using a Unilever product every day. Unilever developed the brand Lifebuoy with a marketing strategy based on campaigns to educate mothers and children to adopt this simple gesture. It has a triple advantage – the consumer is healthier, the company sees a decline in health care costs for its employees, and Unilever benefits from increased sales of soap. Unilever’s greatest impact is within the agricultural sector. Worldwide, the company purchases 12% of the world’s black tea, 3% of the tomatoes, and 3% of the palm oil. Unilever is connected with more than one million small farmers alone. Oxfam estimates the number of small-businesses that Unilever touches is more than half a billion, and improving their lives and businesses is an effective way to reduce poverty.

Keywords: [“Unilever”,”company”,”less”]
Source: https://borgenproject.org/tag/compassionate-capitalism

Book Review: The Economics of Neighborly Love: Investing in Your Community’s Compassion and Capacity, by Tom Nelson

I expected there to be some overlap of between Tom Nelson’s The Economics of Neighborly Love: Investing in Your Community’s Compassion and Capacity and the arguments and jargon used by the Institute for Faith, Works, and Economics. What I did not expect was to read a book full of claims, anecdotes, and quotes with very little support for the thesis. Nelson wrote this book to encourage people to use free-market capitalism to love their neighbors with Jesus; it is written in a manner that requires the reader to already understand what he’s talking about and to already agree with it. Rather than use evidence and hard data to support claims made in the book, Nelson uses quotes from others to say the same thing, but does not quote the data and reason for what other authors have written. I certainly do not mean to imply that there is nothing good in this book-there is; but I would not recommend anyone spend money on this. Instead of writing the book, a blog post of overarching claims and a short bibliography would have been more helpful so that people may actually discover for themselves what it is Nelson desires them to understand. To that end, I would simply suggest perusing the IFWE website and reading the oft quoted When Helping Hurts: How to Alleviate Poverty without Hurting the Poorand Yourself by Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert, which will certainly serve any reader well. I received a temporary digital copy for review from InterVarsity Press via NetGalley.

Keywords: [“read”,”book”,”Nelson”]
Source: https://durough.wordpress.com/2017/10/14/book-review-the-economics…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-06-2018

Jeb Bush’s Brilliant Defense of Capitalism

When Jeb Bush talks about the statists, I never thought I’d see the day. I never thought I would see the day – and Jeb Bush is with the Republican establishment. Everybody is the same, everybody is equal, except the people at the top and we’re gonna cream ’em, we’re gonna nail ’em and we’re gonna cut ’em down to size, and in the process of cutting everybody at the top down to size, look at what you’re gonna end up with. The only people who should suffer consequences are the rich, and we’ll define that as $150,000 a year or more. That’s what the statists say, people such as Obama. That’s what we conservatives believe, because we conservatives believe that no two people or things are equal; it’s not possible. Of course, that’s not what Jeb Bush or anybody else who professes all this actually means. BREAK TRANSCRIPT. RUSH: I have to tell you, Jeb Bush sounds like me. Jeb Bush in his own words is taking half the message that I take out when I go to do a Rush to Excellence appearance. Steve Moore doesn’t go on Fox and throw out the possibility of Jeb Bush throwing his hat in the ring and point out that nobody’s getting over 30% in our primary, but a lot of people are thinking the same thing somewhere.

Keywords: [“people”,”Jeb”,”Bush”]
Source: https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2011/12/19/jeb_bush_s_brilliant…

Capitalism Vs Communism Vs Socialism Vs Compassionate Capitalism

Capitalism and Communism are not a political system. What communism in its purest form does is it tries to suppress this induvidualistic brilliance and tries to turn it into a mass mediocrity where every one has the same level of output and reward. Having said this I will not attribute the fall of communism to this flaw alone. It was due to the tyrannical rulers and dictators who modified communism to their whims and fancies. You can take all communist leaders all the leaders are guilty of suppressing any independent thought and murdering their own people, a perfect recipie for a riegn of terror. In the entire History of India we never had an Iota of communism as we were seeped in feudal mindset and caste system. If you take the dravidian movement which opposed this system it still supported the individual brilliance but it only opposed the subjugation of one set of people by another. We need to have separate systems for Social System and Economic System. Capitalism is not a panacea for all ills,infact it is not even a well defined boundary of thinking. Politically India was a democracy and people were free to express their views except in Emergency.

Keywords: [“system”,”Communism”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://aliensofnec.wordpress.com/2007/12/10/capitalism-vs…

Facebook Injects Buddhism Into Business

Facebook is experimenting with ways to make the site a little more compassionate. It’s no secret that Facebook can serve as a platform for bullying. Cyber bullying occurs on Facebook more than any other site, according to a study last year by Internet security company McAfee. It turns out that 92% of the teenagers surveyed have witnessed bullying on Facebook. In Facebook’s earlier days, the tools for reporting malicious behavior were subpar. So back in 2010, Facebook Engineering Director Arturo Bejar decided to do something about it, Noah Shachtman of Wired reports. After attending a talk about kindness at the Wisdom 2.0 conference, Bejar felt inspired to implement compassion into the core of Facebook’s business. They suggested Facebook make its reporting tools more personal, conversational, and emotional. The changes were small at first, but they ultimately increased usage by 30%. Later changes included more personalized messages and even culture-specific pleas. The basis of Buddhist compassion is that we’re all interconnected, and as Shactman notes, there’s no other place where that is more obvious than on Facebook.

Keywords: [“Facebook”,”more”,”compassion”]
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-injects-buddhism-into-business-2013-6

Political Scientist, Anti-War Activist, Philosopher, Sociologist, Literary Critic, Journalist, Educator, Scholar, Economist

Max Weber was a 19th-century German sociologist and one of the founders of modern sociology. Born in Germany in 1864, Max Weber was a precocious child. Still, their house was full of prominent intellectuals and lively discourse, an environment in which Weber thrived. After graduating from high school, Weber studied law, history, philosophy and economics for three semesters at Heidelberg University before spending a year in the military. Weber married a distant cousin, Marianne Schnitger, in 1893. After his father died in 1897, Weber suffered a mental breakdown. When Weber was finally able to resume working in 1903, he became an editor at a prominent social science journal. After a stint volunteering in the medical service during World War I, Weber published three more books on religion in a sociological context. These works, The Religion of China, The Religion of India and Ancient Judaism, contrasted their respective religions and cultures with that of the Western world by weighing the importance of economic and religious factors, among others, on historical outcomes. Weber’s writing helped form the basis of modern sociology.

Keywords: [“Weber”,”religion”,”publish”]
Source: https://www.biography.com/people/max-weber-9526066

Profits with a Purpose

To reintroduce myself and the purpose of this blog- my name is Katie and I’m a senior journalism student at UNC-CH. This semester, I’m studying Conscious Capitalism and how it’s been changing free-enterprise capitalism as a whole. I’ve begun reading the Whole Foods co-founder John Mackey and Raj Sisodia’s book Conscious Capitalism. These are businesses with conscious leaders who care about their people and the company’s purpose. Conscious businesses understand that stakeholders really matter. The store was eight feet underwater-all the equipment and inventory in the store were destroyed. Mackey recalls the unexpected happening-dozens of customers and neighbors came to the store to help clean and fix the store. The support from other stakeholders was remarkable- even suppliers offered to resupply Whole Foods on credit. Because of this support, Whole Foods was able to successfully reopen. Whole Foods is not alone as a conscious business that creates multiple kinds of value and well-being for all stakeholders. Next time, I’ll discuss what Conscious Capitalism is not.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”Capitalism”,”stakeholders”]
Source: https://profitswithapurpose.wordpress.com/tag/whole-foods

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-01-2018

The Instant Pot and How Empathy is at the Core of Capitalism

The Instant Pot is a little story of how entrepreneurs unselfishly better our world. If you don’t have an Instant Pot or don’t cook, you are probably wondering what the fuss is about. Without traditional advertising, Instant Pot has become a best-selling item on Amazon, selling 215,000 units on Amazon Prime Day. Reimagined for the 21st Century, the Instant Pot combines slow cooker and pressure cooker features and adds others. We have two Instant Pots on our kitchen counter; most days, we use both. We assumed these frustrations were the price we paid for home cooking until the Instant Pot arrived. Dr. Robert Wang, the inventor of the Instant Pot, was certain there was a better way that only he could see. Yes, Dr. Wang created wealth for himself; but he did so by improving the lives of others, including a small economy of cookbook authors showing how to use the Instant Pot for every possible cuisine. Successful entrepreneurs have empathy for the consumer; crony capitalists focus on their own needs. Entrepreneurs, not crony capitalists with their political enablers, bring you well-stocked supermarkets with fresh food from all over the planet and a better pot for cooking.

Keywords: [“Pot”,”Instant”,”Wang”]
Source: https://stream.org/instant-pot-empathy-core-capitalism

| Book Review: Compassionate Capitalism

Salesforce.com donates their CRM database to nonprofits. Benioff founded Salesforce.com and from day one was thinking about corporate philanthropy. Benioff left Oracle and started Salesforce.com in the mid 1990’s. In the last year they’ve doubled the number of nonprofits who have been donated Salesforce.com CRM to a total of 1000. As a Salesforce.com implementer for nonprofits, I’m a bit conflicted at the popularity of the Salesforce.com donation program. If Oracle/Google/Microsoft bought Salesforce.com would the donation program go away? Microsoft has an extensive community affairs department, and I’ve been on the receiving end of many of their grants, so if they purchased Salesforce.com, I couldn’t see them killing the program right away. The Salesforce.com experience with philanthropy, at least from the outside, seems to be a mirror of their experience in business. The biggest of which, I think, was that nonprofits who were getting Salesforce.com donation weren’t being successful in getting it up and running. As you’ve no doubt figured out, I’m a big fan of Salesforce.com.

Keywords: [“Salesforce.com”,”nonprofit”,”donation”]
Source: http://gokubi.com/archives/book-review-compassionate-capitalism

compassionate capitalism – JR Test Site

People disagree on the details, he says, but across the political spectrum most agree we should balance the innovative power of capitalism with a basic compassion for people. Capitalism and compassion: a test of Milbrath’s environmental theory. From his observations of environmentalists Milbrath extracts the generalization that there is something inimical between capitalism and compassion. It is concluded that there are many roads to compassion, capitalism not excepted. Conscious Capitalism NEO. Conscious Capitalism builds on the foundations of Capitalism – voluntary exchange, entrepreneurship, competition, freedom to trade and the rule of law. These are essential to a healthy functioning economy, as are other elements of Conscious Capitalism including trust, compassion, collaboration and value creation. Killed more compassion than capitalism could ever.communism, and capitalism were among the options. The connection between capitalism and war is a.Capitalism would be considered sacred and of value. What broke the family? What purchased it: capitalism. Conscious Capitalism is a term coined by John Mackey.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”compassion”,”Law”]
Source: http://jr.zaphne.com/category/compassionate-capitalism

Quakers, ethics and capitalism

Quaker control of Cadbury’s had ended long before the Kraft takeover. The Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre – housed in George Cadbury’s former home on the edge of Bournville – had not sold Cadbury’s chocolate for years, confining itself to Fairtrade varieties. Many British Quakers still felt an emotional attachment to Cadbury’s. Deborah Cadbury, a non-Quaker relative of the famous chocolate-makers, has argued that “Quaker capitalism” was far more ethical than the shareholder capitalism of today. Quaker business success is often attributed to the “Work ethic”. Young Quakers would often be sent to Quaker employers to learn a trade. Deborah Cadbury’s new book Chocolate Wars presents Quaker capitalism as a widespread movement with enlightened values in the world of business. The paternalistic attitudes of the more generous Victorian Quakers seem rather mild compared to the early Quaker values of the 1650s. It is small wonder that some look back with enthusiasm to Quaker capitalism. In 2009, a series of events exploring zero-growth economics was organised by Quaker Peace & Social Witness and the Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre.

Keywords: [“Quaker”,”Cadbury”,”Work”]
Source: http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/14583

Compassionate Capitalism, the Workplace, and Social Capital

While compassionate capitalism may seem like a contradictory statement, examples of this practice suggest the power of this model. In this chapter, we review key components of capitalism and compassion. We explore governmental intervention through the Great Depression, the New Deal programs initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Milton S. Hershey’s groundbreaking business philosophy that was beneficial to the company and to his employees. We then look at the present-day examples of business models that do not sacrifice the community and environment for profit, provide examples of companies that are implementing these models, discuss the business case for doing this, discuss new regulatory support for the concept of compassionate capitalism, and explore how companies are rated by their employees and the community on their “Giving back” practices. KeywordsCompassionate capitalism Corporate social responsibility Corporate citizenship Job satisfaction Best or great places to work Benefit corporations Strategic corporate philanthropy Employee engagement.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”Corporate”,”Employee”]
Source: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-33264-2_7

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-25-2018

Embodied Spirituality: Compassion

Spirituality – embodied or otherwise – is merely narcissism and self-indulgence when it doesn’t involve compassion – literally, feeling with others. We cannot really expect others to be convinced that we are “Mystical” or “Spiritual” unless we put compassion into practice by helping others. The two aspects of religion go hand-in-hand: without a sense of connection there is no basis for compassion, and without the expression of compassion in the form of caring, the life of a mystic can be barren and unproductive. In a Pagan context, we might view the theological underpinnings of compassion as our view that divinity is immanent in the world, and everything carries a spark of divinity within it. My theological basis for compassion is a religious basis, but it is also a naturalistic basis. Beyond the practical aspects of compassion lies the recognition of kinship, of looking into the face of another and seeing ourselves. The ancient virtues of hospitality and reciprocity are core values for many Pagans, and these are, in many ways, related to compassion. Compassion is not only fellow-feeling for other humans, but also for animals and birds: all our relations. The Charter for Compassion would benefit from a “Green clause” to emphasise caring for the Earth and our fellow creatures. Although there is a section on their website about treating the Earth with compassion, it hits a discordant note for me, as we need to recognise that we are part of the Earth, not regard it as a separate system from ourselves.

Keywords: [“compassion”,”being”,”love”]
Source: https://dowsingfordivinity.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/embodied…

Free eBooks download

Download. Download A Course in Ordinary Differential Equations, Second Edition ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The Sultan’s Admiral: Barbarossa: Pirate and Empire Builder ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Human Evolution: An Illustrated Introduction ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download McGraw-Hill Education TASC: The Official Guide to the Test ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Hood Ornaments ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Peace: Four-volume set ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Memories of Shanghai: Thirty Years of Shanghai in the Eye of a Folk Photographer ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download 100 cosas que deberias saber sobre los caballeros y castillos / 100 Facts on Knights and Castles ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download 12 Concertos, Op.3: Full Score [A5707] ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Fart Free Vegan: Food Combining for Detox, Weight Loss and More Energy ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below.

Keywords: [“Download”,”pdf”,”ebooks”]
Source: http://www.moto-lock.com/compassionate/compassionate-capitalism-people…

Capitalism and Self-Care

As a person who struggles with anxiety, one of the ways I’ve shamed myself is when I believe I haven’t been productive enough. Dad would epilogue his stories with, “I pulled myself up by my bootstraps so I could give my children the life I didn’t have.” The message is clear: work hard and I can achieve anything. Has anyone noticed that being productive never includes self-care? As a person who struggles with anxiety, as a person who has several loved ones who have mental health struggles, and as a person who works in the mental health field- I see so many people be hard on themselves for not producing enough, especially if their reason for not doing so involves mental health issues. Because we are told we aren’t good enough to justify taking time away from productivity to practice self-care. “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” ~Audre Lorde. If we collectively practice self-care by taking time away from being productive, what would the world look like? What would happen? “I’m a failure for not doing the thing.” -> transforms to -> “Taking care of myself does not make me a failure.” I ask myself whether I’m practicing self-care because I need to or because I shamed myself to. Asking myself what I would say to a friend/loved one going through a similar situationthen turning those words back to myself. Telling myself it’s okay not to be productive because I am important.

Keywords: [“myself”,”work”,”self-care”]
Source: https://expressivesocialworker.wordpress.com/2016/04/29/capitalism…

No, Capitalism Is Not Ruining Your Christmas Market

Glowing Christmas lights fill the cold streets of medieval European cities with little wooden booths selling steaming hot wine and cinnamon biscuits. First off: Christmas markets are, at least in Europe, a billion euro industry. In a more detailed analysis on Christmas markets in the UK, researchers found that in the example of the city of Manchester, an average stall at a Christmas market generated £3,500 per day. Christmas markets in Brussels, Belgium, and Strasbourg, France count between 1.5 and 2 million visitors. Your local Christmas market is a money-making machine regardless of it selling candles or car insurance. The Christmas spirit is supposed to advocate for empathy and compassion, as the biblical stories describe Jesus, a poor man, who preached charity despite receiving very little of it in return. They fail to be the ones who are actually celebrated around Christmas for providing these essential opportunities to people. When there is a large company selling their products on a traditional Christmas market, many see a greedy company ruining the flair of the Christmas spirit. All it takes to see this is to think of the millions of people oppressed by socialism, like those in Venezuela, who will, this year, spend among the worst Christmas Eves they have ever witnessed. Next time you see a large coffee machine retailer or a booth advertising cleaning products at your local Christmas market, think of the people whose lives were made better through these companies.

Keywords: [“Christmas”,”market”,”people”]
Source: http://thelead.com/no-capitalism-not-ruining-christmas-market

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-23-2018

Compassion and the Real Meaning of the Golden Rule – Brain Pickings

The principle of compassion lies at the heart of all religious, ethical and spiritual traditions, calling us always to treat all others as we wish to be treated ourselves. Compassion impels us to work tirelessly to alleviate the suffering of our fellow creatures, to dethrone ourselves from the centre of our world and put another there, and to honor the inviolable sanctity of every single human being, treating everybody, without exception, with absolute justice, equity and respect. We urgently need to make compassion a clear, luminous and dynamic force in our polarized world. Rooted in a principled determination to transcend selfishness, compassion can break down political, dogmatic, ideological and religious boundaries. Born of our deep interdependence, compassion is essential to human relationships and to a fulfilled humanity. Compassion can’t be enacted without first grasping its essence in a way that reclaims it from the realm of abstraction and makes it an actionable quality. Compassion is aptly summed up in the Golden Rule, which asks us to look into our own hearts, discover what gives us pain, and then refuse, under any circumstance whatsoever, to inflict that pain on anybody else. Compassion can be defined as an attitude of principled, consistent altruism. The immense public veneration of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, and the Dalai Lama shows that people are hungry for a more compassionate and principled form of leadership But in many ways compassion is alien to our modern way of life. Armstrong laments – and I wistfully agree – that compassion has slipped woefully low in our hierarchy of cultural priorities.

Keywords: [“compassion”,”treat”,”human”]
Source: https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/01/08/karen-armstrong-compassion

‘Compassionate’ Conservatism Was a Mistake

Today there is a categorical difference between what Republicans stand for and the principles of individual freedom. Too often the policy agenda was determined by short-sighted political considerations and an abiding fear that the public simply would not understand limited government and expanded individual freedoms. The modern Republican Party has risen above its insecurities to achieve political success. Small government conservatism was, by definition, compassionate – offering every American a way up to self-determination and economic prosperity. Republicans lost control of Congress in 2006 because voters no longer saw Republicans as the party of limited government. Their failure to do so must not be misconstrued as a rejection of principles of individual liberty by the American people. The evidence suggests we are still a nation of pocketbook conservatives most happy when government has enough respect to leave us alone and to mind its own business. Of course, FDR’s election ushered in the New Deal, the most dramatic expansion of government power in American history, together with policy changes and economic uncertainty that inhibited investment and growth and locked in massive unemployment for nearly a generation. In 1992, Republican backbenchers including Newt Gingrich, myself, Bob Walker and John Boehner rose up to challenge the Clinton administration’s agenda on taxes, spending and government-run health care. We captured control of Congress in 1994 because we had confidence in our principles, and in the American people’s willingness to understand and reward a national vision based on lower taxes, less government and more freedom.

Keywords: [“government”,”Republican”,”American”]
Source: https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB122602742263407769

Better World Quotes

“Democracy” is one of the most important principles for a better world. Economic freedom – not democracy, and not ecological stewardship – is the defining metaphor of the WTO and its central goal is humanity’s mastery of the natural world through its total commodification. Democracy needs support and the best support for democracy comes from other democracies. The real world of American society is one which it is very misleading to call simply a democracy. “If our modern world should be able to recapture this power, the earth’s natural resources and web of life would not be irrevocably wasted within the Twentieth century.True democracy founded in neighborhoods and reaching over the world become the realized heaven on earth. And living peace, not just an interlude between wars, would be born and would last through the ages.” – John Collier. The modern infrastructures that exists in the world all contribute to the advancement of human rights and democracy. As a people, we need to rise to the level of forcing our leaders to abide by our stated principles – really exercise democracy, not only on our behalf but on behalf of the world. “Peace cannot exist without justice, justice cannot exist without fairness, fairness cannot exist without development, development cannot exist without democracy, democracy cannot exist without respect for the identity and worth of cultures and peoples. Democracy is a device that ensures we shall be governed no better than we deserve. Most of the poverty and misery in the world is due to bad government, lack of democracy, weak states, internal strife, and so on.

Keywords: [“Democracy”,”people”,”Democratic”]
Source: http://www.betterworld.net/quotes/democracy-quotes.htm

Henderson Hallway

Canada is a perplexing concept; our country can often be conceptualized in shimmering positivity, and then, upon closer inspection can be dragged through the dusty and bloody streets of reality. MacLennan’s Two Solitudes is an obvious example of cultural paradoxes within the “Narrative” of Canada, as is the the story of the Winnipeg General Strike. In recent weeks, I have also been struck by an increasingly larger divide in Canada that is often left unarticulated – that is our image as a massive expanse of natural beauty contrasted with our 400 year history of resource exploitation. What follows in the film is a shocking barrage of the treatment of the first peoples of Canada and the land itself. The fellow in the coffee shop who works for Suncor, is part of a system of resource exploitation that destroys these vast and wild lands. As Canada delves further into oil sands development, pipeline construction, and dependence on fossil fuels, so too continues the dichotomy of Canada. No, Canada’s sick duality can only be synthesized into a sustainable vision through social and political action. Canada’s reputation in the global community has soured as of late; we no longer lead in peacekeeping, we rank first in deforestation, and our record on treating our indigenous peoples speaks for itself. I would reckon that we have an opportunity to build a better Canada – one that is sustainable, innovative, compassionate, and inclusive. First we need to take the collective action necessary to shed the dichotomies of the past and create one singular and positive vision based on respect for the land and each other.

Keywords: [“Canada”,”first”,”land”]
Source: https://hendersonhallway.wordpress.com/category/capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-20-2018

Walking the Talk – 100+ Ways To Make A Difference

Over the years I have been deeply involved in fund raising, community development and what I call compassionate capitalism. Over the years I have witnessed a darker side of capitalism. As long as it doesn’t effect the bottom line it is blind to the environmental or community consequences due to their business. The time has come to call for action, to call for “Compassionate capitalism.” Already on the horizon are ground breaking books like, The Divine Right of Capital that promotes the dethroning of corporate aristocracy for what Marjorie Kelly calls Economic Democracy; or Bill Jensen’s book, Work 2.0, which calls for new labor contracts and the realignment of corporate assets. Perhaps we are better off calling for “Compassionate capitalists.” Patricia Panchak, Editor-n-Chief, of Industry Week pointed out in her March 2002 editorial, Capitalism At A Crossroad?, that according to a 2000 Business Week/Harris poll, when people were give a choice between the two phrases that they supported more strongly: “Corporations should have only one purpose – to make the most profit for their shareholders – and pursuit of that goal will be best for America in the long run.” -or- “Corporations should have more than one purpose. They also owe something to their workers and the communities in which they operate, and they should sometimes sacrifice some profit for the sake of making things better for their workers and communities.” – 95% percent of those surveyed choose the latter statement. Today there are great disparities among communities. The communities are broken down; they are without hope and have great need. In the Old Testament when Jerusalem was in ruins, Nehemiah heard the call of God to do something about it.

Keywords: [“community”,”call”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://walkingthetalk.wordpress.com/2007/03/10/can-capitialism-be…

Why Compassion Is Hard – The Next Step

Compassion underlies all world religions, most boldly embodied in the provocation “Love your enemies as you do yourself.” Yet in a world of violence and hatred, where people sleep in the streets of our wealthiest cities, it seems compassion is in short supply. At a time of year when we tend to dream of world peace, and to that end, guilt ourselves and others into being nicer, it’s rare that we spend time truly understanding compassion. Is compassion an innate behavior, or one that you learn?Why is it hard to show strangers compassion?How can we be more compassionate in our daily lives? Robert Wright, a journalist and philosopher and author of several books on the biology of compassion, sees compassion as a natural process of evolution. “It happened through a principle known as kin selection. And the basic idea of kin selection is that, if an animal feels compassion for a close relative, and this compassion leads the animal to help the relative,then, in the end, the compassion actually winds up helping the genes. underlying the compassion itself.” Expanding compassion is the life’s work of Karen Armstrong, religious thinker and author of “12 Steps to a More Compassion Life”. Kristen Armstrong compiled a life’s work in compassion into a simple, 12-step book aimed at promoting compassion around the globe. Our failure to show compassion to others with whom we disagree causes political logjams, abuse of power, and otherwise childish behaviors that often cause in harm to each other and our environment. Finding compassion in times of disagreement may be more challenging, but the rewards are far greater. As compassion grows among us, and the barriers between human communities are torn down, the result will be more peace.

Keywords: [“Compassion”,”more”,”world”]
Source: https://thenextstep0.wordpress.com/2015/12/14/why-compassion-is-hard

War = Capitalism, Capitalism = War by William Bowles – Dandelion Salad

Crisis is capitalism’s middle name and, as in the past, crisis leads to war, major wars and indeed lotsa ‘little’ ones too. I don’t think you need a crystal ball to figure out that capitalism is headed down the major war path, it’s displaying all the same pathological signs as it has done in past decades; economic crisis, economic collapse, repression abroad and repression at home. War, better still, general war solves all of these problems, for the capitalist class that is. Pax Americana! Rule Britannia! It’s the ultimate end-product of industrialising war, just as capitalism has industrialised everything else and trashed the planet in the process. So what is stopping us from stopping them? Is it because we’re as suicidal and as shortsighted as the ruling class is? Like all honest socialists, I’m an optimist, I like to think that we are different from our rulers, that people are being misled, lied to, hooked on addiction to things by the all-devouring monster that is capitalism. Of course it’s extremely dangerous to draw direct analogies with the past but the common thread is capitalism, so you have to draw the obvious conclusion don’t you? Well don’t you? How can you escape the obvious when a man called Donald Trump heads up the most powerful, the most destructive society in all of history. The choice is yours and in a really bizarre, nay abhorrent way, perhaps we do have to thank Donald Trump, for he has surely and finally revealed to us the true nature of capitalism in all its horrific barbarism. For Trump is no aberration, he is capitalism personified, just as Hitler’s Germany was brute force capitalism. A shot across the bows of capitalism but no more than that. First we need a viable programme upon which to base our alternative to capitalism.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”war”,”left”]
Source: https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/2018/01/22/war-capitalism…