J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 09-26-2018

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Compassionate Capitalism and Local Community Publications

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc. Maria Peck, previously the director of the ACE Women’s Center, will lead one of ACE’s biggest projects slated to begin this year. Peck’s focus will be on providing access to commercial loans of $50,000 and greater and being visible in the Hispanic community by giving presentations and collaborating with other organizations. Peck started working at ACE as a microlender after working with ACCION USA, owning her own business, and gaining more than 15 years of sales and marketing experience in Atlanta and New York. About Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc.ACE is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and CDFI loan fund that provides loans and business consulting services to help borrowers throughout Metro Atlanta and North Georgia create and grow stable, sustainable businesses that generate jobs. 

Founded in 1999, ACE has loaned more than $39 million to about 725 entrepreneurs, which has created or saved more than 6,200 jobs in Georgia. You don’t have to be a successful entrepreneur to create generational wealth if you can learn how to invest in those companies that have the potential to be the next big thing, according to Karen. Karen has been described by some as a dominant force in the entrepreneur and investor markets with her blog, published articles, frequent speaking engagements, and her Compassionate Capitalist radio show. She has been a frequent speaker and mentor within numerous Small Business and Economic Development initiatives and was the recipient of the Advocate of the Year award in 2016 at the Flight to Freedom Summit in San Ramon, California, for her work to promote Compassionate Capitalism. Karen left the corporate world over a decade ago, having been involved with many product launches, to pursue her passion for seeing innovation funded and to help the entrepreneur and investor community she served create thriving businesses. 

Karen immersed herself in the world of angel investing, first as the protégé to the founder of the Network of Business Angels. The power of microtargeting to a businesses exact demographic by supporting their local community publication. The power of content branding and the opportunity to be the only business in their industry to be allowed to submit content for the duration of their sponsorship. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”entrepreneur”,”ACE”]
Source: https://probusinesschannelusa.com/buckhead-business-show-access-to-capital-for-entrepreneurs-compassionate-capitalism-and-local-community-publications/

Kony 2012: clueless compassionate capitalism

Equally, the Invisible Children organisation, credited with the YouTube video entitled ‘Kony 2012’ cannot be taken lightly. Invisible Children claim the money raised would be used for positive construction work and projects in Northern Uganda, where Kony’s rebels operate, despite having raised US$8.6 million and used only 32 percent of that money for services in Northern Uganda in 2011. As their record has shown, money is the central nerve in the Kony 2012 project, a project that brings to bear some of the murky operations among charity organisations that wail for the downtrodden as they wipe their crocodile tears with the millions of dollars ostensibly raised to help Africans. As glossy and superficial as it is, with respect to the real problems in Uganda, the Kony 2012 film has caught the attention of millions. After having sent heavy contingents to root out al-Shabab, accepting an American military presence in Uganda to deal with the Kony affair does not augur well for Museveni, especially as a lot of Ugandans view the al-Shabab threat as a clear and present danger following the World Cup bombings in 2010 in Kampala, the capital. 

In the meantime, a coterie of Hollywood stars have joined the fray and are calling on all and sundry to make Kony 2012 famous in order to make Kony, the man, more infamous. Whilst such an oversimplification of the Kony dilemma and, for that matter, the Ugandan canker has helped the Invisible Children group to pander to sentiments and raise a lot of money, rooting out the Kony quagmire remains a Ugandan political affair. ICC’s decision to indict Kony and not the Ugandan army smacks of a lack of objectivity or fairness. In neighbouring, recently, independent South Sudan, where Kony and his men also hover, petrol and land have ignited massive international interest. So while the Invisible Children group’s call, for American intervention and all out support to the Museveni regime- by demonising a rather weakened Kony and LRA, may come as a diversionary relief for the everlasting government, it is far from being the biggest concern for Ugandans. 

The regional political dynamics cannot be separated from any international decision to root out Kony. Big salaries for them and little help to the millions of Kony’s victims in need of justice and respite. 

Keywords: [“Kony”,”Uganda”,”Ugandan”]
Source: http://www.theafricareport.com/Columns/kony-2012-clueless-compassionate-capitalism.html

Compassionate capitalism – The Denver Post

Political theorist Benjamin R. Barber should have considered hiring CNN’s Lou Dobbs as his publicist. Barber shares Dobbs’ zealousness for a return to a more gentle and compassionate capitalism, one that remains committed to mainstream values such as work and investment saving and learning to defer our own gratification for future generations. Advertisers spent less than $100 million trying to attract youths in 1990, and by 2000 had increased their advertising budget for teenagers to more than $2 billion. American kids alone spend more than $169 million a year and marketers see vast opportunities in India and China where a larger percentage of the population is under 20. 

Barber points out that educational and government institutions, which once served as a balancing forces to rampant consumerism, have simply joined the fray, leasing their classrooms and cafeterias and football stadiums to the highest bidders without regard for quality or integrity of product. Barber is not just some modern-day Benjamin Franklin lecturing us on impulse control. This accomplished author is worried that the annihilation of the town square for the suburban mall, coupled with the invasion of technologies like cellphones and video games, have replaced civilized public discourse and the responsibilities that accompany good citizenship. We remain infantilized and powerless over the more important decisions in our lives. He is an advocate for change by boycott, government pressure and encouraging corporations to embrace more wholesome business practices that look beyond profit. 

He remains insistent on staying on his message, and often seems to miss big chunks of the larger picture that may seem obvious to many readers. In more than 300 pages, he never once considers the dramatic effect of the women’s movement and the role it may have played in spurring reckless consumerism. Elaine Margolin is a freelance book reviewer and essayist in Hewlett, N.Y.. 

Keywords: [“Barber”,”more”,”market”]
Source: https://www.denverpost.com/2007/03/15/compassionate-capitalism/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 08-30-2018

Steward-Ownership is Capitalism 2.0

Professor Steen Thomsen, the chairman of the Center for Corporate Governance at Copenhagen Business School, has studied companies with comparable ownership structures extensively. In many national legislations, it is stated that unless changed in the bylaws of the company, shareholder profit should be the north star guiding the decisions of its management. For steward-owned companies, profits are a means to an end, not an end in themselves. If the company’s management sees a way to increase its profits that is in conflict with the purpose of the company, it is no longer bound to choose profits over purpose. Based on a thorough analysis of the market situation of online marketplace technology, Sharetribe’s management might come to the conclusion that if the company focuses its efforts solely on building steeply priced proprietary marketplace technology that helps big organizations create marketplaces where retailers can sell their products to consumers more efficiently, it could increase its profits significantly. 

Second, the company would be contributing to the increased consumption of new goods instead of decreasing it, which would be in conflict with the goal of more efficient utilization of resources. Principle 2: Ownership equals entrepreneurship The second principle of steward-ownership states that the company should be in control of people who hold active roles in it. Reliable returns to investors: Redeemable shares Like a traditionally structured company, a steward-owned company might also encounter a situation where its business would benefit from an outside investment. VC firms typically expect their returns to come via a company sale or an IPO. They make high-risk investments and typically expect that one out of every ten companies they invest in will be able to generate enough returns to justify all the other nine investments. 

The only reason VC funds have such high return expectations per company is the high failure rate of VC-funded companies. If the management of a steward-owned company comes to the conclusion that the company’s net impact is no longer positive due to its negative externalities, the management is incentivized to change the company’s ways. Steward-ownership is a great example of how, with a few simple changes in how companies are structured and governed, we can get the benefits of capitalism without its downsides. 

Keywords: [“company”,”share”,”Purpose”]
Source: https://www.resilience.org/…/steward-ownership-is-capitalism-2-0

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Compassionate Capitalism and Local Community Publications

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc. Maria Peck, previously the director of the ACE Women’s Center, will lead one of ACE’s biggest projects slated to begin this year. Peck’s focus will be on providing access to commercial loans of $50,000 and greater and being visible in the Hispanic community by giving presentations and collaborating with other organizations. Peck started working at ACE as a microlender after working with ACCION USA, owning her own business, and gaining more than 15 years of sales and marketing experience in Atlanta and New York. About Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc.ACE is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and CDFI loan fund that provides loans and business consulting services to help borrowers throughout Metro Atlanta and North Georgia create and grow stable, sustainable businesses that generate jobs. 

Founded in 1999, ACE has loaned more than $39 million to about 725 entrepreneurs, which has created or saved more than 6,200 jobs in Georgia. You don’t have to be a successful entrepreneur to create generational wealth if you can learn how to invest in those companies that have the potential to be the next big thing, according to Karen. Karen has been described by some as a dominant force in the entrepreneur and investor markets with her blog, published articles, frequent speaking engagements, and her Compassionate Capitalist radio show. She has been a frequent speaker and mentor within numerous Small Business and Economic Development initiatives and was the recipient of the Advocate of the Year award in 2016 at the Flight to Freedom Summit in San Ramon, California, for her work to promote Compassionate Capitalism. Karen left the corporate world over a decade ago, having been involved with many product launches, to pursue her passion for seeing innovation funded and to help the entrepreneur and investor community she served create thriving businesses. 

Karen immersed herself in the world of angel investing, first as the protégé to the founder of the Network of Business Angels. The power of microtargeting to a businesses exact demographic by supporting their local community publication. The power of content branding and the opportunity to be the only business in their industry to be allowed to submit content for the duration of their sponsorship. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”entrepreneur”,”ACE”]
Source: https://probusinesschannelusa.com/buckhead-business-show-access-to…

Churchill’s Compassionate Conservatism

A Burkean conservative who always sought a balance between tradition and change, Churchill understood the necessity of using state power to solve social problems. Churchill presents an alternative portrait of conservatism. In the spirit of his Tory predecessor, Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, Churchill wanted to revive the alliance between nobles and workers so as to curb the power and dominance of the bourgeoisie. Heeding the dictates of his conscience, Churchill crossed the aisle to join the Liberal Party in 1904, whereupon he worked with David Lloyd George and others to enact policies that would provide economic security and improve conditions for the working class. Churchill later worked alongside his peers in the Liberal Party, including Lloyd George, to pass the National Insurance Act of 1911. 

In particular, Churchill was responsible for spearheading the provision on unemployment insurance, but he also enthusiastically embraced the act’s section that created National Health Insurance for British workers. Ardent in his belief that the National Insurance Act bolstered Britain’s market economy and militated against the dreaded socialist alternative, Churchill continued to support modest expansions of the welfare state during the interwar period. A Liberal economist who had worked for Churchill during the creation of the National Insurance Act, Beveridge called for a dramatic expansion of national insurance that would offer every British citizen comprehensive protection from the vagaries of life, including poverty, unemployment, and illness. A year later Churchill expressed more explicitly his support for universal health insurance. As his wartime speeches and memos demonstrate, Churchill favored a more active state that would provide cradle-to-grave social insurance and equality of opportunity. 

Without having to work directly with other party leaders, as he had done under the coalition government, Churchill could have slashed or even repealed many of the programs for which Labour had worked so hard, including its crown jewel, the National Health Service. In the end, Winston Churchill can be remembered for bolstering the National Health Service and, more generally, helping create and expand the modern welfare state in the United Kingdom. 

Keywords: [“Churchill”,”Insurance”,”National”]
Source: https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/churchills…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-28-2018

Turning Point USA: This pro-capitalism campus group beats back efforts to shut it down

Two recent victories scored by the nationwide campus activism group Turning Point USA show the relatively young but growing organization is fighting back against efforts to shut its clubs down – and winning. This week, a club the pro-capitalism group sought to form at a California campus was approved by administration after student government leaders voted to reject it. Last week, a Michigan university settled a lawsuit with Turning Point USA. As a result, its members may now travel the campus promoting free speech instead of in just a small corner of campus. Often, students seeking to form Turning Point USA chapters face an uphill battle. 

In the span of two years, for example, student government leaders at five different universities have refused to give the free market club official recognition as a student organization. Since 2015, student leaders at Santa Clara University, Northwestern University, Creighton University, Drake University and Hagerstown Community College denied Turning Point student chapters such recognition, which would generally give the group permission to reserve space for free on campus and receive a portion of student fee allocations for events. At Creighton, the ROTC student seeking to form the club at that Catholic university in Nebraska, Justin Carrizales, was rejected twice before finally securing approval in January. Turning Point USA is a relatively new nonprofit campus activism group that largely strives to promote fiscal responsibility, free markets and free speech issues and stays away from social issues. While the group has seen success and growth in recent years, the nearly half-dozen rejections at some campuses to form – even though overturned – is not the norm, according to Matt Lamb, director of Campus Integrity for TPUSA and a former student reporter for The College Fix. 

After the nonprofit legal organization Alliance Defending Freedom filed suit against the school on behalf of the club, administrators walked back their stance and revised their expressive activity policies to respect students’ First Amendment freedoms. The Hagerstown Community College administration settled a lawsuit after the student wishing to start the club sued. After being rejected 15-3 by the student senate this past fall, the club must wait until fall 2017 to renew its plea for recognition. 

Keywords: [“student”,”university”,”club”]
Source: https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/31578

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Compassionate Capitalism and Local Community Publications

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc. Maria Peck, previously the director of the ACE Women’s Center, will lead one of ACE’s biggest projects slated to begin this year. Peck’s focus will be on providing access to commercial loans of $50,000 and greater and being visible in the Hispanic community by giving presentations and collaborating with other organizations. Peck started working at ACE as a microlender after working with ACCION USA, owning her own business, and gaining more than 15 years of sales and marketing experience in Atlanta and New York. About Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc.ACE is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and CDFI loan fund that provides loans and business consulting services to help borrowers throughout Metro Atlanta and North Georgia create and grow stable, sustainable businesses that generate jobs. 

Founded in 1999, ACE has loaned more than $39 million to about 725 entrepreneurs, which has created or saved more than 6,200 jobs in Georgia. You don’t have to be a successful entrepreneur to create generational wealth if you can learn how to invest in those companies that have the potential to be the next big thing, according to Karen. Karen has been described by some as a dominant force in the entrepreneur and investor markets with her blog, published articles, frequent speaking engagements, and her Compassionate Capitalist radio show. She has been a frequent speaker and mentor within numerous Small Business and Economic Development initiatives and was the recipient of the Advocate of the Year award in 2016 at the Flight to Freedom Summit in San Ramon, California, for her work to promote Compassionate Capitalism. Karen left the corporate world over a decade ago, having been involved with many product launches, to pursue her passion for seeing innovation funded and to help the entrepreneur and investor community she served create thriving businesses. 

Karen immersed herself in the world of angel investing, first as the protégé to the founder of the Network of Business Angels. The power of microtargeting to a businesses exact demographic by supporting their local community publication. The power of content branding and the opportunity to be the only business in their industry to be allowed to submit content for the duration of their sponsorship. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”entrepreneur”,”ACE”]
Source: http://probusinesschannelusa.com/buckhead-business-show-access-to-capital…

50 years since the Panthers formed, Capitalism + Drugs still = Genocide

This article analyzes 1) addiction from a thoroughgoing, critical perspective, and 2) compares some widely accepted healing approaches with those of the Black Panther Party and the Rainbow Coalition-multinational, revolutionary-minded community groups that the Panthers inspired. Today, the concept that drug addiction is a medical issue that should be addressed with appropriate, coordinated public health measures is gaining ground though still not universally accepted. Capitalism does not work to comprehensively solve the problem of addiction among workers, as addiction itself, as well as its criminalization, serve to divert and tamp down the class struggle. From its inception in 1966, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense led local and national struggles to challenge the oppression that weighed on the Black community and on all disenfranchised people. In reality, the drug epidemic is far worse today than it was 50 years ago when the Panthers confronted it as a major assault on oppressed communities. 

The Young Lords provided leadership and direction to those Puerto Ricans, Black people and poor whites looking to confront the underlying source of their pain and addiction. Defying convention, the Young Lords challenged the institutions in their community that turned their backs on the people. Inspired and trained by the Panthers – the architects of survival programs – other oppressed people, poor whites and radicalized young people organized themselves into the American Indian Movement, the Patriot’s Party and White Lightening, as well as many multi-national socialist formations across the country. New Recovery focuses on community education and political advocacy around issues of importance to the recovery community-for instance, insurance parity for mental health and addiction treatment, restoration of voting rights for felons convicted of drug crimes, alternatives to prison as an approach to the problem of addiction, and so on. People who work a strong program of recovery have the potential to become powerful organizers because they are principled people. 

The uplifting of communities necessarily touched masses of people. Only a new system, which prioritizes people’s needs over profits, can we make health care available to all poor and working people. 

Keywords: [“people”,”community”,”Addiction”]
Source: http://liberationschool.org/50-years-since-the-panthers-formed-capitalism…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Classical liberalism is compassionate, ethical capitalism – Sanjeev Sabhlok’s revolutionary blog

Essentially this distinguishes utility into two types: utility that adds real value to mankind and utility that adds to one’s pride. Competition becomes cut-throat competition. Competition degenerates into competition for false pride. I particularly refer to the idea of nationalism/master race/religious pride, etc. Scientific knowledge will become a tool for control over other humans. I’m thinking here mainly about the evil of Social Darwinism and eugenics. For someone to be killed just because he or she was a little bit disabled, or sterilised just because he or she was a little bit less able than the rest of us, is repugnant to the classical liberal. Founded as he is on a firm belief in the equality and improvability of EACH individual, and optimism for the future of mankind, the classical liberal is perhaps the most compassionate human being around. He also insists on a social minimum for those who are entirely incapable of sustaining themselves without support. According to him, if you can’t survive the competition of the economy and the competition of biological evolution, then you are a dead end and must be discarded. This view is consistent with the best idea in ALL religions. In that sense the classical liberal is extremely religious.

Keywords: [“Competition”,”Social”,”pride”]
Source: https://www.sabhlokcity.com/2013/08/classical-liberalism-is…

Core Focus: Examples of Compassionate Capitalism

We at Core Focus are proud to support good causes, and note that many firms today are getting involved in food drives, 5Ks, and other events that raise either funds or awareness. Some are taking this idea of doing the right thing a step further though, forging trade deals with social good in mind. Coalition of Immokalee Workers: Founders Lucas Benitez and Greg Asbed have created a union between workers in Florida’s tomato industry and some of the biggest names in food, including McDonald’s and Walmart. The giants agreed to limit their business deals to farmers who respect their workers, and to pay an extra penny per pound for tomatoes. They double the wages of tomato pickers in the Sunshine State. I2 Institute for Imagination and Ingenuity: When she was visiting Harvard, Hayat Sindi proposed a nonprofit that would create moderately priced tools designed for business owners in emerging countries. The result was i2, which connects founders from Middle Eastern countries with investors and mentors from Harvard and the Boston area. Here at Core Focus, we’ve always thought business could be a force for good – not just profit. We applaud their efforts and wish them success as they change the way business is done around the world.

Keywords: [“business”,”good”,”Workers”]
Source: http://corefocusincorporated.com/core-focus-examples-compassionate-capitalism

‘Compassionate capitalism’ for the developing world

“Compassionate capitalism will be the way of the future” and is the only way that for-profit companies will be able to sustain themselves in developing markets, according to Asher Hasan, Founder and CEO of Naya Jeevan, a nonprofit social enterprise dedicated to providing health insurance to disadvantaged families. Hasan told an audience here at the Asia Society that Naya Jeevan’s mission is to “Alleviate poverty by providing affordable access to quality catastrophic health care” when catastrophic events render families either financially insolvent or heavily indebted. >/>Working with private sector and multinational corporations in Pakistan and with academic and non-profit institutions, Naya Jeevan provides health insurance coverage for domestic employees of people working for large multinationals, low-income participants in the supply chains and distribution networks of these companies, and to low-income employees of corporations. >/>This model is also being followed in other South Asian contexts, notably in Bangladesh and India. Citing the example of the Seva Foundation in India, Hasan noted that private providers often face criticism for supposedly usurping the state’s role as a provider of health services.

Keywords: [“provides”,”health”,”Jeevan”]
Source: https://asiancorrespondent.com/2010/06/compassionate-capitalism…

Why Capitalism Works

Only capitalism creates a group of people, known as entrepreneurs, who have no choice but to concern themselves with the needs and desires of others. Few economists actually study the behavior of these entrepreneurs, the creative leaders of capitalist businesses. Entrepreneurs must begin by saving, which is defined as forgoing consumption to achieve long-term goals. Entrepreneurs must collaborate with others, building teams to achieve their aims. What entrepreneurs do when they seek profit is far more than self-interest. Under capitalism, a business prospers only if customers voluntarily trade for its output. If the entrepreneur pursues his own interests first and his customers’ interests second, his business will fail. Sooner or later an altruistic entrepreneur will surpass him. Capitalism at its essence is a competition of giving. The genius of capitalism, and only capitalism, is that it channels self-interest into altruism. Entrepreneurs can only help themselves by helping others. Those courageous souls, the entrepreneurs who are the beating heart of capitalism, who bring us the endless material benefits we enjoy from ATM machines to life saving medicines – should be held up for admiration, not torn down.

Keywords: [“entrepreneur”,”others”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://www.prageru.com/videos/why-capitalism-works

Compassionate Capitalism by Rich Devos, Richard M. Devos, Devos,Richard M./Devos,Rich

9780452270510Compassionate capitalism? How could that be? Doesn’t “Capitalism” mean “Dog-eat-dog, law of the jung … more »le, every person for himself”? Rich DeVos, co-founder and former president of Amway, responds to this hard-nosed approach with a resounding “No.” He offers more than a vision in this extraordinary book. A plan that has made him one of America’s richest men, and that has made Amway one of the great corporate success stories of our time. Compassionate Capitalism spells out clearly and eloquently the guiding principles and concrete steps to making your life and your world better. Rich DeVos shows how your energy, your ambition, and your spirit of enterprise can travel together down a path in which the spirit of capitalism and moral values inextricably merge. Interweaving his own amazing story with vivid personal histories of men and women around the world, Rich DeVos illustrates both how success is achieved and what it truly means. He demonstrates that compassionate capitalism is the only solution to the most crucial issues of our time, and to the many other challenges that face us in the closing decade of this century and in the beginning of the next.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”DeVos”,”Rich”]
Source: https://www.gettextbooks.com/isbn/9780452270510

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Compassionate Capitalism

One must admire the extent of compassion expressed by the captains of capitalism. Some people unfairly snickered when George Bush declared himself a compassionate conservative, but he is a passionate advocate of business and his description may have been accurate. Despite all the talk about greed being the fuel that drives capitalism, profits are virtually irrelevant. As further evidence, I read today that the Bank of America is reluctant to lower the value of its own loans out of compassion for the people who stayed up-to-date with their payments. One of the motives for subprime loans was to meet the desires for people who wanted enjoy homeownership. Business opposes minimum wages out of compassion for workers who might lose their jobs. For the same reason, business reluctantly accepts tax breaks only because it allows them to help unfortunate workers who might find themselves without a boss. The same motives explain why business fights so heroically against regulation. Finding themselves without a social safety net, people receive an education, allowing them to navigate the complexities of the marketplace, assuming that they survive the experience. Should such people meet their maker, their demise will represent a charitable gift to the poor-oppressed taxpayers, who already shoulder excessive burdens. Taxpayers are the most admired agents in capitalism. If corporate leaders were more egotistical, they would be paying more taxes.

Keywords: [“people”,”business”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://michaelperelman.wordpress.com/…/10/compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism Is Possible Through Effective Corporate Philanthropy

Charitable giving is no longer just something you do around the holidays. With Millennials valuing socially focused companies more than ever, success is virtually unattainable if you aren’t giving back. In 2014, corporate giving was only at $18.45 billion compared to the $265 billion from individual donations. Why aren’t companies getting on board with this new trend? According to Suzanne DiBianca, the Chief Philanthropy Officer at Salesforce and keynote speaker at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week, it’s because, simply put, companies need money. DiBianca pioneered a philanthropic model that will hopefully usher in a new era of corporate giving. “The real assets in a company are the people that work there, the products that they have, and their ability to advocate for change in policy,” said DiBianca in her keynote speech at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week. Dubbed the 1-1-1 model, companies are encouraged to donate one percent of their product, equity, or employee time to causes that align with their values. As DiBianca puts it, charitable giving is about more than reaching your target audience. Giving back is something that benefits the entire community, helping to build an ecosystem that can support everyone from any background. The most important takeaway from DiBianca’s speech was that the future of business is philanthropic. Get on board with the giving back movement or your business will be left behind.

Keywords: [“company”,”DiBianca”,”giving”]
Source: https://tech.co/compassionate-capitalism-philanthropy-2017-03

Compassionate capitalism made me a Conservative

I started a business with my husband and lived through the challenges and failures that every entrepreneur faces. I witnessed the sacrifices that other business founders, leaders and entrepreneurs make to get their startups off the ground. In this way, I saw compassionate capitalism in action. When you’re in the business of pie creation, what you really care about is a government that understands how to help create more pie. Conservatism has always been about creating more pie. Conservative values and policies are the only ones that set people free to follow the dream of starting their own business. Why is it that the word entrepreneur is something we are OK with, but capitalist isn’t? And why is that some on the left can say “Capitalism doesn’t work” – and increasing numbers of people believe it? In my two and a half decades in business before I entered Parliament, much of it spent as an HR Director, I witnessed only a handful of rogue. The vast majority care about their people like they’re family. We must do much more to ensure that everyone has access to the capital and the opportunities that have enabled me, and entrepreneurs like me, to start businesses. For Conservatism to stay relevant, it must hold fast to its support for the brave person who risks their security for a dream: the entrepreneur, the compassionate capitalist. Capitalism does work, its compassionate and we must support it, fearlessly.

Keywords: [“business”,”entrepreneur”,”people”]
Source: https://capx.co/compassionate-capitalism-made-me-a-conservative

New Oklahoma City business organization explores pillars of ‘Conscious Capitalism’

Oklahoma City businesswoman Valerie Riley, founder of the personal assistant firm Lifesquire, has applied to start an Oklahoma chapter of the nonprofit group Conscious Capitalism. Conscious Capitalism is a business philosophy that focuses on compassion and collaboration in the workplace. The nonprofit Conscious Capitalism Inc.’s backers include the founders of many retail giants including Whole Foods, The Container Store and Trader Joe’s. The organization is based on four central pillars: higher purpose, stakeholder orientation, conscious leadership and conscious culture. Conscious Capitalism has 17 chapters in the United States and seven international chapters. Riley said the goals of Conscious Capitalism align with the team-first vision employed at her company. “For us, running a business has to be about more than just making money,” Riley said. “It’s about developing a sense of emotional and cultural wealth as well, within our team and our community.” Riley has invited numerous local businesses to take part in an introductory meeting to discuss an Oklahoma chapter of Conscious Capitalism. She hopes the group will encourage the local business community to integrate some of Conscious Capitalism’s ideas into their businesses. The group’s first meeting is set for 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Oak & Ore, 1732 NW 16, in Oklahoma City’s Plaza District.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”Capitalism”,”Oklahoma”]
Source: http://newsok.com/article/5459788

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Compassionate Capitalism: Full Text Of Narayana Murthys Letter To The Media

Mumbai: Text of Narayan Murthy’s letter to the media about COO Pravin Rao’s compensation. I recruited Pravin in 1985 and had nurtured him throughout my stay at Infosys since then. Those of us who have always stood for fairness in compensation and practised it, right from the day Infosys was founded, will have to demonstrate it when needed. I believe in striving towards reducing differences in compensation and equity in a corporation. You may not know that my Infosys salary at the time of the founding of Infosys was just 10% of my salary in my previous job. I gave them huge equity compensation the like of which has never been replicated in this world. I have always felt that every senior management person of an Indian corporation has to show self restraint in his or her compensation and perquisites. Without compassionate capitalism, this country cannot create jobs and solve the problem of poverty. Further, giving nearly 60% to 70% increase in compensation for a top level person when the compensation for most of the employees in the company was increased by just 6% to 8% is, in my opinion, not proper. This is grossly unfair to the majority of the Infosys employees including project managers, delivery managers, analysts, programmers, sales people in the field, entry level engineers, clerks and office boys who are toiling hard to make the company better. No previous resolution in the history of the company has received such a low approval. Finally, given the current poor governance standards at Infosys, let us also remember that these targets for variable pay may not be adhered to if the board wants to favor a top management person.

Keywords: [“compensation”,”Infosys”,”salary”]
Source: http://profit.ndtv.com/news/corporates/article-compassionate-capitalism-full-text-of-narayana-murthys-letter-to-the-media-1676524

Is the future role of social enterprise to foster compassionate capitalism?

Our expert panel discuss the role of social enterprise in society, and the values of social business. In our recent Q&A, experts debated the role of social enterprise in society. For social enterprises today I think it is important they pursue both ideals vigorously: delivering social good and generating a profit. Hannah Catmur: Entrepreneurs create jobs, develop new products or services, but social entrepreneurs add a new dimension: they aim to solve social problems. Social enterprise brings competing and conflicting interests together to create a shared value where everybody can win. I would say that the role of social enterprise is to provide goods and services that address social issues in a sustainable way – which means profitable enough to stay in business and grow. What role should social enterprises play in the public sector? Joshua Bridgens: Social enterprise is a good model for the NHS. In common with many people I’m uncomfortable with the concept of large multinationals managing healthcare for profit. Social enterprise seems a better solution, but only with the assurance that business rigour will remain as good. Social businesses thrive on market failure – it’s part of our job to match the budding social enterprises with the markets where there is abundance for them and our movement. Would Mr Gates have done more good for the world by running a social enterprise, or is it better that he has made billions through an entirely ‘for profit’ model and now has a huge amount of money to put into social projects? For more news, opinions and ideas about the social enterprise sector, join our community.

Keywords: [“social”,”enterprise”,”business”]
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/social-enterprise-network/2014/apr/24/what-is-the-role-of-social-enterprise-in-society

Remembering the Future

You can’t realize your dreams by remembering where you came from. Memory and the act of remembering provides such a path. As a consequence, the act of remembering can best be described as a habituated neurochemical phenomenon that occurs mostly out of our awareness. Many of my clients report great difficulty in imagining a future state for themselves or their organizations that is significantly different from that with which they are already familiar. As a consequence, their futures are often only incremental improvements on what has gone before. The net of this is that their futures are uninspiring, boring, rote and devoid of true joy. They have futures that don’t make a difference! What if we could imagine with the same fidelity that we experience when we remember? What if we could remember our future with the same richness of emotion, thought, hormone secretion, and synaptic linkages? This is what the effective use of imagination makes possibleit literally recalibrates the holographic mind so that a different reality – a different memory – is experienced. Remembering the future is not a fantasy – it is a skill that is absolutely required of entrepreneurs. Remembering the future is about moving the possible to the probable. Your future and the future of your organization is in your imagination. Doing so positions you as a leader to insist that the people around us behave as if that future already exists.

Keywords: [“future”,”remembering”,”mind”]
Source: https://www.thriveglobal.com/stories/20225-rembering-the-future

Compassionate capitalism made me a Conservative

I started a business with my husband and lived through the challenges and failures that every entrepreneur faces. I witnessed the sacrifices that other business founders, leaders and entrepreneurs make to get their startups off the ground. In this way, I saw compassionate capitalism in action. When you’re in the business of pie creation, what you really care about is a government that understands how to help create more pie. Conservatism has always been about creating more pie. Conservative values and policies are the only ones that set people free to follow the dream of starting their own business. Why is it that the word entrepreneur is something we are OK with, but capitalist isn’t? And why is that some on the left can say “Capitalism doesn’t work” – and increasing numbers of people believe it? In my two and a half decades in business before I entered Parliament, much of it spent as an HR Director, I witnessed only a handful of rogue. The vast majority care about their people like they’re family. We must do much more to ensure that everyone has access to the capital and the opportunities that have enabled me, and entrepreneurs like me, to start businesses. For Conservatism to stay relevant, it must hold fast to its support for the brave person who risks their security for a dream: the entrepreneur, the compassionate capitalist. Capitalism does work, its compassionate and we must support it, fearlessly.

Keywords: [“business”,”entrepreneur”,”people”]
Source: https://capx.co/compassionate-capitalism-made-me-a-conservative/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – Value Creation

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Compassionate Capitalism and Local Community Publications

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc. Maria Peck, previously the director of the ACE Women’s Center, will lead one of ACE’s biggest projects slated to begin this year. “After three years of serving in the community as director of the ACE Women’s Business Center, I’m eager to have an impact on the local Hispanic community’s business growth by helping provide better access to capital,” says Peck. Peck’s focus will be on providing access to commercial loans of $50,000 and greater and being visible in the Hispanic community by giving presentations and collaborating with other organizations. Peck started working at ACE as a microlender after working with ACCION USA, owning her own business, and gaining more than 15 years of sales and marketing experience in Atlanta and New York. About Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc.ACE is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and CDFI loan fund that provides loans and business consulting services to help borrowers throughout Metro Atlanta and North Georgia create and grow stable, sustainable businesses that generate jobs. What communities/cities/counties will you be working with?Tell us more about what types of loans ACE provides to entrepreneurs? Karen has been described by some as a dominant force in the entrepreneur and investor markets with her blog, published articles, frequent speaking engagements, and her Compassionate Capitalist radio show. She has been a frequent speaker and mentor within numerous Small Business and Economic Development initiatives and was the recipient of the Advocate of the Year award in 2016 at the Flight to Freedom Summit in San Ramon, California, for her work to promote Compassionate Capitalism. Karen left the corporate world over a decade ago, having been involved with many product launches, to pursue her passion for seeing innovation funded and to help the entrepreneur and investor community she served create thriving businesses. Karen immersed herself in the world of angel investing, first as the protégé to the founder of the Network of Business Angels. The power of microtargeting to a businesses exact demographic by supporting their local community publication. The power of content branding and the opportunity to be the only business in their industry to be allowed to submit content for the duration of their sponsorship.

Keywords: [“Business”,”entrepreneur”,”ACE”]
Source: http://probusinesschannelusa.com/buckhead-business-show-access-to-capital-for-entrepreneurs-compassionate-capitalism-and-local-community-publications/

Understanding the debate around ‘compassionate capitalism’

NR Narayana Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. Since Sikka made his announcement on August 18, a wider debate has raged over whether a founder who has stepped down and is not a dominant shareholder, ought to indulge in the kind of public campaign that NRN mounted – rather than making an unambiguous choice between total detachment and committing himself to addressing Infy’s challenges as part of the board. The debate has also touched on issues of conformity to a company’s core cultural values and ethos. Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. Beginning 1994, Murthy’s ideal of the “Democratisation of wealth” saw practical manifestation in the granting of stock to company staff down to the level of drivers, and went on to contribute to a culture of donations from personal wealth by all the founders of the company. Compensation for the top deck has continued to soar higher above the company median in some of India’s celebrated private banks – at least one of which, interestingly, had an Infy-like culture of granting stock until some years ago. The National Stock Exchange of India Ltd was in a controversy regarding payouts to top executives. The counter-argument, of course, is that these practices are not illegal, and have the sanction of the board of directors and shareholders. In his annual letter to shareholders in 2006, Buffett made the point that compensation reform will only occur if the largest institutional shareholders demand a fresh look at the system. In India, the largest shareholder is LIC, which is owned by the government. Regulators in India have been careful not to intervene – even though the central bank has, in the past, shot down proposals from private and foreign banks to offer sign-on bonuses and parachutes designed to protect bosses who are fired. That’s the question shareholders – especially institutional shareholders – must put to those on the boards and the compensation and audit committees of many Indian firms.

Keywords: [“India”,”company”,”shareholder”]
Source: http://indianexpress.com/article/explained/understanding-the-debate-around-compassionate-capitalism-n-r-narayana-murthy-infosys-vishal-sikka-n-r-narayana-murthy-4805857/

Tea and Empathy with Daniel Goleman

If anyone deserves credit for bringing about this change in corporate culture, it’s Daniel Goleman. A former Harvard psychologist turned science reporter for the New York Times and then best-selling author, Goleman popularized the concept of “Emotional intelligence” in the mid-1990s. “Dan Goleman gave social intelligence a name, he codified it, and he broke out the elements in a usable way,” says Suzy Welch, former editor of the Harvard Business Review and coauthor, with her husband, Jack Welch, of Winning. Though some people think of his work as promoting artifice, by teaching people to suppress their genuine feelings, Goleman argues that emotional and social intelligence cannot be counterfeited. In the 1980s, several psychology researchers began using the term emotional intelligence in published work; Goleman encountered it in a 1990 article by Yale psychologists Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer. At the mention of “Emotional intelligence,” a scholarly conference can erupt into booing, and entire Web sites are devoted to criticizing Goleman as a self-promoter. “One thing Goleman doesn’t talk about is that being put in a position of power drains the emotional intelligence from most people,” says Robert I. Sutton, professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and the author of The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t. The counterargument, put forth by Goleman and his colleagues, is that the practice of building emotional intelligence in individuals ripples out to change the larger corporate culture. Odyssey of a Participant-ObserverThe value of social intelligence was apparent to Dan Goleman early in his life. The runaway success of Emotional Intelligence changed the lives of everyone involved, even the people whose work Goleman briefly described within. Goleman quit writing for the New York Times to focus on books and cofounding a new research organization: the Consortium for Research on Emo­tional Intelligence in Organizations. In addition to CREIO, Goleman cofounded the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, or CASEL, which is focused on programs for preschool through high school.

Keywords: [“Goleman”,”emotional”,”intelligence”]
Source: https://www.strategy-business.com/article/08308?gko=b3d2e