J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 08-23-2018

A Christmas Carol Quotes from LitCharts

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Lorem iLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing el. 

Lorem ipLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pari. 

Keywords: [“dolor”,”dolore”,”sit”]
Source: https://www.litcharts.com/lit/a-christmas-carol/quotes

Anand Krishna’s musings

As a citizen of Bangalore, I am currently more worried about electricity. The monsoons in Karnataka have been far below normal. Several districts are lkely to be declared as drought-affected. This has an adverse impact on power generation and therefore, distribution. At a time like this, the BJP’s poll promise to supply free or highly-subsidized power for irrigation will come back to bite it. 

I read a report in today’s Bangalore edition of the Times of India that former Chief Minister S. Bangarappa has called upon farmers to destroy the meters proposed to be installed. Some have large land holdings and generate millions of Rupees in revenue, if not profit, each year. 

Keywords: [“power”,”free”,”given”]
Source: https://anandkrishna.wordpress.com/tag/compassionate-capitalism

Hidden Brain

July 2, 2018 There is great comfort in the familiar. It’s one reason humans often flock to other people who share the same interests, laugh at the same jokes, hold the same political views. Familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity. From science and business to music and the world of fashion, researchers have found that people with deep connections to people from other countries and cultures often see benefits in terms of their creative output. This week on Hidden Brain, we look at the powerful connection between the ideas we dream up and the people who surround us, and what it really takes to think outside the box. 

Keywords: [“people”,”same”,”connection”]
Source: https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510308/hidden-brain

061, Raj Sisodia, Conscious Capitalism, Inc.

Raj Sisodia is one of the thought leaders of the Conscious Capitalism movement. His books Firms of Endearment and Conscious Capitalism were major influences on my thinking about social entrepreneurship. They are part of the reason that I produce Social Entrepreneur today. In this interview, Raj describes the research he conducted on marketing and how he began to understand that there was a better way of doing business – a more conscious form of capitalism. He also talks about his new book Shakti Leadership: Embracing Feminine and Masculine Power in Business. ‘Many of these companies talk openly about building a business on love. 

Keywords: [“business”,”end”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://tonyloyd.com/061-2

Richard Pryor 40 Years Ago: ‘Promoting Racism Is Part of Capitalism’

Police killings of unarmed black people have poured gasoline on the race relations debate in America, but the United States has been a divided country since its founding. In a television interview with journalist Bill Boggs, the late, great comedian explained why white America doesn’t want to stop racism. For some bonus material, Pryor talks about his comedic influences with James Earl Jones and gets roasted. A journalist and innovator with two decades in digital media, Ortiz founded the mobile app startup Evrybit, a live storytelling and reporting tool, as a 2014 John. 

Keywords: [“people”,”talks”,”Pryor”]
Source: https://www.truthdig.com/articles/richard-pryor-40-years-ago…

The Heart & Science of Philanthropy

Philanthropy has the power to ensure all people have an equal opportunity to achieve their full potential. Seattle Foundation provides the expertise, network of partners and research that enables philanthropists to maximize their impact in meeting our community’s most critical needs. Every day, we convene, communicate with and catalyze our philanthropic partners, uniting passion and discipline to create lasting change. We call this intersection the heart and science of philanthropy. Visit the GIVEBIG website to learn about the community nonprofits we work with. 

Keywords: [“community”,”partners”,”Philanthropy”]
Source: https://www.seattlefoundation.org

Affluenza…The Show

Glenn Stanton shakes his head with a look of mild disgust. Mere miles from alpine meadows and mountain creeks, one would think more people would take the time to stop and smell the pine needles. A free-market conservative, Stanton believes the American economic system is the best there is. Materialism and mall mania are taking a toll on the country, he says. Some family therapists warn that the price is a culture in which people treat one another like products. 

Beyond that, arguments about money are known to play a central role in 90 percent of divorce cases. 

Keywords: [“Stanton”,”people”,”Family”]
Source: http://www.pbs.org/kcts/affluenza/show/stanton.html

Temple Of Goddess Spirituality

The Goddess Temple is a project of the Center for the Study of the Gift Economy under the direction of Genevieve Vaughan. Here, feminine values are honored and the Divine Mother is revered. The sand-colored stucco Temple opens to the elements of nature, with archways to the four directions and an open roof to the sky. Peace and reverence live within the temple, welcoming all that come. Together in ritual we celebrate the dance of the earth, sun, and moon. 

All are invited to pray, meditate, and connect with the Divine Feminine that is within and around us. 

Keywords: [“Temple”,”within”,”open”]
Source: https://sekhmettemple.com

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-31-2018

A Case for Compassionate Capitalism

Interestingly, a walk through the history of economy activities in America shows that pure Capitalism had never dominated the socio-political landscape for a long stretch of time. In fact it has been an intriguing battle between the government controlled mixed economy and free market Capitalism all along. Ronald Reagan was a strong supporter of the free market capitalism and introduced measures to reduce government control and taxes. Why hasn’t then Capitalism won its case convincingly across the globe and even in America and darwinized other economic systems – just as cell phones today are driving land-phones out of the market. Capitalism can create an enormous amount of aggregated wealth but also the disparity that provokes class warfare. 

To our point, the downturn leaves a long lasting emotional scar and is perceived as the overall failure of Capitalism. Third, success of free market Capitalism relies on the doctrine that market is efficient in processing information and that all relevant information is readily available to everyone. Such exploitations give Capitalism the bad name that it promotes one’s accumulation of wealth at the expense of others’. In spite of all the criticism, Capitalism will stake its claim in creating wealth and improving living standards for more people in the society than has otherwise been possible. Corporate world will have to swear allegiance to a more compassionate form of capitalism – not only because it is their moral obligation to the society but also because their long run sustainability will depend on it. 

Analyzing the action of firms that are strong advocate of Compassionate Capitalism, it is also observed that often their philanthropic activities take form of strategic alliance. To support the new world order Capitalism will have to embrace socialism. 

Keywords: [“government”,”market”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://dasarnab.wordpress.com/…/a-case-for-compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism

God is good to bring us on a journey that includes friends that become like family along the way. In our quest to bring hope and help to America’s Gold Star families, there have been a few individuals that have also brought their businesses along for the ride. We met Chris Gannon because the Rebacks love fried chicken. At the time, Chris was managing a local PDQ franchise that his family owned. His family is of Outback Steakhouse, Carraba’s, Bonefish Grill, and PDQ fame. 

Chris is one of the first people I called when I had this crazy idea of intersecting civilians and Gold Star families, and he jumped in with both feet. Chris and Tim Gannon have given us food for nearly every event, opened their homes, brought other corporations on board, and been more than just a promoter of Believe With methey have swung hammers and given of their talent, their time and effort as well. They have been eager to give back to America’s Gold Star families knowing that their success is because of the sacrifices of those who serve in our military. Chris leaves it on his mantle year round as a reminder that there are families all across this nation that have given their sons and daughters for our every freedom and opportunity. His understanding of serving and giving has been shaped by intersecting with our Gold Star familiesand our capacity to give back to those who have paid for our freedoms with their loved ones has been multiplied because of families like the Gannons. 

So if you love our Gold Star families, then feel good about giving your hard earned money to restauranteurs like the Gannons. Have a bloomin’ onion and know that every time you do, you’re helping us give back to those who have given us their ALL. Consider Sharing to Support Gold Star Families. 

Keywords: [“family”,”Star”,”Gold”]
Source: https://believewithme.com/2017/04/24/compassionate-capitalism

Why Are People So Mean? Has The Internet Destroyed Empathy & Compassion? – Collective Evolution

After reading the story I felt a deep sense of sadness for the people involved in the tragedy, even shedding an empathetic tear thinking about how truly horrible it would have been to go through something like that. I was completely shocked by what some people had written. Something I’ve come to notice within my experience at Collective Evolution and with the world of the internet as a whole is the large sense of disconnect there seems to be between the people and their words. I’ve seen people say some pretty nasty things to one another in the comment sections, even personally attacking different writers of the CE team for articles that challenge their belief systems. Truth be told, the internet can be a treacherous world full of cynicism, harassment, and bullying, leaving many to feel hurt or offended by the unfiltered words of public. 

You Can’t See Me So. For the most part, people don’t speak to one another in public as they do online, instead there is usually a mutual respect for someone else’s opinion and equal reciprocation within a conversation or debate. People are open and genuinely nice to each other, not slamming someone for having a certain belief. Many people are desensitizing their neural circuits to the horrors they see, while not getting much, if any, off-line training in empathic skills. When we lose sight of compassion and empathy, we are losing touch with what it means to be human, and essentially reality. 

Lastly, the one tool that I believe will truly help anyone in their life is the use of empathy. Empathy means to really connect with and understand another person’s situation, feelings, or difficulties. If we all practiced bringing more empathy into our lives, the world would be a much better place for it. 

Keywords: [“people”,”someone”,”empathy”]
Source: http://www.collective-evolution.com/2014/05/08/why-are-people-so-mean-has…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-30-2018

Compassionate Capitalist – When Angel Investors are “Takers”

What Kind of Capitalism Should India Have?

Though the term ‘compassionate capitalism’ has been a part of public discourse outside India for some years now, the current spotlight on it in India is largely due to N.R. Narayana Murthy, the co-founder of Infosys. His most recent reference to it was occasioned by the hike in former CEO Vishal Sikka’s salary, which made it 935 times the median pay at Infosys last fiscal; the extraordinary severance compensation paid to Rajiv Bansal, former Infosys CFO, on his exit from the company and a pay hike of 35% to COO Pravin Rao. Describing his philosophy of compassionate capitalism, Murthy said it was capitalism in mind and socialism at heart, a creed which looks at fairness and at ensuring that everyone is better off. In FY16, at least 27 directors earned at least 100 times more than an average employee, whereas under a saner capitalism the ratio between highest compensation in the firm and the median salary should ideally be 50-60. 

Compassionate capitalism as a term became a part of public discourse globally largely after the economic crisis of 2008 and Thomas Piketty’s seminal publication, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, which highlighted the growing disparity between the haves and the have nots of this world, and movements like Occupy Wall Street. Picketty confirmed that though capitalism is central to the innovation and entrepreneurial risk-taking needed for economic growth, inequality does not naturally or automatically decline under capitalism and that capitalist growth leads to greater inequality because of the higher rate of return on capital compared with the low overall growth rate of the economy, or to put it another way, income from investments rises faster than wages. Several economists like William Easterly, professor of economics at New York University and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, have argued in favour of traditional capitalism because it helps the poor; others believe that insisting on greater equality will distract businesses from their primary goal of making profits. In the UK, 10% of profits were returned to shareholders in 1970; this figure is now 70%. In India, the figure is lower but is growing rapidly, and for many corporations it is now higher than 50%. 

Since a majority of shareholders are among the richest in society, the benefit goes largely to the rich, increasing inequality. According to recent research by Forbes and the International Monetary Fund, the wealth of 101 Indian billionaires equals 13% of country’s GDP. Every dollar of profit given to the shareholders of corporations is a dollar that could have been spent paying producers or workers more, paying more tax, or investing in infrastructure or innovation. A laissez faire capitalism which embodies an ‘I am alright Jack, and the devil take the hindmost’ attitude will no longer do. Apart from communism, reform advocacy has ranged from welfare capitalism to Gandhi’s theories of decentralised production by small individual owner producers, along with trusteeship of the wealthy; corporate and individual philanthropy; mandatory corporate social responsibility contributions from companies, to variations of compassionate capitalism such as ‘inclusive capitalism’, the ‘humane capitalism’ of Muhammad Yunus and the ‘creative capitalism’ of Bill Gates. 

Compassionate capitalism must also emphasise conscious reciprocity, a concept which implies that the giver gets as much as the receiver. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”company”,”profit”]
Source: https://thewire.in/economy/capitalism-inequality-india

Compassionate Capitalism

God is good to bring us on a journey that includes friends that become like family along the way. In our quest to bring hope and help to America’s Gold Star families, there have been a few individuals that have also brought their businesses along for the ride. We met Chris Gannon because the Rebacks love fried chicken. At the time, Chris was managing a local PDQ franchise that his family owned. His family is of Outback Steakhouse, Carraba’s, Bonefish Grill, and PDQ fame. 

Chris is one of the first people I called when I had this crazy idea of intersecting civilians and Gold Star families, and he jumped in with both feet. Chris and Tim Gannon have given us food for nearly every event, opened their homes, brought other corporations on board, and been more than just a promoter of Believe With methey have swung hammers and given of their talent, their time and effort as well. They have been eager to give back to America’s Gold Star families knowing that their success is because of the sacrifices of those who serve in our military. Chris leaves it on his mantle year round as a reminder that there are families all across this nation that have given their sons and daughters for our every freedom and opportunity. His understanding of serving and giving has been shaped by intersecting with our Gold Star familiesand our capacity to give back to those who have paid for our freedoms with their loved ones has been multiplied because of families like the Gannons. 

So if you love our Gold Star families, then feel good about giving your hard earned money to restauranteurs like the Gannons. Have a bloomin’ onion and know that every time you do, you’re helping us give back to those who have given us their ALL. Consider Sharing to Support Gold Star Families. 

Keywords: [“family”,”Star”,”Gold”]
Source: https://believewithme.com/2017/04/24/compassionate-capitalism/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-09-2018

Weber: “A Shell as Hard as Steel”

Weber explores the emergence of economic rationalism as one of the most important aspects of the evolving modern society, and does so by tracing rationalism to the Protestant ethic, which later began to disintegrate as time progressed, and involuntarily resulted in being the foundation of capitalism. Ultimately, the Protestant ethic caused asceticism, rational behavior, and disenchantment of the world, which then became the spirit of capitalism. Through the religious roots of Protestantism and asceticism, the spirit of capitalism emerged and created the foundation of today. The modern implications of economic rationalism was that the future of the modern world was not going to experience compassion like the religious roots of our history, but was going to experience a future promising a ceaseless global struggle over material resources and alternative modes of life. A religious value was placed on ceaseless, constant, systematic labor in a secular calling as the very highest ascetic path and proof of genuine faith, but this is not seen in today’s economic system. If Weber was living today, I believe that he would be disgusted and scared for the future of the world – exactly what he had feared had happened. People today are now alienated from their jobs and do it as a means to an end; it is not mentally satisfying and there is no spiritual connection to be found.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”religious”,”modern”]
Source: https://michellebkim.wordpress.com/2012/10/13/weber

Compassion Church of Charlotte – Pastor Ann

Those who will help: It is clear that we are now waiting for the person or people who are going to work on the physical aspects of this church. Please contact me if God has called you and together we will move forward. Why me and why this church: I wanted to make a positive change for the Lord. I will pastor this church with the understanding that as a leader, I am held to a higher standard and will be judged more severely should I fail the family of God. There are many reasons that this is true, including: a mistrust of religious leaders, a lack of response of churches to a changing society, a culture of greed, hostility toward others, a lack of information about God and his son Jesus, discomfort with church attendance, a lack of a feeling of belonging. Compassion Church is not designed to give people religion but to light the path to God through Christ Jesus. The Compassion Church is beginning as a blog site in an effort to be clear about purpose, respond to questions, and provide a place to find answers and begin to establish a sense of belonging. This is the groundwork for the place to meet and for the people who seek God and not religion. This church believes that God is our father/creator and that he gave us his son Jesus who died as a sacrifice for us and was resurrected. Each gathering of God’s people requires some planning and determination.

Keywords: [“God”,”church”,”people”]
Source: https://compassionchurchofcharlotte.wordpress.com

The Real Thief of Holiday Cheer: Capitalism

There is only one victim to blame for this: holiday shopping. In order to understand the issue involved with society’s holiday shopping obsession, it is first imperative to understand civilization’s goal of happiness. By giving up time that could be used to celebrate holidays together, and instead participating in the holiday shopping craze, families and friends are allowing capitalism to steal their chances at true happiness. Aristotle is not the only philosopher to consider this; Karl Marx’s focus on the familial unit conveys that holiday shopping is not worth abandoning time that could be shared amongst family members. In addition to Aristotle and Marx, Pope Leo XIII would also advocate for the elimination of high-strung holiday shopping because of its unfair requirements of workers. In order to supply enough support for holiday shopping, capitalism is acting as a thief that steals employees away from their families. Again, holiday shopping goes directly against a valued leader and ruins the chances of families’ holiday cheer. Today their arguments are overlooked by thousands of crazed holiday shoppers. People today are increasingly being drawn to material items, instead of holiday cheer, and focusing on gifts over relationships. Capitalism has officially become the new Grinch that stole America’s holiday spirit and happiness.

Keywords: [“holiday”,”family”,”happiness”]
Source: https://bearmarketreview.wordpress.com/2014/12/09/the-real-thief…

How Capitalism Obliterated the Constitution and Destroyed America – the truth with no restriction

The sad truth is that adjusted for the cost of living, millions of their employees make less money than they did ten years ago. The truth is that capitalism has failed the majority of Americans. During the great recession of 2008, as the working class was devastated, the profits of corporations actually increased as offshore banking accounts became overstuffed with cash. If a fascist such as Donald Trump ever becomes our president, capitalists will flourish and then crash as a second American revolution crushes the government and removes corporations from their control over our nation. No one need look any farther to see the failure of capitalism than the economic disparity in America today. More families are living at or near the poverty level than at any time in history since the great depression of 1929. There is no excuse for one American living in poverty or forced to become homeless when our nation allows such a huge number of men and women to live lives of privilege. The American people now live under the control of an oligarchy which is quickly moving towards a plutocracy. Your vote no longer counts; our elected officials seek office for their own advancement, not to serve the American people. If you doubt my words, think about how special interests control every decision made by our government thanks to lobbyists.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”live”,”more”]
Source: https://thetruthwithnorestriction.wordpress.com/2016/07/02/how…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-05-2018

SparkNotes: The Jungle: Themes

The main theme of The Jungle is the evil of capitalism. Every event, especially in the first twenty-seven chapters of the book, is chosen deliberately to portray a particular failure of capitalism, which is, in Sinclair’s view, inhuman, destructive, unjust, brutal, and violent. The slow annihilation of Jurgis’s immigrant family at the hands of a cruel and prejudiced economic and social system demonstrates the effect of capitalism on the working class as a whole. As the immigrants, who initially possess an idealistic faith in the American Dream of hard work leading to material success, are slowly used up, tortured, and destroyed, the novel relentlessly illustrates that capitalism is to blame for their plight and emphasizes that the characters’ individual stories are the stories of millions of people. The Jungle is not a thematically nuanced or complicated novel: capitalism is simply portrayed as a total evil, from its greedy destruction of children to its cynical willingness to sell diseased meat to an unsuspecting public. Sinclair opts not to explore the psychology of capitalism; instead, he simply presents a long litany of the ugly effects of capitalism on the world. In Sinclair’s view, socialism is the cure for all of the problems that capitalism creates. When socialism is introduced, it is shown to be as good as capitalism is evil; whereas capitalism destroys the many for the benefit of the few, socialism works for the benefit of everyone. Because the family that Sinclair uses to represent the struggle of the working class under capitalism is a group of Lithuanian immigrants, the novel is also able to explore the plight of immigrants in America. Sinclair doesn’t attack the American Dream; instead, he uses the disintegration of the family to illustrate his belief that capitalism itself is an attack on the values that support the American Dream, which has long since been rendered hollow by the immoral value of greed.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”work”,”family”]
Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/jungle/themes

Vagammon Narayana Murthy teaches corporates about ‘Compassionate Capitalism’

Corporate thought-leader and Infosys co-founder NR Narayana Murthy has flayed the high wage hikes that senior managements have been apportioning to themselves when the software industry is in trying times and has advised them to make “Sacrifices” to maintain common man’s faith in capitalism. Conceding that times are difficult for the IT services sector, Murthy dismissed the commonly attributed threats of artificial intelligence and automation as “More hype than reality”. Terming the trend of no hikes for juniors and freshers as “Worrisome,” Murthy rued that the senior level people have been taking handsome hikes. “I think that is not the way to make capitalism acceptable to the larger masses in a country that has huge poverty,” he said, speaking at the IIT-Bombay over the weekend. “If we believe in capitalism, if we believe that is the best solution for the country to move forward, then the leaders of capitalism will have to demonstrate self-restraints in apportioning to themselves the part of the benefits that come out of running companies, Murthy, who mostly flies the economy class, added.” Murthy, a strong proponent of “Compassionate capitalism” since his days in the company, did not make any reference to Infosys. It can be noted that over the past few months, Murthy had gone public with his displeasure over senior executive compensation at Infosys. Speaking before the students at the prestigious institute, Murthy said in the last seven years, the salaries of freshers in the software industry have stayed stagnant while the same for senior-level employees have grown by up to 1,000 per cent. “There is this whole thing about automation and artificial intelligence. That is much more hype than the reality, at-least in the software services,” Murthy said. The domestic IT sector employs over 4 million directly and its revenues have crossed over USD 150 billion, according to industry lobby Nasscom.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”capitalism”,”over”]
Source: https://www.vagammon.com/narayana-murthy-teaches-corporates-about…

How Capitalism Creates The Welfare State « The Dish

The more capitalism and wealth, the familiar argument goes, the better able we are to do without a safety net for the poor, elderly, sick and young. What it doesn’t get at is that the forces that free market capitalism unleashes are precisely the forces that undermine traditional forms of community and family that once served as a traditional safety net, free from government control. In the West, it happened slowly – with the welfare state emerging in 19th century Germany and spreading elsewhere, as individuals uprooted themselves from their home towns and forged new careers, lives and families in the big cities, with all the broken homes, deserted villages, and bewildered families they left behind. We can forget this but the cultural contradictions of capitalism, brilliantly explained in Daniel Bell’s classic volume, are indeed contradictions. They did so in part for humane reasons – but also because they realized that unless capitalism red in tooth and claw were complemented by some collective cushioning, it would soon fall prey to more revolutionary movements. The safety net was created to save capitalism from itself, not to attack capitalism. This is not to argue against the conservative notion that it is precisely because of capitalism that we have to foster greater family bonds, keep marriage alive, communities together. The forces of global capitalism – now unleashed on an unprecedented global scale with China, Russia, Brazil and India – are destroying the kind of society which allows and encourages stability, traditional families, and self-sufficient community. One reason, I think, that Obama’s move toward a slightly more effective welfare state has not met strong resistance – and is clearly winning the American argument – is that the sheer force of this global capitalism is coming to bear down on America more fiercely than ever before. Capitalism destroys the very structure of the societies it enriches.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”family”,”conservative”]
Source: http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/…/how-capitalism-creates-the-welfare-state

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-01-2018

SparkNotes: The Jungle: Themes

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. The main theme of The Jungle is the evil of capitalism. Every event, especially in the first twenty-seven chapters of the book, is chosen deliberately to portray a particular failure of capitalism, which is, in Sinclair’s view, inhuman, destructive, unjust, brutal, and violent. The slow annihilation of Jurgis’s immigrant family at the hands of a cruel and prejudiced economic and social system demonstrates the effect of capitalism on the working class as a whole. As the immigrants, who initially possess an idealistic faith in the American Dream of hard work leading to material success, are slowly used up, tortured, and destroyed, the novel relentlessly illustrates that capitalism is to blame for their plight and emphasizes that the characters’ individual stories are the stories of millions of people. The Jungle is not a thematically nuanced or complicated novel: capitalism is simply portrayed as a total evil, from its greedy destruction of children to its cynical willingness to sell diseased meat to an unsuspecting public. Sinclair opts not to explore the psychology of capitalism; instead, he simply presents a long litany of the ugly effects of capitalism on the world. In Sinclair’s view, socialism is the cure for all of the problems that capitalism creates. When Jurgis discovers socialist politics in Chapter 28, it becomes clear that the novel’s attack on capitalism is meant to persuade the reader of the desirability of the socialist alternative. When socialism is introduced, it is shown to be as good as capitalism is evil; whereas capitalism destroys the many for the benefit of the few, socialism works for the benefit of everyone. Because the family that Sinclair uses to represent the struggle of the working class under capitalism is a group of Lithuanian immigrants, the novel is also able to explore the plight of immigrants in America. Sinclair doesn’t attack the American Dream; instead, he uses the disintegration of the family to illustrate his belief that capitalism itself is an attack on the values that support the American Dream, which has long since been rendered hollow by the immoral value of greed.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”work”,”family”]
Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/jungle/themes.html

Compassionate Capitalism

He looked at the crisis of chronic poverty in the developing world, and saw the two essential ingredients necessary for lifting millions of women and men out of economic impoverishment: “Credit” and “Entrepreneurship.” By providing credit in the form of a small loan at fair-market value to poor, jobless people who had no collateral to borrow money from a conventional bank, he became a pioneer of what now is known as “Microfinance.” The insight was to help others help themselves by giving them the jumpstart they needed to start a small business of their own. Over the years, Mr. Whittaker’s Christian ecumenical humanitarian organization, Opportunity International, has lived up to its growing reputation of giving the poor an alternative to charity. Today, this non-profit group creates entrepreneurial empowerment by providing loans and job training directly to poor people at the grassroots level. It’s not about a “Handout.” It’s about showing people how to work their “Way out” of chronic poverty – that which Colin Powell calls “The greatest moral challenge of the 21st century.” By 2007, the organization plans to finance 1 million poor entrepreneurs per year; and by 2010 its goal is to finance 2 million people per year into their own businesses. 98 percent of its clients pay their loans back on time and at market-rate interest! Notions that the poor are not creditworthy are shattered by this reality. Given access to credit and capital, capitalism can be democratized. This is really the story of compassionate capitalism, or of what we like to call “Venture capital energizing the spirit of entrepreneurship among the working poor.” It’s like playing football. People must be able to feed themselves and their families. For the majority of the world’s hungry people, food is available. Microfinance is the jumpstart so many people need to begin the process of meeting their most basic human needs; and then, accumulated capital can be saved and invested towards purchasing a home and property to begin the process of real wealth-building. The bottom line is that we must do more to narrow that gap between the rich and poor in our world.

Keywords: [“people”,”poor”,”capital”]
Source: http://www.freedomworks.org/content/compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate capitalism

He looked at the crisis of chronic poverty in the developing world, and saw the two essential ingredients necessary for lifting millions of women and men out of economic impoverishment: “Credit” and “Entrepreneurship.” By providing credit in the form of a small loan at fair-market value to poor, jobless people who had no collateral to borrow money from a conventional bank, he became a pioneer of what now is known as “Microfinance.” The insight was to help others help themselves by giving them the jumpstart they needed to start a small business of their own. Over the years, Mr. Whittaker’s Christian ecumenical humanitarian organization, Opportunity International, has lived up to its growing reputation of giving the poor an alternative to charity. Today, this non-profit group creates entrepreneurial empowerment by providing loans and job training directly to poor people at the grassroots level. It’s not about a “Handout.” It’s about showing people how to work their “Way out” of chronic poverty – that which Colin Powell calls “The greatest moral challenge of the 21st century.” By 2007, the organization plans to finance 1 million poor entrepreneurs per year; and by 2010 its goal is to finance 2 million people per year into their own businesses. 98 percent of its clients pay their loans back on time and at market-rate interest! Notions that the poor are not creditworthy are shattered by this reality. Given access to credit and capital, capitalism can be democratized. This is really the story of compassionate capitalism, or of what we like to call “Venture capital energizing the spirit of entrepreneurship among the working poor.” It’s like playing football. People must be able to feed themselves and their families. For the majority of the world’s hungry people, food is available. Microfinance is the jumpstart so many people need to begin the process of meeting their most basic human needs; and then, accumulated capital can be saved and invested towards purchasing a home and property to begin the process of real wealth-building. The bottom line is that we must do more to narrow that gap between the rich and poor in our world.

Keywords: [“people”,”poor”,”capital”]
Source: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2003/aug/26/20030826-092641-9624r

JR Test Site News for 01-23-2018

free essay on Women during the Enlightenment

In many ways, the position of women was seriously degraded during the Enlightenment. Economically, the rise of capitalism produced laws that severely restricted women’s rights to own property and run businesses. I believe that this was unfair and very sexist of the way Enlightenment thinkers thought about how women and men differ because of their gender. Just because a woman’s gender, she can only marry if she was part of a family, the family would usually make up the dowry. If she was on her own then she had to save enough money to pay her own dowry. Not only were women treated as nothing but maids and wives, with their harsh income, they were required to invest in the household economy before she could join it. If a woman was born into an agricultural community or in an artisan’s family, they began tasks as productive laborers in the family economy at the age of six or seven. On the farm women’s labor was less appreciated, and women almost always left home between the ages of eleven and fourteen to either work on another farm or become a servant in a household. I think it is very wrong to make women act like slaves because they were considered far more inferior than men, who basically got the better education. Enlightenment thinkers also believed that the various intellectual disciplines, such as science and philosophy, were meant only for men. So while men were learning the new sciences and philosophies, all that was offered to women in education was decorative “Accomplishments.” I think that those years were morally wrong because the Enlightenment stressed the absolute importance of education for moral development and the ideal operation of society. This education was only open to wealthy women who could afford to pay for it. I think that this time period was very brutal and unfair to women. Especially that standing up for equality wasn’t easy at all.

Keywords: [“women”,”think”,”family”]
Source: http://www.echeat.com/free-essay/Women-during-the-Enlightenment-32413.aspx

Influence of Enlightenment on Economic & Social Thought

The Enlightenment of 18th century was an extension of the scientific revolution in which rational thought and reason was extended from nature to society. Thinkers of the Enlightenment, known as philosophes, completely rejected the supremacy of religion, superstition and Church authority and replaced it with reason. Enlightenment synthesized Greek inclination on rational thinking, Stoic emphasis on natural law and Christen idea of equality of man. Enlightenment thus had a profound impact on the social and economic thinking of that time. The thinkers of enlightenment shattered the influence of superstition, revelations and priestly authority and emphasized the importance of human intelligence and rational thinking. In the words of Immanuel Kant, “Enlightenment is man’s leaving his self-caused immaturity”. Thinkers of this era argued that reason alone is sufficient to reform societies. John Locke, one of the principle figures of Enlightenment, advocated for religious tolerance, human equality and liberty. The American Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights all reflect the ideals of Enlightenment such as all men are created equal and possess inalienable rights of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. The age of Enlightenment also had a profound effect on the economy. As people moved from rural areas to cities, economic reliance shifted from agriculture to non-agriculture products. Although most of the thinkers of Enlightenment were deists and believed in one God, they denounced religious mysteries, miracles and prophecies. Some took a more extreme approach and denied the existence of God and attributed the notion to human ignorance, superstition and fear. The thinkers of Enlightenment also denounced slavery and slave trade. Enlightenment thus played a pivotal role in transforming social, political, religious and economic life in Europe.

Keywords: [“Enlightenment”,”Thinkers”,”human”]
Source: https://mmuntazir.wordpress.com/2011/03/04/influence-of…

www.theory.org.uk Resources: Theodor Adorno

Adorno argued that capitalism fed people with the products of a ‘culture industry’ – the opposite of ‘true’ art – to keep them passively satisfied and politically apathetic. Adorno saw that capitalism had not become more precarious or close to collapse, as Marx had predicted. Where Marx had focussed on economics, Adorno placed emphasis on the role of culture in securing the status quo. Popular culture was identified as the reason for people’s passive satisfaction and lack of interest in overthrowing the capitalist system. Adorno suggested that culture industries churn out a debased mass of unsophisticated, sentimental products which have replaced the more ‘difficult’ and critical art forms which might lead people to actually question social life. False needs are cultivated in people by the culture industries. These are needs which can be both created and satisfied by the capitalist system, and which replace people’s ‘true’ needs – freedom, full expression of human potential and creativity, genuine creative happiness. Commodity fetishism means that social relations and cultural experiences are objectified in terms of money. We are delighted by something because of how much it cost. Popular media and music products are characterised by standardisation and pseudo-individualisation. Products of the culture industry may be emotional or apparently moving, but Adorno sees this as cathartic – we might seek some comfort in a sad film or song, have a bit of a cry, and then feel restored again. Boiled down to its most obvious modern-day application, the argument would be that television leads people away from talking to each other or questioning the oppression in their lives. Instead they get up and go to work, come home and switch on TV, absorb TV’s nonsense until bedtime, and then the daily cycle starts again. You can study this further with the books and links below.

Keywords: [“culture”,”people”,”Adorno”]
Source: http://www.theory.org.uk/ctr-ador.htm

JR Test Site News for 01-19-2018

Encyclopedia of Libertarianism

The Enlightenment developed those features of the modern world that most libertarians prize-liberal politics and free markets, scientific progress, and technological innovation. The Enlightenment took the intellectual revolutions of the early modern 17th century and transformed European and American society in the 18th century. The Enlightenment was the product of thousands of brilliant and hardworking individuals, yet two Englishmen are most often identified as inaugurating it: John Locke, for his work on reason, empiricism, and liberal politics; and Isaac Newton, for his work on physics and mathematics. Enlightenment intellectuals stressed man’s autonomy and his capacity for forming his own character-in contrast to the premodern emphasis on dependence and original sin. Most important, modern thinkers began to emphasize the individual, arguing that the individual’s mind is sovereign and that the individual is an end in himself-in contrast to the premodernist, feudal subordination of the individual to higher political, social, or religious authorities. If reason is a faculty of the individual, then individualism becomes crucial to our understanding of ethics. Enlightenment thinkers laid the foundations of all the major branches of science. During the Enlightenment, antislavery societies were formed in America in 1784, in England in 1787, and a year later in France; in 1791 and 1792, Olympe de Gouges’s Declaration of the Rights of Women and Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women, landmarks in the movement for women’s liberty and equality, were published. Capitalist economics is based on the principle that individuals should be left free to make their own decisions about production, consumption, and trade. Enlightenment thinkers came to be profoundly convinced that every human problem could be solved and that the human condition could be raised to new and as-yet unimagined heights. Every individual possessed the power of reason, and education could become universal and illiteracy and superstition eliminated. Not all commentators regarded the Enlightenment as unrelievably progressive. Conservatives leveled three broad criticisms-that the Enlightenment’s rationalism undermined religious faith, that the Enlightenment’s individualism undermined communal ties, and that by overemphasizing the powers of reason and individual freedom the Enlightenment led to revolutions that instituted changes of such rapidity that they undermined social stability. Socialists also offered three criticisms-that the Enlightenment’s idolatry of science and technology led to an artificial world of dehumanizing machines and gadgets; that the Enlightenment’s competitive individualism and capitalism destroyed community and led to severe inequalities; and that the combination of science, technology, and capitalism inevitably led to technocratic oppression by the haves against the have-nots. Contemporary debates over the significance of the Enlightenment thus have a threefold character-between those who see it as a threat to an essentially religious-traditionalist vision, those who see it as a threat to an essentially Left-egalitarian vision, and those who see it as the foundation of the magnificent achievements of the modern scientific and liberal-democratic world.

Keywords: [“Enlightenment”,”individual”,”reason”]
Source: https://www.libertarianism.org/encyclopedia/enlightenment

Marriage and the Family

Marriage and the Family An Ideological Battleground An excerpt from Sexual Correctness: The Gender-Feminist Attack on Women By Wendy McElroy To the sexually correct feminist, marriage oppresses women and the family breeds patriarchy. In short, the family is the foundation of patriarchal capitalism, which gender feminists claim is the source of women’s oppression. Virtually all feminists share a belief that men and women experience the family in totally different ways. Their support….”…is deceptive and far more insidious, and has taken an enormous toll. Many women find it hard to resist the promise of a caring, equal relationship with a sympathetic man.” The truly radical assault on the family began with Kate Millett’s book Sexual Politics. “Then , there was a women’s movement that criticized…war as male ejaculation. It criticized marriage and the family as institutional crucibles of male privilege….Some criticized sex, including the institution of intercourse, as a strategy and practice in subordination.” The titles of popular feminist books from the early movement underscore the schism between gender feminists and women who chose domesticity. Gender Feminist Catharine MacKinnon describes the shift from the liberal view marriage, family and heterosexual sex: Gender feminists’ scorn for marriage and the family has not only distanced them from liberals, but from the majority of women who have chosen marriage and motherhood. Gender feminists consider marriage to be an involuntary state, in which women have the status of chattel. Engels – much quoted by Kate Millett, a pioneer of gender theory – was contemptuous of the notion that the family had subordinated women throughout history. On the family farm, it is claimed, the spheres of men’s and women’s work were indistinct. “Women have been seasoned as slaves and prostitutes…But no matter how we’re seasoned – as prostitute or as wife, which is the same thing – we’re seasoned in the patriarchal family almost exclusively to serve sexual functions.” These opinions were backed up with action. Gender feminism’s view of the family has divided women into hostile camps. Most women – however much they might want to reform marriage – do not want to abolish their husbands and children. “The earliest claims that the personal is political came from those gender feminists of the 1960s and 1970s who argued that, since the family was at the root of women’s oppression, it must be ‘smashed’.” Okin argues that the family – the so-called personal sphere – must be opened to political change, by force if necessary. What about couples who wish to maintain a more traditional marriage? What of those women who want to work out the terms of their family structure for themselves, with their husbands? Okin argues that such personal desires are irrelevant: the family is too important a social institution to be abandoned to the arbitrary wishes of the individuals involved. Regarding the issue of marriage, individualist feminism reduces to two key principles: women must retain full control of their own bodies; and, the state should have no dominion over private sexual arrangements.

Keywords: [“Women”,”Family”,”feminist”]
Source: http://www.wendymcelroy.com/sexcor/marr.html

JR Test Site News for 01-18-2018

The Case Against Sharing

With the rise of the “Sharing economy,” many have asked the same question, though perhaps not with the same excitement. This was Share, a conference meant to “Catalyze the sharing economy,” organized by sharing economy lobbying group Peers and capitalism-for-good boosters SOCAP, sponsored by Airbnb, Lyft, eBay, and attended by about 500 investors, entrepreneurs, and advocates. For the past few years, the “Sharing economy” has characterized itself as a revolution: Renting a room on Airbnb or catching an Uber is an act of civil disobedience in the service of a righteous return to human society’s true nature of trust and village-building that will save the planet and our souls. While San Francisco has recently cracked down on some particularly high-volume Airbnb renter-hosts, Chiu and other “Sharing” advocates are trying to pass legislation to make the practice legal. Across the U.S., high costs of living are driving more of the employed toward “Side hustles,” i.e. unprotected freelance work, the kind fostered by the sharing economy. The sharing economy’s success is inextricably tied to the economic recession, making new American poverty palatable. Sharing businesses aren’t just creating new income streams from nothing. Share represented the full gamut of a true sharing economy, from the controversial Lyfts and Airbnbs to the individuals who run home businesses knitting scarves and baking pies without traditional employment safety nets or the corporate muscle of Big Sharing. While the former wields the power to get its way, defining “The sharing economy” at the expense of workers and consumers, sole proprietors and nonprofit collectives are often the ones facing real legal problems that they can’t afford to solve. The benefits big disruptive “Sharing economy” players might be making for themselves are not exactly trickling down. For all its troubling externalities, the sharing economy is largely heralded as a “Return to the village,” an ahistoric utopia where we were friends with all of our trusted neighbors, lived in harmony with nature, and wanted not to consume, but to share. The sharing economy doesn’t build trust - it trades on cultural homogeneity and established social networks both online and in real life. Sharing economy boosters repeatedly call the whole thing “Empowering.” For them, it certainly is. In its full scope, including barter and gift transactions and nonprofit collectives and cooperatives, the sharing economy is decidedly not all bad. Enabling peer to peer commercial interactions can save us time and money; it can lessen our impact on the planet. In many ways, Share was an object lesson in self-delusion.

Keywords: [“Share”,”economy”,”work”]
Source: https://medium.com/the-nib/the-case-against-sharing-9ea5ba3d216d

David Rockefeller, billionaire philanthropist, dead at 101

David Rockefeller, the billionaire businessman and philanthropist who was the last in his generation of one of the country’s most famously philanthropic families, died Monday. To mark his 100th birthday in 2015, Rockefeller gave 1,000 acres of land next to a national park to the state of Maine. Aspects of the Rockefeller brothers’ upbringing became famous, including the 25-cent allowance, portions of which had to be set aside for charity and savings, and the inculcation that wealth brings great responsibility. Two of his brothers held elected office: Nelson Rockefeller served as the governor of New York, hungered for the White House and briefly served as vice president. David Rockefeller wielded power and influence without ever seeking public office. Unlike his other brothers, John D. III and Laurance, who shied from the spotlight and were known for philanthropy, David Rockefeller embraced business and traveled and spoke widely as a champion of enlightened capitalism. In his role of business statesman, Rockefeller preached capitalism at home and favored assisting economies abroad on grounds that bringing prosperity to the Third World would create customers for American products. As one of the Rockefeller grandchildren, David belonged to the last generation in which the inherited family billions were concentrated in a few hands. Under Rockefeller, Chase was the first U.S. bank to open offices in the Soviet Union and China and, in 1974, the first to open an office in Egypt after the Suez crisis of 1956. In his early travels to South Africa, Rockefeller arranged clandestine meetings with several underground black leaders. Rockefeller took a lot of heat for his bank’s substantial dealings with South Africa’s white separatist regime and for helping the deposed, terminally ill Shah of Iran come to New York for medical treatment in 1979, the move that triggered the 13-month U.S. embassy hostage crisis in Tehran. Rockefeller maintained the family’s patronage of the arts, including its long-standing relationship with New York’s Museum of Modern Art, of which his mother had been a fervent patron. The Rockefeller estate overlooking the Hudson River north of New York City is the repository of four generations of family history, including Nelson’s art and sculpture collection. One of the major efforts of Rockefeller’s later years was directed at restoring family influence in the landmark Rockefeller Center, most of which had been sold in the 1980s to Japanese investors. Rockefeller and his wife, the former Margaret McGrath, married in 1940 and had six children – David Jr., Richard, Abby, Neva, Margaret and Eileen.

Keywords: [“Rockefeller”,”family”,”office”]
Source: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/03/20/david-rockefeller-billionaire-philanthropist-dead-at-101.html

JR Test Site News for 01-17-2018

The Neuroscience Of Enlightenment

Mutualist Blog: Free Market Anti-Capitalism

The first feature, the free market itself-the maximum possible degree of economic freedom-is a goal for Graubart in it’s own right. Without a universal entitlement, a totally free and unregulated market will lead to barbarism through the concentration of capital, technological unemployment and mass impoverishment, and eventually class war and revolution. Graubart explains the basic principles in more detail with the acronym AFFEERCE, with AF standing forAlternative Family, FE for Free Enterprise, E for Entitlement, RC for Reproductive Control and E for Enlightenment. Personal entitlements include nutritious food, safe shelter, unlimited free education, and quality medical…. Reproductive Control – Families must pay the present value for a lifetime of entitlements before they are allowed to adopt or raise a child. Even this amount might be phased in over 100 or more years…. Regardless of cost, if the parents cannot pay, the child will be placed with a family that can afford the child…. Enlightenment – In a free society, all religions, spiritualties, beliefs or lack thereof, are welcome. A libertarian society in which the welfare state was replaced by a universal basic income funded by a tax on unearned wealth, the regulatory state was replaced with prohibitive taxes on emissions of CO2 and toxic chemicals, and the market was otherwise completely free, would at least be a huge step in the right direction. The Alternative Family, with its formal legal charter and bylaws, is the official building block of the AFFEERCE society, and all its members’ Entitlements are shared within the family unit as a condition of membership. The state and the large corporation exist for purposes that will be obsolete in a free society with cheap small-scale production technology, horizontal network communications and peer-to-peer organizations. The Universal Entitlement is necessary in a free market economy, Graubart says, because without it the natural trends of the free market will impoverish the great majority of the population and create an army of paupers ready to pull society down around their ears. Because of the entitlements, the division of labor and the economies of scale, every AFFEERCE family is free to form their own society. While it will never be the case, as it is today, where the lower 40% of the population has.2 percent of the wealth in a truly free society, there is a level of inequality that has been shown to favor optimal success in business, science and economics. “[y]ou might be surprised to find out that in a truly free society, many of the reasons to have children in pre-modern times will come back in a thoroughly modern context. First of all, his very model of a society in which households are polarized between comfortable, educated people who exercise restraint and uneducated, impoverished breeders desperate for the six hundred bucks each child would bring, presumes-as I’ve already discussed at considerable length-a society much like our own in many respects. I think it’s much more likely a free society would be characterized by a more nearly even distribution of wealth. For all my disagreements with this book, I do share one broad agreement with Graubart: the overall prosperity and happiness of a society in which subsistence no longer depends on one’s willingness to accept work on whatever degrading and exploitative terms it is offered, in which people are free to exercise their full creative faculties taking advantage of productive opportunities afforded through association with their family, friends, neighbors and equals, where the labor threshold for comfortable subsistence is low and leisure is plentiful, where everyone sits under their own fig tree and vine and none makes them afraid.

Keywords: [“society”,”Family”,”Graubart”]
Source: http://mutualist.blogspot.com

What combination of factors were necessary to begin the Industrial Revolution? B. The development of machines, including steam engines and the internal combustion engine, made it possible to exploit vast new resources of energy stored in fossil fuels, specifically coal and oil. Where did factories start, and where/how did the factory system spread? How did factories change the nature of labor itself? D. As the new methods of industrial production became more common in parts of northwestern Europe, they spread to other parts of Europe and the United States, Russia and Japan. E. The “Second industrial revolution” led to new methods in the production of steel, chemicals, electricity and precision machinery during the second half of the nineteenth century. II. New patterns of global trade and production developed and further integrated the global economy as industrialists sought raw materials and new markets for the increasing amount and array of goods produced in their factories. As industrial production rose, what type(s) of production declined? C. The rapid increases in productivity caused by industrial production encouraged industrialized states to seek out new consumer markets for their finished goods What “New” markets did industrialized states look/ create for their exports? D. The need for specialized and limited metals for industrial production, as well as the global demand for gold, silver and diamonds as forms of wealth led to the development of extensive mining centers. How did the Ind. Rev. affect social and demographic characteristics? A. New social classes, including the middle class and the industrial working class, developed. New ideas about nationalism, race, gender, class and culture also developed that both facilitated the spread of transoceanic empires and new states, as well as justifying anti-imperial resistance and the formation of new national identities. How did anti-imperialism affect the Ottoman Empire’s territories? D. New states developed on the edges of empire. Key Concept 5.3 Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform The eighteenth century marked the beginning of an intense period of revolution and rebellion against existing governments and the establishment of new nation-states around the world. These rebellions sometimes resulted in the formation of new states and stimulated the development of new ideologies. How did Enlightenment thinkers affect understandings of the relationship between the natural world and humans? B. Intellectuals critiqued the role that religion played in public life, insisting on the importance of reason as opposed to revelation How did the Enlightenment evaluate the role of religion in public life? C. Enlightenment thinkers developed new political ideas about the individual, natural rights and the social contract. What is the basis of national identity and nationalism? How did governments use these new ideas on their populations? III. Increasing discontent with imperial rule and the spread of Enlightenment ideas propelled reformist and revolutionary movements. How did imperial governments react to nationalistic rebellions? IV. The global spread of European political and social thought and the increasing number of rebellions stimulated new transnational ideologies and solidarities. B. The new global capitalist economy continued to rely on coerced and semi-coerced labor migration, including slavery, Chinese and Indian indentured servitude and convict labor. How were gender roles affected by migration? How did migrants preserve and transplant their culture in their new homes? How did receiving societies react to the new presence of foreign migrants? ..

Keywords: [“new”,”how”,”state”]
Source: http://meguerian.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Unit-5-Study-Guide-.pdf