J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 09-28-2018

Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business eBook: Blaine Bartlett, David Meltzer: Amazon.ca: Kindle Store

Product Description Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. From our perspective, business is nothing less than a spiritual discipline, it requires the same integrity, commitment, intentionality, courage, discipline, and compassion as any other spiritual discipline. 

It’s the honoring of this value-the ennobling of this value-that is called forth when we approach business as a spiritual undertaking. About the Author Blaine Bartlett is a thought leader, author, professor, and keynote speaker. Over a career spanning almost four decades he has had the opportunity to impact nearly a million individuals and has observed firsthand what business has done as well as recognizing what it is capable of providing. Blaine works internationally and regularly speaks to businesses, universities and global conferences on the future of business and leadership. Through his work and life he embodies the position that the future of business is making the future its business. 

David Meltzer is currently the CEO at Sports 1 Marketing, a global marketing agency he co-founded with Hall of Fame Quarterback Warren Moon. As a Forbes Top Ten Keynote speaker and best-selling author Dave combines situational knowledge from his career and life journey and speaks internationally to Fortune 500 companies and top business conferences, prestigious universities, and sports seminars. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”speaks”,”Sports”]
Source: https://www.amazon.ca/Compassionate-Capitalism-Journey-Soul-Business-ebook/dp/B01GOUOWFS

How to achieve a more compassionate capitalism: look back to medieval Cambridge

Legal advances created a lively property market; cutting-edge technologies improved water management and bridge-building; commodity trade expanded; and towns grew dramatically, both in number and size. Its focus was on local infrastructure and local wellbeing. City churches were financed by local people to meet the needs of local people. Their legacy remains with us today: the most valuable real estate in a modern city is often occupied by medieval churches and hospitals. Using recently discovered documents and novel statistical techniques, we have analysed the histories of over one thousand properties in medieval Cambridge over this period. 

Using evidence from the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279 – we show how wealth accumulated by successful businesses was recycled back into the community through support for local churches and hospitals and for itinerant preachers based in the town. Town government was devolved by the king and queen to the mayor and bailiffs, and they encouraged the development of guilds, which promoted cooperation. The business centre of Cambridge shifted south as the town expanded. ‘New wealth’ replaced ‘old wealth’ as a local commercial class replaced Norman aristocrats. Local pride and religious devotion – expressed through high levels of charitable giving – helped spread the economic benefits throughout the town community. This self-sustaining system was broken in the 1340s by the Black Death, the outbreak of the Hundred Years War and the punitive levels of taxation imposed on towns thereafter. 

When prosperity returned in the Tudor period, a more ruthless form of capitalism took root, and it is this ruthless form of capitalism whose legacy remains with us today. 

Keywords: [“local”,”town”,”Hospitals”]
Source: https://ehsthelongrun.net/2017/03/27/how-to-achieve-a-more-compassionate-capitalism-look-back-to-medieval-cambridge/

One Man’s Quest To Make Medical Technology Affordable To All

One Man’s Quest To Make Medical Technology Affordable To All : Shots – Health News David Green says capitalism practiced with empathy is the right way to make health care available to the masses. The social entrepreneur is working on medical devices and services that can make a difference in the developing world. David Green is a man on a mission to drive down the cost of medical devices and health services. I caught up with Green at a company he is launching in Chicago that’s taking on the high cost of hearing aids. He’s demonstrating how to program his company’s new hearing device on a cellphone. 

He has helped create Sound World Solutions to market a new high-quality hearing device developed by his partner, Stavros Basseas. My competitive juices get flowing when I start to think about a big, $4 billion medical device company and how I’m going to beat them. The device, which we reported on yesterday, will be sold in the U.S. But the main market will be in developing countries, where it will sell for a couple hundred dollars – a fraction of the cost of high-end hearing aids. Green says his strategy is to minimize the cost of technology, production and distribution so he can push prices to the lowest possible level and force other companies to compete. 

The most notable may be a company named Aurolab in India that manufactures intraocular lenses. Through Aurolab, Green helped drive down the price of the lenses from several hundred dollars apiece to $2 now. Green has also set up eye-care programs in countries from Nepal to Kenya, created less expensive testing for people with diabetes, and helped set up social investing funds. 

Keywords: [“hear”,”Green”,”company”]
Source: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2013/07/03/198065436/one-mans-quest-to-make-health-care-accessible-and-affordable

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-27-2018

Student To Pelosi: Young People Do Not Believe In Capitalism, Can We Fight Against “Right-Wing Economics?”

TREVOR HILL, NYU STUDENT: I was originally slated to give a pretty soft question, but given the dire circumstances – I’m so sorry Mr. [Jake] Tapper – given the dire circumstances our country is in, I wonder if you’d indulge me in a little bit more of a serious question about the future of the Democratic Party. What I’ve seen on NYU’s campus and what I’ve seen in polls all over – I mean, CNN even, a Harvard University poll last May showed that people between the ages of 18 and 29, not just Democrats, not just leftists, 51 percent of people between 18 and 29 no longer support the system of capitalism. Now, that’s not me asking you to make a radical statement about capitalism, but I’m just telling you that my experience is that the younger generation is moving left on economic issues and I’ve been so excited to see how Democrats have moved left on social issues. We do think that capitalism is not necessarily meeting the needs with the income inequality that we have in our country. About 40 years ago, a little bit more now, no less a person in terms of capitalism than the chairman of the Standard Oil of New Jersey said – he talked about stakeholder capitalism, capitalism that said when we make decisions as managements and CEOs of the country, we take into consideration our shareholders, our management, our workers, our customers, and the community at large. 

Around 20 years ago, it started to turn into – maybe 15, 20 years ago, it started to turn into shareholder capitalism, where we’re strictly talking about the quarterly report. So a CEO would make much more money by keeping pay low, even though productivity is rising, the worker is not getting any more pay, and the CEO is getting a big pay because he’s kept costs lows by depriving workers of their share of the productivity that they created. Disparity between the CEO and the worker in the shareholder capitalism is more like 350 to 400 to 1. The more money you put in the pocket of the worker for the productivity he or she has produced, the more money they will spend, consume with confidence, inject into the economy and grow the economy. So what you talked about and what you’ve talked about, the same thing, the stagnation of wages and the financial instability that families are feeling, tied with seeing priorities that are not necessarily ones that they have as – well, they care about it, but it’s not a job and being able to have a home and send your children to school and have a dignified retirement, or what we want for all Americans, and capitalism should serve that purpose. 

It’s a safety net for capitalism, because they can go through their cycles, and when they don’t need as many employees, they – we have unemployment insurance or all kinds of benefits as a safety net that enable them to go through cycles. I don’t think we have to change from capitalism. 

Keywords: [“more”,”capitalism”,”worker”]
Source: https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2017/01/31/student_to_pelosi_young_people_do_not_believe_in_capitalism_can_we_fight_against_right-wing_economics.html

In the ultimately his carpenter’s past two decades, he’s training proved useful. Helped restore sight to One day in epidemiology hundreds of thousands of class, Green heard a lecture individuals in countries by SPH alumnus Larry like India, Nepal, Egypt, Brilliant, chair of the Seva Tibet, El Salvador, TanFoundation, a nonprofit organzania, and Kenya, and he’s ization dedicated to finding now working to restore hearskillful means of relieving David Green ing to similar numbers of peosuffering worldwide. Next on the agenda, Green hopes promptly volunteered for the foundation to find new ways to make antiretroviral and after graduation joined its staff. Dugs available to AIDS patients-espeThrough Seva, he became involved in cially children-who can’t otherwise global efforts to make cataract surgery afford treatment. Available at low cost to patients in India Green, who lives in Berkeley, Caliand Nepal. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Thanks in part to his carpentry skills, Green figured out how to lower the cost of manufacturing the lenses so that Seva could help establish Aurolab, a nonprofit manufacturer of medical products in India. Aurolab produces products such as intraocular lenses and pharmaceuticals at prices that are affordable to the economies of developing countries-without infringing on intellectual property rights. Aurolab’s customers, who are for the most part programs serving the poor, are then able to offer medical products at graduated prices to people in need. The poorest recipients pay nothing, those who can afford the products pay part of the cost, and the rich pay well above cost. Through his own nonprofit, the Berkeley-based Project Impact, which he founded in 2000, Green has used the same formula to make high-tech hearing aids available at low cost to people throughout the world. 

Project Impact is dedicated to making medical technology and health care services accessible to everyone, especially to those living mostly in developing countries. More importantly the award will allow Green to further his efforts to improve lives around the world. 

Keywords: [“Green”,”health”,”more”]
Source: https://sph.umich.edu/findings/pdf/spr05_findings_green.pdf

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-05-2018

Compassionate capitalism is the most pragmatic one

Global efforts to make medical technology and healthcare services sustainable, affordable and accessible to all, particularly to the poorer two-thirds of humanity are desperately needed. David Green developed an economic paradigm that he calls humanized capitalism, which would make these healthcare products and services available and affordable to the poor. This paradigm uses production capacity and surplus revenue to serve all economic strata, rich and poor, in a way that is both financially self-sustaining for the company, and affordable to all members of society. In 1992 Green directed the establishment of Aurolab, a not-for-profit manufacturing facility in India. Aurolab is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of intraocular lenses, which are surgically implanted in the eye to replace the cloudy lens during cataract surgery. Green helped develop high-volume, quality eye-care programs that are affordable to the poor and self-sustainable, independent from user fees. Collaborating with several institutions, he helped create an ‘Eye Fund’ that provides fifteen million US dollars in affordable loan financing for sustainable eye care programs and a related 1.5 million US dollar capacity-building grant. At the same time, he works with the Pacific Vision Foundation to develop an eye hospital serving northern California where revenues from insured patients would cover costs for the uninsured, and collaborates with Grameen Health in Bangladesh to develop eye hospitals. Finally, he developed the social enterprise company, Quantum Catch, to develop affordable retinal imaging for eye disease detection and monitoring, and a non-invasive method for monitoring glucose levels for diabetics. Recently, he has focused on making good hearing affordable and accessible as a co-founder of Conversion Sound, which developed an affordable high-quality digital hearing device.

Keywords: [“affordable”,”Green”,”eye”]
Source: https://olbios.org/compassionate-capitalism-is-the-most-pragmatic-one

What is Communism?

As the world is now, communism will never work, and the beginning of world wide communism would have to be fitted to every area, but in time they all would work for a common goal and the science will move a lot faster than it does today. The closest thing a Communism would have to a government would be councils elected by the people, councils which would be kept under control by the people; they would have no real power or authority. Some people hate the rich and some cops hate rich people and they want communism. Communism can’t work because people have different talents and skills, thus people can’t all be equal, or classless. What about the 25,000 that were starved daily in the Ukraine under Stalin? A forced starvation where people were going insane and eating their own children! What is the matter with people in the world today? If you like communism so much don’t live in the US!”. Did you not read the article? It clearly stated that communism in practice is unfortunately not true to the pure definition of communism. What about the 25,000 that were starved daily in the Ukraine under Stalin? A forced starvation where people were going insane and eating their own children! What is the matter with people in the world today? If you like communism so much don’t live in the US! anon73339Post 39. What people need to understand is that there is idealistic communism, and then there is the reality: corrupt dictatorships posing as communism, which is in fact the opposite of the idealistic people’s rule. According the definition of communism by the man who coined the phrase, communism *is* stateless and classless. Most of people outside really scared of communism will go into the people mind and try to get rid of it. So the manifestation of communism in the Soviet Union is not “Communism” in the pure or political science sense of the term, right?

Keywords: [“communism”,”people”,”work”]
Source: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-communism.htm

THE RESOURCE BASED abundance ECONOMY

We need people in all categories to develop RBE. A main aim is to get this information out to people so the whole world can start to imagine and picture what a life in abundance without money can be like. “A resource-based economy is a society without money, barter or trade, with the awareness that Humanity is One family and where technology, science and spirituality is used to it’s fullest to develop and manage the planet’s resources to provide abundance for everyone in the most sustainable way.” Where did the money come from in the first place? In the beginning it was based on rare metals, like gold and silver, and because of it’s scarcity it could be used as means of trading, instead of cows, hens, corn and other rather-impractical-to-carry-around stuff. Since the world economy is based on scarcity, if there is too much money, they won’t be worth enough to pay for what we need, the resources. If there is an abundance of money for everyone there would be no value in the money. Growing the economy and “Printing” more money to pour into the system, so that banks can lend out more money, and companies can pay their debt, with more debt, with more money. Why would people want to do anything, if it wasn’t anything “In it for them”, like money? Well, I sit here now and write this, not because I earn any money on it, but because it gives me something else. A resource like oil is continually being pumped up because of the money it makes, instead of researching and developing new environmentally friendly energy, thus continuing to pollute the world. In a resource-based economy with no money, barter, exchange, borders or passports, there would be no reason to produce weapons to defend borders and kill people for property and profit. We could actually have a resource based gift economy today, if everyone simply stopped using money.

Keywords: [“money”,”need”,”world”]
Source: http://www.theresourcebasedeconomy.com/about

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Compassionate Capitalism: Serving the Poor Profitably with David Green

An Ypsilanti native who now lives in Berkeley with his family, David Green’s warm and approachable style made it easier to picture him as your friendly, lawn-mowing neighbor than a legendary social entrepreneur who has impacted the lives of millions. Green is best known for making healthcare affordable for the poor by significantly reducing the manufacturing costs of medical technologies. Green is an Ashoka Fellow and VP, a MacArthur Fellow, and a globally recognized leading social entrepreneur. Among those inspired by Green were several Erb students in attendance. Green’s work was key to the success of Aravind Eye Hospital in India. The hospital serves the poor by performing hundreds of thousands of cataract surgeries a year, the majority of which for free or at a very low cost, all the while maintaining financial sustainability. By targeting the problem areas along the supply chain, Green was able to reduce the prohibitive cost of the surgery technologies dramatically. An example: Green found a way to produce state-of-the-art surgery replacement lenses for under $10.00 a pair, instead of the previous $150.00. My in-a-nutshell attempt at defining Compassionate Capitalism based on Green’s enlightening talk: for-profit social enterprises with a low margin, high volume business model that seek to reduce manufacturing costs by maximizing production capacity, combined with a tier-pricing strategy to ensure affordability to the poor, while using surplus revenue to maintain financial sustainability and forming a lasting impact by “Tilting the industry competitive landscape”. Green has continued to use Compassionate Capitalism to change lives. Those are just a few examples; Green’s current project list was so incredulously long that jaws were dropping over the breakfast table. Green expressed that his competitive nature kept him going, and running and meditation also helped relieve some of the stress from juggling seven to eight startups simultaneously.

Keywords: [“Green”,”social”,”student”]
Source: https://erbsustainability.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/compassionate…

‘Compassionate capitalism will continue to flourish’

In his first book,A Better India: A Better World,Murthy,now chief mentor and chairman of the board at Infosys,outlines his journey as he created one of the biggest entrepreneurial successes in liberalised India. In Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech,he said a true democracy is where there is freedom of speech and expression,freedom of religion,freedom from want,and freedom from fear. Freedom from want is not there for a significant percentage of the population. If we look at the Rama Sene etc,we realise we don’t have freedom from fear. What is your current position?While I do appreciate the value of independents like Meera Sanyal,Captain Gopinath or Mallika Sarabhai,I still believe that a major transformation can only be brought about by a group of people who come together with a similar set of principles,similar set of values,fight the election,form the government and push those policies. Will we see a turn towards a middle path?Entrepreneurship,which is the bedrock of capitalism,will continue to receive attention,will flourish and will bring benefits to people. Believe that capitalism with moderation-or compassionate capitalism,which is all about capitalism of mind and socialism of the heart kind-of-stuff-will continue to flourish. In one of your talks you do mention that international trade can be key to addressing conflict issues. Second,I talked about ensuring that compassionate capitalism is adopted. Recent corporate events in India and abroad have vindicated the corporate governance values that you have espoused through the years. Are you satisfied with the spread of technology initiatives for e-governance and improvement of life?We have to realise that technology is about reducing cost,improving productivity,making life more comfortable-and who needs it more than the poor? So a country like India has to embrace technology more than the rich countries need to. Am involved quite a lot in Infosys in talking about the policies and strategies of Infosys.

Keywords: [“freedom”,”talks”,”people”]
Source: http://indianexpress.com/…/compassionate-capitalism-will-continue-to…

Capitalism Capitalism wikipedia, capitalism is an economic system and ideology based upon private ownership of the means of production and their operation for profit characteristics central to. Capitalism: definition, examples, pros, cons the balance, capitalism is an economic theory where production is privately owned and controlled by the laws of supply and demand. Capitalism entrepreneurship finance politics business, capitalismcom is the global hub for empowering entrepreneurs, encouraging limited government and educating capitalists on self reliance and business. Music and capitalism a history of the present, “taylors contribution is to see the questions surrounding music and capitalism through the lens of traditions of social theory that have been crowded out by adorno. What is capitalism? world socialist movement, the word capitalism is now quite commonly used to describe the social system in which we now live it is also often assumed that it has existed, if not forever, then. Capitalism definition of capitalism by the free dictionary, define capitalism capitalism synonyms, capitalism pronunciation, capitalism translation, english dictionary definition of capitalism n an economic system in which. Capitalism article about capitalism by the free dictionary, looking for capitalism? find out information about capitalism economic system based on private ownership of the means of production, in which personal profit can be. Capitalism huffpost, looking at social issues over the past 100 years gay marriage, universal health care, public education, the legalization of marijuana, etc it is clear to see. Capitalism investopedia, a definition of capitalism, describing its history, how it differs from socialism and the role governments play in a capitalist economy. Capitalism definition of capitalism by merriam webster, define capitalism: an economic system characterized by private or corporate ownership of capital goods, by investments – capitalism in a sentence.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”definition”,”system”]
Source: http://www.libertyfoundationgospelministries.org/p/e/…and-capitalism.pdf

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-01-2018

Socialism vs Capitalism vs Marxism vs yourownmadeup-ism

On top of this, I donate my own time to church/missions, and I fund-raise for & donate additional money every year to worldwide poverty relief. Compassion is a human emotion, far more important to me than econmoic issues… People who really want to change their world could find a way to make econmoic issue work in their favor. You talk about solving the debt of undeveloped countries. If we use real economic strategy to create sustainable economies for undeveloped countries, then we can give them even a little money, which they can use to get rid of that debt. It has been pointed out that while the developed world has insisted that Africa open its markets and eliminate public subsidies, this has been one-sided as the developed world has not opened its markets to agricultural goods from Africa nor has it eliminated agricultural subsidies. African leaders repeatedly request that the developed nations abolish the subsidies they provide their farmers and open their markets to African agricultural goods, if the West do…. -The developed nations would produce less food locally, therefore providing a larger export market for developing countries. Food prices would rise without the artificial subsidy and therefore would increase profits for food exports from the developing world. The developing nations could adopt a more balanced agriculture policy, producing food and grain for export; this would provide a surplus that would shield countries from famine. If it were not for the industry & wealth of the private sector, then charitable organizations would have no money/wealth to donate to poor people. By the way, can we please make a distinction between poor governments and poor people. I am all for people helping people by donating money, it’s what I think is right; but, I do not think that this discussion belongs in this thread. On the other hand, I don’t think it is right for governments to give money to other governments, those that would squander the money when it could better serve other people. Governments ultimately owe responsibility and compassion to its people, Capitalist or Communist… If you wanna save many lives you somethimes have to help those who seem like idiots who need education not help.

Keywords: [“developed”,”People”,”money”]
Source: http://www.expertfootball.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=17127&start=90

Understanding the debate around ‘compassionate capitalism’

NR Narayana Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. Since Sikka made his announcement on August 18, a wider debate has raged over whether a founder who has stepped down and is not a dominant shareholder, ought to indulge in the kind of public campaign that NRN mounted – rather than making an unambiguous choice between total detachment and committing himself to addressing Infy’s challenges as part of the board. The debate has also touched on issues of conformity to a company’s core cultural values and ethos. Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. Beginning 1994, Murthy’s ideal of the “Democratisation of wealth” saw practical manifestation in the granting of stock to company staff down to the level of drivers, and went on to contribute to a culture of donations from personal wealth by all the founders of the company. Compensation for the top deck has continued to soar higher above the company median in some of India’s celebrated private banks – at least one of which, interestingly, had an Infy-like culture of granting stock until some years ago. The National Stock Exchange of India Ltd was in a controversy regarding payouts to top executives. The counter-argument, of course, is that these practices are not illegal, and have the sanction of the board of directors and shareholders. In his annual letter to shareholders in 2006, Buffett made the point that compensation reform will only occur if the largest institutional shareholders demand a fresh look at the system. In India, the largest shareholder is LIC, which is owned by the government. Regulators in India have been careful not to intervene – even though the central bank has, in the past, shot down proposals from private and foreign banks to offer sign-on bonuses and parachutes designed to protect bosses who are fired. That’s the question shareholders – especially institutional shareholders – must put to those on the boards and the compensation and audit committees of many Indian firms.

Keywords: [“India”,”company”,”shareholder”]
Source: http://indianexpress.com/article/explained/understanding-the-debate…

Compassionate capitalism is the most pragmatic one

According to David Green, much of the world’s problems are due to a human artifice that creates economic paradigms favoring the concentration of wealth into the hands of the few. Global efforts to make medical technology and healthcare services sustainable, affordable and accessible to all, particularly to the poorer two-thirds of humanity are desperately needed. David Green developed an economic paradigm that he calls humanized capitalism, which would make these healthcare products and services available and affordable to the poor. This paradigm uses production capacity and surplus revenue to serve all economic strata, rich and poor, in a way that is both financially self-sustaining for the company, and affordable to all members of society. In 1992 Green directed the establishment of Aurolab, a not-for-profit manufacturing facility in India. Aurolab is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of intraocular lenses, which are surgically implanted in the eye to replace the cloudy lens during cataract surgery. In developing countries, Aurolab sells lenses for two to four US dollars; a price that helps countless patients that otherwise could never afford such treatment to preserve their sight and ability to work. Green helped develop high-volume, quality eye-care programs that are affordable to the poor and self-sustainable, independent from user fees. Collaborating with several institutions, he helped create an ‘Eye Fund’ that provides fifteen million US dollars in affordable loan financing for sustainable eye care programs and a related 1.5 million US dollar capacity-building grant. At the same time, he works with the Pacific Vision Foundation to develop an eye hospital serving northern California where revenues from insured patients would cover costs for the uninsured, and collaborates with Grameen Health in Bangladesh to develop eye hospitals. Finally, he developed the social enterprise company, Quantum Catch, to develop affordable retinal imaging for eye disease detection and monitoring, and a non-invasive method for monitoring glucose levels for diabetics. Recently, he has focused on making good hearing affordable and accessible as a co-founder of Conversion Sound, which developed an affordable high-quality digital hearing device.

Keywords: [“affordable”,”Green”,”eye”]
Source: http://olbios.org/compassionate-capitalism-is-the-most-pragmatic-one

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-01-2018

44 ALUMNI NETWORK FINDINGS MacArthur Foundation Recognizes Alum’s “Compassionate Capitalism” nning a MacArthur award can be myself, or is there something that I can a revelation, says David Green, MPH do for others that will be helpful? The ’82, who found out last September that more you do for others, the more joy he was a 2004 recipient of the prestiand happiness you experience,” he says. A native of Ypsilanti, “And my wife knows for sure that I’m Michigan, Green was a carpenter when a genius, whereas before she didn’t. ” he applied to the master’s program in Joking aside, Green says the health behavior and health education $500,000 award will enable him to at the School of Public Health in 1980. Helped restore sight to One day in epidemiology hundreds of thousands of class, Green heard a lecture individuals in countries by SPH alumnus Larry like India, Nepal, Egypt, Brilliant, chair of the Seva Tibet, El Salvador, TanFoundation, a nonprofit organzania, and Kenya, and he’s ization dedicated to finding now working to restore hearskillful means of relieving David Green ing to similar numbers of peosuffering worldwide. Available at low cost to patients in India Green, who lives in Berkeley, Caliand Nepal. Green came up with a more sus”I think that each one of us can, in tainable idea. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Thanks in part to his carpentry skills, Green figured out how to lower the cost of manufacturing the lenses so that Seva could help establish Aurolab, a nonprofit manufacturer of medical products in India. Through his own nonprofit, the Berkeley-based Project Impact, which he founded in 2000, Green has used the same formula to make high-tech hearing aids available at low cost to people throughout the world. The organization’s underlying principle, Green explains, is that “If we can bring down the cost of key medical technologies, then these programs can become marketdriven. It’s a public health mentality- leveraging small efforts into big effects.” His method is straightforward. More importantly the award will allow Green to further his efforts to improve lives around the world. “It’s more difficult for a social entrepreneur because we choose to feed many mouths.” But feeding many mouths is what David Green is all about. “The only thing that follows us is our good thoughts, our good words, our good actions or deeds.” In Green’s case, those deeds are many.

Keywords: [“Green”,”health”,”more”]
Source: https://sph.umich.edu/findings/pdf/spr05_findings_green.pdf

Don Surber: Trump vs. Obama, or capitalism vs. communism

The new plant will mean employment in Alabama until at least the middle of the century, creating 4,000 direct jobs and up to five times as many jobs for suppliers. On July 18, 2013, the city of Detroit filed for Chapter 9 protection in bankruptcy court – a record $20 billion, five times the previous record $4 billion filing by Jefferson County, Alabama, in 2011. The Obama administration compares the $50 billion in direct bailout funds with the price it will eventually be able to get for selling the GM stock it owns. The $6.7 billion loan to GM was just a tiny fraction of the money given to it. As TARP special inspector general Neil Barofsky explained, GM used “Other TARP money” to pay off the loan So what about President Obama’s boast in a White House speech in late April that the bailout “Saved probably a million jobs” and that “GM is now the number-one automaker again in the world”? The “Million jobs” contention is quite a stretch. You can reach a 400,000 total by assuming that all of GM’s jobs, as well as all the jobs of its parts suppliers and car dealers, would have been lost. Electing Donald Trump president changed the dynamic. Ford Motor Co. announced Tuesday it has scrubbed plans to build a new $1.6 billion assembly plant in Mexico, a project that had been spotlighted by then-candidate Donald Trump, especially after Ford said it would move small car production from the U.S. into that new factory. Hyundai Motor Co. and affiliate Kia Motors Corp. said they will spend $3.1 billion in the U.S. in the next five years, joining other vehicle manufacturers in announcing investment plans amid threats from President-elect Donald Trump of higher levies on auto imports from Mexico. The planned U.S. investment by South Korea’s two largest automakers is about 50 percent more than the $2.1 billion they spent in the previous five-year period, Hyundai Motor President Chung Jin-haeng told reporters in Seoul on Tuesday. “We expect a boost in the U.S. economy and increased demand for various models as President-elect Trump follows through on his promise to create one million jobs in five years,” Chung said. Companies are spending billions on bonuses, expanding benefits, and voluntarily raising minimum wages because they can keep 79 cents of every dollar they earn instead of only 65.

Keywords: [“billion”,”jobs”,”Trump”]
Source: http://donsurber.blogspot.com/2018/01/trump-vs-obama-or-capitalism-vs.html

Issues in anarchism

Proponents of anarchism, known as “Anarchists”, advocate stateless societies based on non-hierarchical voluntary associations. Anti-capitalism is considered a necessary element of anarchism by most anarchists, while anarcho-capitalists naturally disagree. Anarchists have often been portrayed as dangerous and violent, possibly due to a number of high-profile violent actions, including riots, assassinations, insurrections and terrorism committed by some anarchists as well as persistently negative media portrayals. During the 2014 Scottish independence referendum there was debate within anarchist circles about whether to take an abstentionist position, vote for independence or to vote to remain in the United Kingdom and anarchists rarely fitted into the easy binary of Yes/No voters of the referendum, with all seeking to go beyond the choices offered at the ballot box. Libertarian municipalist Murray Bookchin criticized individualist anarchists for opposing democracy and said “Majority rule” is consistent with anarchism, but he also preferred the term assembly rather than democracy. A common accusation against contemporary anarchists by radical, gender-critical and Marxist feminists is that contemporary anarchists largely espouse a view of gender that is postmodern, liberal and idealist or identitarian and rely on post-structuralist queer theory. Anarchist People of Color was created as a forum for non-Caucasian anarchists to express their thoughts about racial issues within the anarchist movement, particularly within the United States. Buddhist anarchism originated in the influential Chinese anarchist movement of the 1920s. Historically, anarchists considered themselves socialists and opposed to capitalism, thus anarcho-capitalism is considered by many anarchists today as not being true anarchism. Other anarchists and scholars regard anarchism as referring only to opposition to the non-privatisation of all aspects of the state and thus do consider anarcho-capitalism to be a form of anarchism. Individualist anarchist Benjamin Tucker defined anarchism as opposition to authority as follows “They found that they must turn either to the right or to the left, – follow either the path of Authority or the path of Liberty. As Peter Marshall notes in his history of anarchism, “few anarchists would accept the ‘anarcho-capitalists’ into the anarchist camp since they do not share a concern for economic equality and social justice.

Keywords: [“anarchist”,”Anarchism”,”state”]
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Issues_in_anarchism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-31-2018

Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship

Through “Compassionate capitalism”, David Green works to provide high-quality, affordable medical technology and healthcare to the poor. Background David Green has long been at the vanguard of global efforts to make medical technology and healthcare services sustainable, affordable and accessible to all, particularly to the poorer two-thirds of humanity. His most significant work is the development of an economic paradigm he calls “Humanized capitalism”, for making healthcare products and services available and affordable to the poor. This paradigm uses production capacity and surplus revenue to serve all economic strata, rich and poor, in a way that is both financially self-sustaining and affordable to all members of society. Aurolab is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of intraocular lenses, which are surgically implanted in the eye to replace the cloudy lens during cataract surgery. Green helped develop high-volume, quality eyecare programmes that are affordable to the poor and self-sustaining from user fees. Green replicated this cost recovery model in Nepal, Malawi, Egypt, Guatemala, El Salvador, Tibet, Tanzania and Kenya, and has assisted other institutions in providing sustainability planning services and training, such as the Al Noor Foundation in Egypt and the Lions Aravind Institute for Community Ophthalmology in India. He collaborated with the International Agency for Prevention of Blindness, Ashoka and Deutsche Bank to create an “Eye Fund” that provides US$ 15 million in affordable loan financing for sustainable eye care programmes and a related US$ 1.5 million capacity building grant fund. He co-founded the Oxford Lotus Health Fund, which will invest in making healthcare equitable and sustainable in developing countries, and is a vice-President of Ashoka, where he leads an initiative to make solar energy affordable to low income communities. He works with Pacific Vision Foundation to develop an eye hospital serving northern California where revenues from insured patients cover costs of the uninsured, and collaborates with Grameen Health in Bangladesh to develop eye hospitals. He developed the social enterprise company Quantum Catch to develop affordable retinal imaging for eye disease detection and monitoring, and a non-invasive method for monitoring glucose levels for diabetics. Recently he has focused on making good hearing affordable and accessible as a co-founder of Conversion Sound, which developed an affordable high-quality digital hearing device with a novel, “De-medicalized” way for hearing devices to be fitted by non-medical technicians or directly by the consumer.

Keywords: [“affordable”,”eye”,”Green”]
Source: http://www.schwabfound.org/content/david-green

Will Tuttle on Circles of Compassion: Connecting Issues of Justice

Few living vegans are as influential and as compelling as Dr. Will Tuttle. His book The World Peace Diet has been called one of the most important books of the 21st century, and many vegans and activists credit Will with sparking their initial shift to veganism. Now, he is assembling the works of 28 other authors for Circles of Compassion: Connecting Issues of Justice, due out this July from the innovative new company Vegan Publishers. “Too often, we fail to recognize how forms of violence and oppression are connected. If we’re able to see and understand these connections, we can better leverage our collective efforts to bring about positive transformative change. We’ve put together a book of essays from leading activists who work to end different forms of violence to help lead us to that path. The book could be the push that we need to break out of our confining delusions, to build bridges between movements, and to make the choices that will lead to a peaceful and just world for all.” What inspired you to put together Circles of Compassion: Connecting Issues of Justice? Is it unusual for you to be on the editorial side of a project rather than the side of the creator, composer, artist? Your work has always made the connection between eating and using animals and other social justice issues. Some work with social justice issues like racism, sexism, ableism, and heterosexism. Having an entire volume of diverse and highly knowledgeable voices all explicitly including this missing and essential perspective makes this book a gold mine, not just of important insights, but also of specific practices that can help build a new wave of social justice movements. The book is as critical to our understanding of the issues today as it was a decade ago. I became aware back in the late 1990s that an important book needed to be written so that our culture would have a new understanding that would create a proper foundation for peace, justice, freedom, and harmony in our world. The World Peace Diet emphasizes that veganism is a modern iteration of ahimsa, the ancient universal core of all spiritual teachings, and veganism’s founder, Donald Watson, spent his last days on Earth at the age of 95, back in 2005, reading The World Peace Diet, and told the people around him that this book contained what he was trying to convey in coining the word vegan. Its message will, I’m certain, continue to grow and spread, and this new book, Circles of Compassion, is a manifestation of this, bringing a whole chorus of voices to help proclaim and clarify this message for our time.

Keywords: [“book”,”Vegan”,”World”]
Source: http://thethinkingvegan.com/interviews/will-tuttle-circles-compassion…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Re: What is the most exciting development in the business world?

Compassionate Capitalism: Serving the Poor Profitably with David Green

An Ypsilanti native who now lives in Berkeley with his family, David Green’s warm and approachable style made it easier to picture him as your friendly, lawn-mowing neighbor than a legendary social entrepreneur who has impacted the lives of millions. Green is best known for making healthcare affordable for the poor by significantly reducing the manufacturing costs of medical technologies. Green is an Ashoka Fellow and VP, a MacArthur Fellow, and a globally recognized leading social entrepreneur. Among those inspired by Green were several Erb students in attendance. Green’s work was key to the success of Aravind Eye Hospital in India. The hospital serves the poor by performing hundreds of thousands of cataract surgeries a year, the majority of which for free or at a very low cost, all the while maintaining financial sustainability. By targeting the problem areas along the supply chain, Green was able to reduce the prohibitive cost of the surgery technologies dramatically. An example: Green found a way to produce state-of-the-art surgery replacement lenses for under $10.00 a pair, instead of the previous $150.00. My in-a-nutshell attempt at defining Compassionate Capitalism based on Green’s enlightening talk: for-profit social enterprises with a low margin, high volume business model that seek to reduce manufacturing costs by maximizing production capacity, combined with a tier-pricing strategy to ensure affordability to the poor, while using surplus revenue to maintain financial sustainability and forming a lasting impact by “Tilting the industry competitive landscape”. Green has continued to use Compassionate Capitalism to change lives. Those are just a few examples; Green’s current project list was so incredulously long that jaws were dropping over the breakfast table. Green expressed that his competitive nature kept him going, and running and meditation also helped relieve some of the stress from juggling seven to eight startups simultaneously.

Keywords: [“Green”,”social”,”student”]
Source: https://erbsustainability.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/compassionate-capitalism-serving-the-poor-profitably-with-david-green/

Learning to Give

The Giving Pledge is a moral pledge signed by billionaires, who commit to giving away more than half of their entire wealth to help address our most serious problems in society. Billionaires signing the Giving Pledge may donate to charities, private foundations, and philanthropic organizations of their choice. They pledge to give throughout their lifetimes and through their wills when they die. In 2010, Gates and Buffet established the Giving Pledge for billionaires as a platform for donating, learning, and inspiring generosity in others. The Giving Pledge hosted learning sessions for signers of the pledge to meet each other and learn from each other’s experiences with philanthropy. The Giving Pledge expanded internationally with billionaires from India and China joining the pledge as well as younger billionaires, including Sara Blankley, the founder of Spanx, Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO of Facebook and his wife, Priscilla Chan, and Joe Gebbia and Brian Chesky, the co-founders of AirBnB. Today, the estimated net worth of more 150 signers is $780 billion. Pledge: There many types of pledges, including moral pledges and legal pledges. The Giving Pledge uses moral pledges, like a promise made between friends. If a philanthropist agrees to give money to a non-profit school to build a playground, he or she signs a legal pledge to ensure that the school can pay the bank and builders the money that is required for construction. Compassionate Capitalism: Giving Pledge signer, Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, champions compassionate capitalism over philanthropy as a way of empowering poor people, which she believes is more effective than traditional forms of direct charitable aid. The Giving Pledge: The official website outlining the pledge and listing signers of the pledge. Global Philanthropy Forum: Organization promoting ideas associated with impact investment, compassionate capitalism and philanthropy among the signers of the Giving Pledge.

Keywords: [“Pledge”,”give”,”signs”]
Source: https://www.learningtogive.org/resources/giving-pledge

Capitalism With a Heart

They justify corporate philanthropy, like donating to the United Way, not because it’s virtuous but because it buys public good will and thus contributes to the company’s bottom line. To hard-core free-marketeers, the corporation’s only mission is to generate profits for shareholders. Mackey defines his company’s mission as improving the health and well-being of everyone on the planet. Before taking the company public, he told investors that he was going to devote 5 percent of the profits to philanthropy, so they can’t complain now that he’s robbing them. Nor can Google’s shareholders, because its founders also warned investors of their philanthropic plans. As Katie Hafner reported in The Times, they’ve given $1 billion in seed money to Google.org, and set up the philanthropy as a for-profit organization so it can work with venture capitalists, start companies and use any profits to finance further endeavors. It’s smart of Google’s founders to try using capitalist tools to save the planet; the market’s discipline should keep their philanthropy from backing too many lost causes. Still, whatever Google.org accomplishes, I’d bet that it will pale next to the social good accomplished by Google.com. The company’s founders may not have set out to help humanity with their search engine, but they have enriched countless lives by spreading ideas and connecting people. If you read Adam Smith’s famous passage about the invisible hand causing capitalists to unwittingly serve the public interest, you might conclude that Google’s founders are better off investing their time and money in improving their core business. As Smith wrote, “I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good.” If compassionate capitalism is a more appealing brand, if Google and Whole Foods are using philanthropy to strengthen the invisible hand, even Smith would say they’re doing good.

Keywords: [“company”,”founders”,”good”]
Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/16/opinion/16tierney.html

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-29-2018

Compassionate Capitalism-Part 1

Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship

Through “Compassionate capitalism”, David Green works to provide high-quality, affordable medical technology and healthcare to the poor. Background David Green has long been at the vanguard of global efforts to make medical technology and healthcare services sustainable, affordable and accessible to all, particularly to the poorer two-thirds of humanity. His most significant work is the development of an economic paradigm he calls “Humanized capitalism”, for making healthcare products and services available and affordable to the poor. This paradigm uses production capacity and surplus revenue to serve all economic strata, rich and poor, in a way that is both financially self-sustaining and affordable to all members of society. Aurolab is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of intraocular lenses, which are surgically implanted in the eye to replace the cloudy lens during cataract surgery. Green helped develop high-volume, quality eyecare programmes that are affordable to the poor and self-sustaining from user fees. Green replicated this cost recovery model in Nepal, Malawi, Egypt, Guatemala, El Salvador, Tibet, Tanzania and Kenya, and has assisted other institutions in providing sustainability planning services and training, such as the Al Noor Foundation in Egypt and the Lions Aravind Institute for Community Ophthalmology in India. He collaborated with the International Agency for Prevention of Blindness, Ashoka and Deutsche Bank to create an “Eye Fund” that provides US$ 15 million in affordable loan financing for sustainable eye care programmes and a related US$ 1.5 million capacity building grant fund. He co-founded the Oxford Lotus Health Fund, which will invest in making healthcare equitable and sustainable in developing countries, and is a vice-President of Ashoka, where he leads an initiative to make solar energy affordable to low income communities. He works with Pacific Vision Foundation to develop an eye hospital serving northern California where revenues from insured patients cover costs of the uninsured, and collaborates with Grameen Health in Bangladesh to develop eye hospitals. He developed the social enterprise company Quantum Catch to develop affordable retinal imaging for eye disease detection and monitoring, and a non-invasive method for monitoring glucose levels for diabetics. Recently he has focused on making good hearing affordable and accessible as a co-founder of Conversion Sound, which developed an affordable high-quality digital hearing device with a novel, “De-medicalized” way for hearing devices to be fitted by non-medical technicians or directly by the consumer.

Keywords: [“affordable”,”eye”,”Green”]
Source: http://www.schwabfound.org/content/david-green

Benioff: USA needs ‘compassionate capitalism’

Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, show here at the company’s Dreamforce conference last year, has rallied dozens of tech CEOs to oppose a religious freedom law in Indiana that they feel discriminates against gays and lesbians and hurts recruiting. “Just look at that,” Benioff, 50, tells USA TODAY, gesturing at the majestic view. Last week, Benioff led a group of tech CEOs in opposing Indiana’s new Religious Freedom Restoration Act on the grounds that it was both discriminatory toward gays and lesbians and harmful to business-recruiting efforts. As Republican Gov. Mike Pence struggled to tweak the bill’s language – supporters sought legal protection for business owners if they denied services to the LGBT community based on religious beliefs – Benioff urged his customers to avoid the state and offered relocation checks for employees. In a wide-ranging conversation that name-checks Neil Young, Jeb Bush and Larry Ellison, Benioff makes clear that he’s both inspired and shocked by how events have unfolded since his first incensed tweet on March 26.”We’ve been out there attracting attention and operating on a scale we’re not used to, and I have to say it’s not a comfortable feeling,” he says in a soft voice that belies his towering size. “In the future, before people do something like this, they’re going to have to look for the business community’s support,” says Benioff, leaning forward. He calls Benioff, who is 6-foot-5, “The tip of the spear who can rally his friends when he needs to. Marc has a big personality to match his physical presence, and he’s fundamentally trying to do good.” Stoppelman credits Benioff with persuading him to have Yelp adopt a version of Salesforce’s 1-1-1 giving strategy, where 1% of the company’s equity, product and employee time is donated to the local community. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and his wife, Lynne, have donated $200 million to a leading Bay Area children’s hospital, one of many such donations across a range of local agencies. Benioff goes on admiringly about Walmart CEO Doug McMillon, who is urging Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, to veto a law similar to Indiana’s, saying it “Undermines the spirit of inclusion.” Marc Benioff welcomes his friend musician Neil Young to Salesforce’s Dreamforce conference last year. A Salesforce pulpit will allow Benioff to spread his gospel well beyond the Bay Area.”Neil can inspire millions with his music, but here we managed to do that last week through, of all things, business,” he says, a hint of genuine surprise in his voice.

Keywords: [“Benioff”,”CEO”,”business”]
Source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/04/04/marc-benioff-indiana-religious-freedom-law-usa-today-exclusive-interview/25258395/