J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-12-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – by Sanjiv Mehta at the #India2022Exchange

Sage launches Sage Foundation to lead social philanthropy

Sage’s 2+2+2 community model sets benchmark for FTSE 100 companies. Sage today launches the Sage Foundation which sets the standard for Corporate Compassionate Capitalism around the world. Each of Sage’s 14,000 employees will be able to contribute five days per year in work time to volunteer with any non-profit organization they elect to support. The Sage Foundation will also give grants to create entrepreneurial opportunities for the young and disadvantaged within communities, as well as grants to match employee charitable donations and fundraising. The Sage Foundation has created a model of ‘2+2+2’: donating 2% of employee time each year, 2% of free cash flow* and 2 of Sage’s smart technology products for any charity, social enterprise or non-profit organization. 

This model demonstrates Sage’s commitment to philanthropic leadership in the FTSE 100. Driven by Sage’s ambition to connect its customers, colleagues and communities within an integrated model, the Sage Foundation will be open for business globally from 1st October 2015. With tens of thousands of non-profit organizations as existing Sage customers, the Sage Foundation will enhance Sage’s relationship with charity and social enterprise. Non-profit organizations will be able to apply for donated Sage One, Sage Life or X3 products, through the newly created Donation program. The Sage Foundation will benefit from Sage revenues from the non-profit sector; notionally ‘2%’ of free cash flow is equivalent to revenue gained from non-profit sector in FY2014. 

Sage has reimagined business and brings energy, experience and technology to inspire our customers to fulfil their dreams. Sage is a FTSE 100 company with 14,000 employees in 24 countries. 

Keywords: [“Sage”,”community”,”organization”]
Source: http://www.sage.com/company/news-and-events/2015/06/02/sage-launches-sage-foundation-to-lead-social-philanthropy

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. 

Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers. 

Keywords: [“work”,”Church”,”made”]
Source: https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

How Individuals and Corporations Participate 02/15 by Karen Rands

Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. 

From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives. 

Keywords: [“company”,”invest”,”Compassionate”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands/2018/02/15/compassionate-capitalism–how-individuals-and-corporations-participate

I am a “compassionate capitalist.”

The business teaches poor/middle class how to file taxes. It’s meant as a check against corporations and rich folks getting all the breaks. It’s to level the playing field to the common person. Other capitalists who’ve seen this business model are entering the market. It works! 

In year two, we get enough customers to keep the business afloat. We level the playing field against corporations! Success! Now, any labor simply must come from overseas, paying as close to nothing as I can manage. The tax code change is good sort of! 

I don’t need new customers; the new tax code means they all have to come back for re-education! So, it works! People buy just enough to pay lobbyists, pay new accountants, keep website running, expand. I’ve made the world a better place, no doubt! The playing field between common folk & corporations is more leveled than before, surely! 

Until the next year. My business is gone, so money I paid to lobbyists to keep tax code frozen has dried up. Similar services offering tax education also dry up. Corporations pay a vastly smaller percentage of taxes than common folk. 

Keywords: [“business”,”pay”,”tax”]
Source: https://medium.com/@RickPaulas/i-am-a-compassionate-capitalist-6b80e1d643c4

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Compassionate Exchange

START YOUR INTEGRAL LIFE “If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” Compassionate Exchange is a way to move freely through all perspectives available to you, instead of staying chronically identified with only one. In Compassionate Exchange, we dissolve the armor that builds up around this limited, survival-based orientation. We reverse the self’s usual orientation and breathe in suffering, and then breathe out the pleasurable release of suffering. Compassionate Exchange can be practiced for any length of time. Picture someone dear to you and breathe this person’s distress and suffering into your heart. As you exhale, breathe out the essence of freedom from suffering, and direct it towards this person. Each time you breathe in, take in the suffering and distress of more and more people. Each time you breathe out, breathe out the essence of release and freedom from suffering and direct it towards this larger group of people. Breathe out the essence of release and freedom from suffering, and direct it out towards all beings. Take in your own suffering and distress, and breathe out the essence of freedom of suffering, directing it towards yourself. As the final step in the practice of Compassionate Exchange, notice that you and all the people you have pictured and all the suffering and freedom from suffering are arising in the awareness that is witnessing all of this, and this is who you truly are.

Keywords: [“suffering”,”breathe”,”Practice”]
Source: https://integrallife.com/compassionate-exchange-2

Download and Read Compassionate Capitalism Compassionate Capitalism Come with us to read a new book that is coming recently. Yeah, this is a new coming book that many people really want to read will you be one of them? Of course, you should be. Hard will be felt when you have no ideas about what kind of book to read. Or sometimes, your reading material is not interesting enough. Lis m And why don’t try this book to read? compassionate capitalism is one of the most referred reading material for any levels. When you really want to seek for the new inspiring book to read and you don’t have any ideas at all, this following book can be taken. This is not complicated book, no complicated words to read, and any complicated theme and topics to understand. The book is very appreciated to be one of the most inspiring coming books this recently. Ca p ita What do you think of this book? Are you still confused with this book? When you are really interested to read based on the PDF of this book, you can see how the book will give you many things. It is not only about the how this book concern about, it is about what you can take from the book when you have read. Even that’s only for few pages it will help you to give additional inspirations. Te What about the way to get this book? So easy! compassionate capitalism is given for soft file of the book. When clicking you can find the book and concern with it. Now, your choice to pick this book to be yours is so simple.

Keywords: [“book”,”Read”,”Capitalism”]
Source: http://wewede.de/compassionate/capitalism/compassionate_capitalism.pdf

Compassion, the Antidote

Martin Doblmeier: During the Vietnam War your own people found themselves deeply divided. Thich Nhat Hanh: There was a lot of suffering and people found themselves in a situation where they had become enemies of each other. Nhat Hanh: Forgiveness will not be possible until compassion is born in our heart. In order to be compassionate, you have to understand why the other person has done that to you and your people. Doblmeier: In a practical way how can we enliven that understanding and compassion within our own communities and families? You say, “I listen to him only with one purpose, to give him a chance to empty his heart. I am doing charity work.” But compassion will protect you from anger, and that is why compassion is the antidote for anger. If you master the art of listening deeply and of compassion, you can open the heart of the other person. Nhat Hanh: An act of compassion always brings about transformation. You react with compassion, and sooner or later you see the transformation in the other person. You go home with the intention to help, with the intention to help not only innocent people, victims of violence, of injustice, but you have the intention to help those who have done injustice to other people. So not only did we help the people who wanted us to help, but we helped the people who didn’t want us to help. Nhat Hanh: During my absence about 35 million people were born in Vietnam, and most of the people of my generation have died.

Keywords: [“compassion”,”people”,”person”]
Source: http://www.filmsforaction.org/articles/compassion-the-antidote

Patterico’s Pontifications ยป There Is No Freedom Without Capitalism

This morning I said: without capitalism, there is no freedom. A couple of commenters took issue with that statement. Understanding the relationship of capitalism to freedom is fundamental to understanding why Obama’s handling of the economic crisis is such a disaster. Now that we’ve moved beyond the President firing corporate CEOs to Barney Frank seeking to set corporate salaries, we have to be crystal clear on this point. Too often a false contrast is made between the impersonal marketplace and the compassionate policies of various government programs. Both systems face the same scarcity of resources and both systems make choices within the constraints of that scarcity. The difference is that one system involves each individual making choices for himself or herself, while the other system involves a smaller number of people making choices for others. It may be fashionable for journalists to refer to “The whim of the marketplace,” as if that were something different from the desires of people, just as it was once fashionable to refer to “Production for use, rather than for profit” – as if profits could be made by producing things that people cannot use or do not want to use. The real contrast is between choices made by individuals for themselves and choices made for them by others who presume to define what these individuals “Really” need. Capitalism is each individual making choices for himself. Socialism is those who claim to know best, making your choices for you.

Keywords: [“choices”,”made”,”system”]
Source: http://patterico.com/2009/03/31/there-is-no-freedom-without-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

How to achieve a more compassionate capitalism: look back to medieval Cambridge

Legal advances created a lively property market; cutting-edge technologies improved water management and bridge-building; commodity trade expanded; and towns grew dramatically, both in number and size. Its focus was on local infrastructure and local wellbeing. City churches were financed by local people to meet the needs of local people. Their legacy remains with us today: the most valuable real estate in a modern city is often occupied by medieval churches and hospitals. Using recently discovered documents and novel statistical techniques, we have analysed the histories of over one thousand properties in medieval Cambridge over this period. Using evidence from the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279 – we show how wealth accumulated by successful businesses was recycled back into the community through support for local churches and hospitals and for itinerant preachers based in the town. Town government was devolved by the king and queen to the mayor and bailiffs, and they encouraged the development of guilds, which promoted cooperation. The business centre of Cambridge shifted south as the town expanded. ‘New wealth’ replaced ‘old wealth’ as a local commercial class replaced Norman aristocrats. Local pride and religious devotion – expressed through high levels of charitable giving – helped spread the economic benefits throughout the town community. This self-sustaining system was broken in the 1340s by the Black Death, the outbreak of the Hundred Years War and the punitive levels of taxation imposed on towns thereafter. When prosperity returned in the Tudor period, a more ruthless form of capitalism took root, and it is this ruthless form of capitalism whose legacy remains with us today.

Keywords: [“local”,”town”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://ehsthelongrun.net/2017/03/27/how-to-achieve-a-more…

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. “When we would go on home service and speak to churches, I would bring baskets and wall hangings and knit things that the ladies made,” she says. “I did really well at selling because I told them I know the people who made this-and it’s keeping their families alive.” In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers.

Keywords: [“work”,”made”,”Church”]
Source: http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

Could Capitalism Actually Breed Compassion?

We benefit from the compassion of capitalism and we must help others achieve the same blessings. Google defines compassion as “Sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.” How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. We must be able to have sympathy for and identify with the sufferings of others in order to solve problems and serve others. Sympathy and concern for others form the bedrock of free-market exchange. Entrepreneurs play a vital role in identifying the misfortunes of others, putting themselves in others’ shoes, to really experience what they are going through. In a free society, men like Henry Turkel can take their natural sympathies toward others and aid them in their misfortune. Through his profession, he had many occasions to understand the needs of infants and others who are incapacitated and cannot feed themselves. If not for Dr. Turkel’s sympathy, understanding of suffering, and the incentives to do something about it, my Bailey Grace may not be where she is today. This type of innovation, Turkel’s invention, is encouraged when one lives in a capitalist system, which can breed compassion even among the greedy and selfish. It does encourage ordinary people to unleash their God-given creativity to identify the sufferings of others and eliminate them.

Keywords: [“other”,”Turkel”,”suffering”]
Source: https://tifwe.org/could-capitalism-actually-breed-compassion

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw | Compassionate capitalism

The Ben & Jerry’s of Medieval Times

As trendy as this seems, the idea that business could have a social conscience actually has deep historical roots. In a recent paper, researchers in England found that medieval entrepreneurs used large portions of their profits to help their communities-embodying what the paper called “Compassionate capitalism.” Ilana Strauss: Compared to today, how did business owners in the Middle Ages use their profits differently? I used to work in a history department, and now I work in a business school, and people in business schools think that’s a really new thing, as though social responsibility just suddenly started yesterday. Actually, if you look back to the Middle Ages, what’s interesting is that philanthropy was just part and parcel of doing business. Medieval property speculators saw their business activities and their philanthropic activities as intermeshed. It’s not like today, where there’s this idea that a business has to tag on a strand of social responsibility. In the Middle Ages, it was seen as quite a positive thing to both be a success in your business and also a success in helping your community as a whole. As you get interested in making money from serving the monarchy, you want to spend your money and your profits from your wealth to build bigger houses and get grand estates. Casson: In the Middle Ages, the expectation was really that, if you were a successful trader and you made money, you should be willing to help others and put your time back into helping other people make money. In doing so, you keep your own business doing well because your business benefits if the whole town is doing well. The medieval economy was probably a more collaborative one than what we’re used to today.

Keywords: [“business”,”money”,”entrepreneurs”]
Source: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/08/compassionate-capitalism/536199/

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. “When we would go on home service and speak to churches, I would bring baskets and wall hangings and knit things that the ladies made,” she says. “I did really well at selling because I told them I know the people who made this-and it’s keeping their families alive.” In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers.

Keywords: [“work”,”made”,”Church”]
Source: http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

Compassionate Capitalism with Stephanie Tobor

My organization, Green Apple Supply, has truly been a labor of love. The organization is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and operates on narrow margins to make eco-products more competitive in the mainstream marketplace. We have also created Partner eStores, which offers nonprofit and for-profit organizations an additional mission-aligned revenue stream. Green Apple Supply is part of a larger movement toward “Compassionate Capitalism,” a model for both nonprofit and for-profit entities that prioritizes passion over profits in order to make a more just, socially-responsible economy the norm, rather than the alternative. I’m striving to make Green Apple Supply a case study for how the healthiest, most environmentally friendly products on the market can also be the most economical. Straddling the fence as both a funder and a nonprofit executive has increased my awareness of the gap between a nonprofit’s needs and the desires and expectations of the funding community. Communication and effective reporting are key to overcoming these differences, and both sides need to ask the tough questions that will ultimately make nonprofits better at what they do. I hope to use this experience to help nonprofits develop sound, sustainable business approaches and work with donors on strategic programming and funding opportunities. As I’ve grown Green Apple Supply, I’ve been profoundly inspired by the power of women’s networks. Stephanie Tobor has been a member of Rachel’s Network since 2013. She is the founder of Green Apple Supply, an executive advisor to the Plastic Pollution Coalition, and an avid supporter of Mission Blue, an ocean conservation initiative. Stephanie and her family live naturally in Evergreen, Colorado.

Keywords: [“nonprofit”,”Supply”,”Apple”]
Source: https://rachelsnetwork.org/compassionate-capitalism/