J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-24-2018

LSE Business Review – Compassionate capitalism: Lessons from medieval Cambridge

Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England when burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today! Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hot-spots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the Hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the Hospital. 

Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Compassionate capitalism involved high levels of charitable giving to hospitals, monasteries, churches and colleges which helped disseminate the economic benefits of the ‘winners’ of the commercial revolution. The post gives the views of its authors, not the position of LSE Business Review or the London School of Economics. 

She is a medieval historian by training and her publications include a co-authored book with Mark Casson on The Entrepreneur in History: From Medieval Merchant to Modern Business Leader – Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan – and articles in Urban History, Business History and the Economic History Review. John Lee is a Research Associate at the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of York. Katie Phillips is an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded PhD student in Medieval Studies at the University of Reading. 

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/businessreview/2017/06/05/compassionate-capitalism…

Capitalism, Corporatism, Free Markets

At some point, a collective decision was made that the unions should be given such expanded powers that they could destroy the company if they wanted. The union doesn’t profit from increasing profits and building a healthy company, it profits from building an overstaffed company that exists to benefit its employees. The union would have been better served if it divvied up the right to collect a union payout from GM among the workers of the time and let them sell the claims. What would have been much more honest and worked better would have been outright nationalization of GM when the rules were set up that the UAW could destroy the company. The toxin in this case may be a lot of things but it is an abomination to a free market, and it has destroyed the American auto industry. 

Far from vanishing, many of GM’s assets would be quickly purchased by competent foreign automakers eager to expand their capacity in what is the world’s largest auto market. Happily, the list of well-run car companies, from Toyota to Nissan to Porsche, is long. If GM is going to get federal money, it should go toward buyouts of long-term employees, and then let the market work to redeploy its assets toward more useful purposes than maintaining an expensive company-town welfare state, that makes cars on the side. Matt Welch says to the barricades to defend free markets. As Jonah says, markets are more than this information delivery system. 

Liberty demands property rights which demand free markets. In the fifties he tried door-to-door in Lansing after moving to Michigan with his upper Midwest bride, but when he got an offer at A.C. Spark Plug in her home town he took it, and settled into a middle-class lifestyle, during the best years of the company, in which he raised his family. 

Keywords: [“company”,”market”,”right”]
Source: http://www.transterrestrial.com/archives/2008/11/capitalism_corp.html

Get Ready: Pope’s Arrival Will Commence a Week of Trashing Capitalism

RUSH: The pope, Pope Francis, took off from Cuba within the last, what was it, half hour. What’s really remarkable is that Obama and Moochelle are going to be there to greet the pope as he descends the stairs. Thomas Sowell has a column today about the pope and his arrival, but primary it’s about the pope’s message. Of course the pope believes that we’ve all done a rotten, horrible job of it, and that governments need to get bigger and they need to become populated with more and more compassionate people to find ways to get rid of poverty. The message of this pope and every other leftist in the world is that prosperity is causing poverty. 

That’s why we need a great compassionate person like Obama or the pope to make sure that the pieces of the pie are not extraordinarily large for the undeserving and microscopically small for the truly deserving. He does not hold a single belief when it comes to such things as contraception, abortion, you name it, with the Catholic Church or with the pope. We’ve already read that Obama plans to hide the advancement of his agenda behind the pope. In the process make it look like this pope is abandoning his own church in favor of the liberal church. If the pope comes along and all of a sudden supports amnesty, which the pope is going to do. 

I’ll just tell you, I read that the church needs – it might have been the Washington Post or it might have been the New York Times, I forget the news publication it was, but it said that the church, the pope is interested in immigration and amnesty and immigrants because they need to fill the pews, just like the Democrats need voters. The reason the Catholic Church, the pope is supporting our amnesty, immigration, is a desire to restock, if you will, the pews. 

Keywords: [“pope”,”That's”,”Church”]
Source: https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2015/09/22/get_ready_pope_s…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-26-2018

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. While the operation of commodity markets and local trade during the commercial expansion of the 13th century has been explored by economic historians, the operation of the property market has been under-researched in comparison. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Properties were cleared and streets obliterated to create a new site for King’s College Chapel during the 1440s. Profits from property speculation benefitted individuals, family dynasties and the urban community as a whole.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Cambridge”]
Source: https://european.economicblogs.org/voxeu/2017/casson-lee-phillips…

Compassionate Jordan Peterson, David Henderson

I’ve watched the whole 30-minute interview of Canadian psychologist Jordan B. Peterson by the BBC’s Cathy Newman twice. When I showed it to a friend in Miami last week who knew nothing about him, we stopped after the 3-minute point because we found it so profound. Particularly moving were his words at the 1:57 point, when he says that many young men have heard almost no words of encouragement. My friend and I, who both went to the same therapist in the mid-1970s in Los Angeles, and who both went to a few of Nathaniel Branden’s weekend-long intensives in the late 1970s and early 1980s, appreciated that thought. Although it’s not true that I never heard words of encouragement, they were few and far between. Listening to this part the third time led me to think that Jordan Peterson is an incredibly compassionate man, especially toward younger men. I came to the same conclusion about Nathaniel Branden after going, at great expense and despite much skepticism, to my first Nathaniel Branden intensive in New York City in February 1978. In this audio, where I introduced Branden for a speech he gave at the Libertarian Party National Convention in Los Angeles in 1979, I talk about the moment during the weekend when I came to that conclusion. Postscript:I’m particularly interested in hearing from men about any memories you have of encouragement. Every few years at my cottage in Canada, we would overlap for a few days with my uncle from Texas and his family. In the summer of 1962, when I was 11, my uncle Elmer heard my brother Paul’s pet name for me: Henry. Uncle Elmer heard that and started calling me Patrick Henry.

Keywords: [“Branden”,”few”,”heard”]
Source: http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2018/03/compassionate_j.html

Capitalism and Socialism, their strengths and weaknesses – patriotmongoose

Strengths – supports private property rights, focuses more on the individual, less government control, etc. Eugene Krabbs, the owner of the Krusty Krab, sees this and panics that the Chum Bucket with its new hours will be getting more business than him. The same goes for the lie that H1B visas and the phony shortage of STEM workers. Of course, to keep the people in line, the business elites will bribe the government with company donations, lobbying, etc, to help them pass laws to beat out the competition, look the other way while they try their best to get rich at everyone else’s expense, etc. At any rate, the vice of capitalism is GREED. Socialism -. The virtues of Socialism are COMPASSION and COMMUNITY. Weaknesses – Unfortunately, the very means of achieving socialism are its greatest weaknesses. This system will claim that you didn’t earn your wealth, that you either inherited it or got it by jipping someone else and thus the government should take some of it and give it to more deserving people. The virtue of capitalism, diligence, is seen as a vice under socialism. In time, more and more people end up on the dole, others get angry and fights break out more as they feel they are working just to pay off loafers. Eventually, the society will devolve into something called communism where the government and its few connected companies that pay homage to it. Eventually the people that are working will get tired of paying for all those that are not. To keep the society from collapsing, the government, of course, steps in and tells everyone what they get paid, what job they do, etc.

Keywords: [“Company”,”more”,”work”]
Source: https://patriotmongoose.wordpress.com/2015/11/11/capitalism-and…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-15-2018

Is capitalism bad?

Capitalism itself is not bad, nor are all capitalist. People confuse capitalism with corporate America and do no consider the alternative socialism for what it is, fake. Jealously is the cause of people thinking capitalism is bad, not compassion. In fact people think they are better people just believing in anti-capitalism. If you think capitalism is wrong, live in a post-communist country for a few years. Capitalism has transformed the world I live in from poor to rich. Most people who make a lot of money give a lot to charity and are kind gentle people. Next time you ask the question is capitalism good or bad, consider the capitalist vs the large corporation. Consider Capitalism like we have in free America and the socialism that Poland or Russian had during communism. Is capitalism bad? No. Self expression does not sound too bad to me.

Keywords: [“People”,”Capitalism”,”capitalist”]
Source: http://political-economy.com/is-capitalism-bad

Self-righteous vs. Compassionate charity

It is important not to downplay charity regardless of the motivation. Typically:Self-righteous people give charity to make themselves sleep better at night. Compassionate people give charity to make the poor person sleep better at night. Don’t get me wrong, self-righteous people do accomplish a lot. The nature of self-righteousness is an important engine in getting good things done. Imagine corporations that sponsor cultural events or seasonal soup kitchens. Usually the nature of self-righteousness blinds the giver to understanding the truth and complexity of the recipient’s situation, whereas compassionate people are more likely to really put themselves into the recipient’s shoes and are thus enabled to think about fixing the problem rather than merely applying a band-aid.

Keywords: [“people”,”give”,”charity”]
Source: https://goodflagbetsy.wordpress.com/self-righteous-vs…

LSE Blogs

LSE’s public-facing blogs have grown into one of the world’s primary digital knowledge exchange platforms for academics, students, and researchers. Contributions from think tank researchers, politicians, and third-sector experts across the world mean that LSE Blogs have grown into a hub for evidence-based commentary and accessible summaries of academic research. At LSE we also use blogs as platforms for student engagement and teaching, where our teams are recognised for early adoption of digital platforms. More than 70,000 unique users read blog posts and commentary from across the LSE Blogs every week. Get started by exploring our new and most popular blogs below.

Keywords: [“blog”,”LSE”,”research”]
Source: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk

John Stossel on ObamaCare :: The Future of Capitalism

Obamacare has barely started taking effect, and the evidence is already rolling in. I hate to say we told them so, but … we told them so. The laws of economics have struck back….thanks to the compassionate Congress and president, parents of sick children will be saved from expensive insurance – by being unable to obtain any insurance! That’s how government compassion works.

Keywords: [“insurance”,”told”]
Source: https://www.futureofcapitalism.com/2010/10/john-stossel-on-obamacare

Food First

Informed by a vast network of activist-researchers, Food First’s analysis and educational resources support communities and social movements fighting for food justice and food sovereignty around the world. Food First gives you the tools to understand our global food system, and to build your local food movement from the ground up.

Keywords: [“Food”,”First”,”movement”]
Source: https://foodfirst.org

Animal Stories from all-creatures.org

Some of them are sad, some are funny, and some are both. Others tell of humans turning to God because of the death of a non-human animal. Others remind us of the individuality and sentience of every living being. One thing that all of these stories have in common is that they will touch your heart and soul.

Keywords: [“Others”]
Source: http://www.all-creatures.org/animal.html

Compassionate Capitalism by Blaine Bartlett on Prezi

Present RemotelyInvited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present. People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi accountThis link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation. Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article.

Keywords: [“Present”,”presentation”]
Source: https://prezi.com/h-ecl7tkwgxz/compassionate-capitalism

Compassion International

Compassion partners with churches to help them provide Bolivian children with the opportunity to rise above their circumstances and become all God has created them to be. Currently, more than 66,500 children participate in more than 200 child development centers.

Keywords: [“children”,”more”]
Source: https://www.compassion.com/about/where/bolivia.htm

FANDOM powered by Wikia

Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers. Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Keywords: [“Wikia”,”blocker”]
Source: http://socialism.wikia.com/wiki/Capitalism

Education, Networking, Events

We offer transformative thinking, programs, events, and a community of inquiry and learning. We foster aware and engaged business in Chicagoland and the Midwest through powerful programming, peer-to-peer learning, collaboration and conscious practice.

Keywords: [“programs”,”learning”]
Source: http://consciouscapitalismchicago.org

the vegan online store

Capitalism will cause harm to you and your neighbours. 10 paper stickers per pack.10.5 cm x 7.2 cm. These stickers are not printed at a random print shop – we get them from the radical left-wing print shop Disgusted Youth.

Keywords: [“print”,”shop”,”stickers”]
Source: https://www.rootsofcompassion.org/en/capitalism-at-work-sticker-10x

Compassionate capitalism: Lessons from medieval Cambridge

Compassionate capitalism: Lessons from medieval Cambridge. Idea of pursuing competitiveness while promoting the common good began as early as the medieval period, write Catherine Casson, Mark Casson, John Lee, and Katie Phillips.

Keywords: [“medieval”,”Casson”]
Source: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/80228

Web Development – DeepTown

DeepTown Company is good in development of Web and Hosted Solutions. CMS powered websites Cloud ready back-end solutions REST or RESTful API for Web services and Mobile apps Landing pages and single-page web applications.

Keywords: [“Web”,”Solutions”]
Source: https://deeptown.com/services/software-development/web

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-08-2018

The Library To The World

Download. Download Crossing the Line ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Draw 500 Things from Nature: A Sketchbook for Artists, Designers, and Doodlers ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The Gospel Songs Book ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Treehouse Chronicles: One Man’s Dream of Life Aloft ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Bus Operator 7E ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Colloquial Portuguese of Brazil ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Phantom Warriors 1: Bacchus ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download Love the Work You’re With: A Practical Guide to Finding New Joy and Productivity in Your Job ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The Advanced Pistol Marksmanship Manual ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below. Download. Download The MouseDriver Chronicles ebooks pdf are ready when you click and follow the link below.

Keywords: [“Download”,”pdf”,”access”]
Source: http://www.nasernobari.com/compassionate-capitalism-how-corporations-can…

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Profits from property speculation benefitted individuals, family dynasties and the urban community as a whole.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Cambridge”]
Source: https://voxeu.org/article/compassionate-capitalism-middle-ages

Confucian Capitalism?

After I introduce several important Confucian terms, I will attempt to illuminate where there may be contrast with contemporary Capitalist ideals, the reader may have already noticed where contrast is apparent between Capitalism and Confucianism. In so many cases, Capitalism is about profit seeking: Capitalism, it often seems, is about getting the most profit for the least amount of effort. In order to highlight this difference in ethic, I will revisit each of the six Confucian terms introduced and place them in light of Capitalism. Along the way, I will highlight how Capitalism would have to change in order to allow Confucianism to flourish. Perhaps, the harmonious society sought by Confucianism cannot exist with Capitalism in the mix. The result of following Capitalism is a completely different world view. In Capitalism, there appears to be a lack of moral servitude that is found in Confucian authoritative conduct. In order for Capitalism to exist in accordance with Xin, wealth needs to be distributed much more evenly throughout society. While Capitalism, in the form that it exists now, eventually leads to imperialism the goal of Capitalism could be set within limits to allow for a globally sustainable and morally virtuous world economy. By Confucian standards in fact, Capitalism is a path towar.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”Confucian”,”society”]
Source: https://justinphilcox.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/confucian-capitalism

Compassion Inc. by Gaurav Sinha

Be inspired to transform your business to change the world. In this book, Gaurav Sinha, world-class businessman and entrepreneur, founder of Insignia in 2003, outlines the economics of empathy for life and for business. He offers actionable solutions to maintaining a successful trade in a changing global landscape where conscience, ethics, and authenticity are high on the agenda. Incorporating Compassion – why good human values are the foundation for great business values. The Rise of Altruistic Aesthetes – Why consumers are willing to pay more for ethical brands than just affordable brands. The Principles of Edifying Essentialities – principles to build and nurture virtuous relationships between people, products and experiences, inspired by Buddhist teachings. Redefining ‘USPs’ – from Unique Selling Proposition to Universally Sustainable Principles; the importance of aligning business strategies with universally sustainable principles· RoE: Return on Empathy – How companies and individuals need to build a foundation that rises above profits to prosperity. Citizens of Compassion – Capturing the essence of empathy and ethics in life and business. The world is changing, perceptions are shifting, consumers are evolving, and this book will ensure your business keeps up.

Keywords: [“business”,”principles”,”world”]
Source: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/1116235/compassion-inc

Compassion Inc. by Gaurav Sinha on iBooks

Be inspired to transform your business to change the world. In this book, Gaurav Sinha, world-class businessman and entrepreneur, founder of Insignia in 2003, outlines the economics of empathy for life and for business. He offers actionable solutions to maintaining a successful trade in a changing global landscape where conscience, ethics, and authenticity are high on the agenda. Incorporating Compassion – why good human values are the foundation for great business values. The Rise of Altruistic Aesthetes – Why consumers are willing to pay more for ethical brands than just affordable brands. The Principles of Edifying Essentialities – principles to build and nurture virtuous relationships between people, products and experiences, inspired by Buddhist teachings. Redefining ‘USPs’ – from Unique Selling Proposition to Universally Sustainable Principles; the importance of aligning business strategies with universally sustainable principles. RoE: Return on Empathy – How companies and individuals need to build a foundation that rises above profits to prosperity. Citizens of Compassion – Capturing the essence of empathy and ethics in life and business. The world is changing, perceptions are shifting, consumers are evolving, and this book will ensure your business keeps up.

Keywords: [“business”,”principles”,”world”]
Source: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/compassion-inc/id1352169285?mt=11

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-04-2018

Compassionate Capitalism

Google has made it possible for anyone with an Android phone to call any phone number using Google Talk. If you have a cell phone from any one of the carriers, they provide airtime. As the years progressed, so did the lack of phone calls. So to look at a specific approach to this idea I call Compassionate Capitalism, there is one company that is very aware of it. Microsoft and their dominate Persecutory Capitalism doesn’t fit in any more. I heard a rumor that Google is building a free nationwide network which is strictly wireless internet. With a Droid phone, you can acquire this wireless network and make calls, surf the net, get texts, all that stufffor free. Cricket, might be the prime candidate for the air time while this wireless network is built. My understanding is that they built their own network. I going over to Cricket and enjoy the savings, strongly awaiting the Google Wireless Network.

Keywords: [“network”,”call”,”phone”]
Source: https://rjbresnik.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/compassionate-capitalism

Anger is Justified.

Of course we can rebuild the NHS in the image of market forces while asking it to cut costs, and of course that won’t affect standards of care. Of course we can cut funds that are vital for the poorest students to attend higher education, and of course that won’t affect social mobility. Of course we can cut certain child protection units, and of course that won’t affect prevention of abuse. Of course we can cut education, and of course that won’t affect our people. Of course we can cut frontline services, and of course that won’t affect their quality. Of course we can cut disability benefits, and of course that won’t affect the quality of life of those who aren’t conventionally able. Experts, who needs experts, we’re politicians! Of course we can gloss over the public’s concerns.

Keywords: [“course”,”affect”,”won't”]
Source: https://angerisjustified.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

Origin of the Spirit of Capitalism: Middle Ages Scholasticism, not Protestantism « Conservative Colloquium

In the lecture at the link below, Samuel Gregg, Director of Research at the Acton Institute, critiques Weber’s claim that Protestantism gave rise to the spirit of capitalism. He argues that medieval scholastics actually gave rise to the ideas that would form the foundation of the spirit of capitalism. Tagged: Catholicism and capitalism, Christianity and capitalism, free market, late scholastics, market, medieval capitalism, medieval capitalists, medieval scholastics, Middle Ages, origin of capitalism, origin of the idea of capitalism, origin of the spirit of capitalism, Spain, spirit of capitalism, Weber. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”medieval”,”spirit”]
Source: https://conservativecolloquium.wordpress.com/2008/03/31/origin-of…

Balancing Capitalism and Compassion

Distinguished experts Dr. Bruce Mizrach, Professor of Economics Rutgers University and Dr. Cathy O’Neil former hedge fund analyst and analyst for Risk Metrics, a blogger as Mathbabe and currently with Intent Media will take on the interesting issues involved in balancing capitalism and compassion. Free and Open to the Public, there will also be a discussion and open question and answer session. Wyckoff resident and NJPPN steering committee member,Dr. The program conducted by North Jersey Public Policy Network , a non-partisan,non-profit and 100% volunteer network that provides education programs on important societal issues and believes facts matter in obtaining the best solutions to public policy.

Keywords: [“Public”,”Network”,”Policy”]
Source: https://patch.com/…/paramus/ev–balancing-capitalism-and-compassion

Brief essays about a smaller, more compassionate version of capitalism

In the last few years, I’ve noticed a growing trend of fascination with the small. The family farm, the microbrewery, and the boutique craft store all represent our societies growing attraction to the idea of small and compassionate threads making up the fabric of our capitalist society. Its not really capitalism that we’re afraid of or opposed to – it’s mega capitalism – factory farms, banks to0 big to fail, superpacs, and big box stores that stir the exploited public towards frustration. So here I set out to compile a set of essays based on my observation of the growing trend of the public towards a smaller, more compassionate form of capitalism.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”small”,”growing”]
Source: https://smallcapitalism.wordpress.com

Hybrid Economics – The balance between capitalism and socialism

If you are an extreme capitalist, you’re probably wrong. If you are an extreme socialist, you’re probably wrong. The right answer lies somewhere in between these two extremes. Consider my widget company:In an extreme capitalism I can hire thieves to take my competitor’s truck fleet at night when he’s sleeping, or maybe just murder him outright to increase my profits. In an extreme socialism the government can tell me that they don’t approve of my widget business, or require me to operate my business according to their instructions. The right answer is to be able to pursue my own ideas the way that I want, but within the limits of civility.

Keywords: [“extreme”,”business”,”widget”]
Source: https://goodflagbetsy.wordpress.com/hybrid-economics-the-balance…

Narayana Murthy and Compassionate Capitalism

Narayana Murthy’s roles at Infosys Technologies-as a co-founder, longtime CEO, and nonexecutive chairman and chief mentor-has been marked by explosive growth, demanding management challenges, and widely lauded company leadership. Traces the development of Murthy as a child, scholar, businessman, and political and social activist. Traces the links between Murthy’s principles and the business practices that repeatedly brought Infosys Technologies recognition as one of India’s most admired and best managed companies. Raises questions in his mind about the place of philanthropic principles in the management of a business enterprise.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”philosophy”,”leadership”]
Source: https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/item.aspx?num=32597

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – What it Must Be

One ventures to define it as a way to reconcile one’s faith and conscience to the sometimes-unpleasant arena of business. While some enlightened executives have tried in good faith to give back to the faithful, most of the cogs in the wheel, big and small, are content to simply partake in the everyday business of corporate rapine without a second thought, nullifying any conscientious effort to give back. The problem is, most businesses haven’t developed a sense of compassion while IN business. As for business-to-business relations: Business needs to provide product, gain reasonable profit. Business must be good to employees, since employees = Man. Business develops new, tangible, practical products, which will truly help improve Man’s condition over the long run, make Man happy. Again, to reiterate: Compassionate Capitalism should be about being moral and considerate in business dealings, not just philantrophy or penance. All businesses, especially large corporations, must reevalute whether they are really helping customers when they house them; or if they are screwing them ten times over, by handing them a loan that they have no business handling. Compassionate Capitalism should be about realizing what is good for Man overall, not what should be good, because. Strive to do good business always, with my customers and competitors alike. To a certain extent, they are my partners in my business, and they are also representative of the community I serve. For my business is still dependent on the general welfare of my main customer, all of Humanity.

Keywords: [“business”,”give”,”businesses”]
Source: https://anabasius.wordpress.com/2009/05/11/compassionate…

Compassionate Capitalism In The Middle Ages: Profit And Philanthropy In Medieval Cambridge – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Profits from property speculation in the Middle Ages were re-invested into local communities. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Our analysis is based on over one thousand properties recorded in the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Statistical analysis of the levels of rent shows that messuages and shops were the most valuable properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: http://www.eurasiareview.com/08052017-compassionate-capitalism-in-the…

Compassionate Capitalism In The Middle Ages: Profit And Philanthropy In Medieval Cambridge – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Profits from property speculation in the Middle Ages were re-invested into local communities. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Our analysis is based on over one thousand properties recorded in the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Statistical analysis of the levels of rent shows that messuages and shops were the most valuable properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: https://www.eurasiareview.com/08052017-compassionate-capitalism-in…

The Capitalism Site

Rand’s description highlights the key aspects of capitalism on several different levels. Ethically, the moral base of capitalism is the principle that the individual has an inalienable right to their life, i.e., as a sovereign being. Politically, capitalism is a social system based on the principle of individual rights, i.e., freedom. It is to banish the initiation of physical force from all relationships that governments are instituted. Objective control highlights the essential characteristic of capitalism’s legal system. Legally, capitalism is a legal system of objectively defined laws based on individual rights, i.e., the rule of law as opposed to the “Rule of man”. Under such a legal system one is free to act so long as one does not violate the rights of others, i.e., the government is not a regulator but a referee. Economically, when such freedom under a “Rule of law” is applied to the sphere of production and trade, its result is the free-market. Under capitalism, there is a separation of economics and state, just like there is a separation of religion and state. A free-market is entirely dependent on a specific ethical, political, and legal foundation; without that foundation, it is only free in name. The goal of this site is to elaborate on the nature of this foundation and then to answer the errors behind the popular arguments against capitalism. When one does examine them one will find that the source of the error is the influence of one’s philosophy.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”system”,”i.e.”]
Source: http://capitalism.org/capitalism/what-is-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Why Intellectuals Hate Capitalism

“Intellectuals have always disdained commerce,” says Whole Foods Market co-founder John Mackey. They “Have always sided with the aristocrats to maintain a society where the businesspeople were kept down.” Having helped create the global grocery chain intellectuals arguably like best, Mackey has evolved into one of capitalism’s most persuasive champions, making the moral, practical, and even spiritual case that free exchange ennobles all who participate. A high-profile critic of the minimum wage, Obamacare, and the regulatory state, Mackey believes that free markets are the best way not only to raise living standards but to create meaning for individuals, communities, and society. Conscious Capitalism, the 2013 book he co-authored with Rajendra Sisodia, lays out a detailed vision for a post-industrial capitalism that addresses spiritual desire as much as physical need. Reason: You believe capitalism is not only the greatest wealth creator but helps poor people get rich. John Mackey: Intellectuals have always disdained commerce. You might say that capitalism was the first time that businesspeople caught a break. Mackey: It’s sort of where people stand in the social hierarchy. Mackey: I don’t know if it’s a psychological switch so much as that they weren’t necessarily grounded in the philosophy of capitalism. They’re attempting to not fall, so they try to rig the game, and we have crony capitalism. Mackey: The impetus behind so many of these types of regulations in the workplace is, in a sense, to shackle business again-to get it back under the control of the intellectuals. It’ll stifle the dynamic creative destruction of capitalism.

Keywords: [“Mackey”,”capitalism”,”Market”]
Source: http://reason.com/archives/2015/10/27/why-intellectuals-hate-capital

Libertarian Quotes

It is easy to be conspicuously “Compassionate” if others are being forced to pay the cost. I think that the people who are always attacking greed would be more consistent with their position if they refused their next salary increase. I don’t see even the most Left-Wing scholar in this country scornfully burning his salary check. In other words, “Greed” simply means that you are trying to relieve the nature given scarcity that man was born with. We haven’t of course reached that point yet; we haven’t reached the point where everybody is burning his salary increases, or salary checks in general. It is in war that the State really comes into its own: swelling in power, in number, in pride, in absolute dominion over the economy and the society. It is not the business of the law to make anyone good or reverent or moral or clean or upright. The great non sequitur committed by defenders of the State, is to leap from the necessity of society to the necessity of the State. ‘ But it is totally irresponsible to have a loud and vociferous opinion on economic subjects while remaining in this state of ignorance. Free-market capitalism is a network of free and voluntary exchanges in which producers work, produce, and exchange their products for the products of others through prices voluntarily arrived at. All of the services commonly thought to require the State – from the coining of money to police protection to the development of law in defense of the rights of person and property – can be and have been supplied far more efficiently and certainly more morally by private persons. The State is in no sense required by the nature of man; quite the contrary.

Keywords: [“State”,”salary”,”economic”]
Source: http://libertarianquotes.net/R/Murray-Rothbard.html

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. While the operation of commodity markets and local trade during the commercial expansion of the 13th century has been explored by economic historians, the operation of the property market has been under-researched in comparison. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Properties were cleared and streets obliterated to create a new site for King’s College Chapel during the 1440s. Profits from property speculation benefitted individuals, family dynasties and the urban community as a whole.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Cambridge”]
Source: http://voxeu.org/article/compassionate-capitalism-middle-ages

Marx and Engels: Scientific Socialism

In the 1840s, Engels and Marx concluded independently that the social order they were living in was doomed. Having served for a year as an officer in the Guards, his father sent him to work in the office of Erman and Engels in Manchester. On the way Engels and Marx met briefly for the first time – but did not like one another. Marx was editing articles about French socialism and communism but. In 1844 Marx lost his job as an editor and went to Paris to edit a journal and study economics and socialism. In Paris Marx received an article from Engels that he described as a work of genius. In Manchester Engels had gathered the materials for a book The Conditions of the Working Class in England, which he wrote after his return to Germany and published, in German, in 1845. In 1842, the year that Engels arrived, English workers, striking for the Charter, roamed the Midlands and North of England setting light to rich men’s houses and pulling out the plugs of factory boilers. Capitalism, Engels argued, was subject to periodic crises, and one of these would be the occasion for the working class wresting power from the capitalists and establishing a communist society. Engels and Marx believed passionately that scientific theory could transform the world if it was linked to the struggles of the working class. In France, a dictator was elected by the people in a popular election! Disappointed, but not defeated, Marx turned his attention to the economic analysis of the foundations of capitalism, and out of this developed his monumental work: Das Kapital. Economics for Marx and Engels was not just economics: it was the explanation for everything.

Keywords: [“work”,”Engels”,”Marx”]
Source: http://www.studymore.org.uk/she12.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Compassionate Capitalist Coffee Break: What’s the Deal with Investors?

Compassionate Capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and Philanthropy in Medieval Cambridge

Legal advances created a lively property market and commodity trade while improvements in water management and bridge-building aided transport and infrastructure. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. While the operation of commodity markets and local trade during the commercial expansion of the 13th century has been explored by economic historians, the operation of the property market has been under-researched in comparison. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches.

Keywords: [“property”,”market”,”shareholder”]
Source: https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2017/05/compassionate-capitalism-middle-ages-profit-philanthropy-medieval-cambridge.html

An Inconvenient Sequel Makes a Convenient Argument for Capitalism

When former US vice president Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth came out in 2006, it landed with a bang. This fallen world is the new setting for Gore’s follow-up film, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power. A white-haired, slightly more spacious Gore travels from the melting Greenland ice sheets to a flooded Miami Beach to demonstrate the impacts of climate change. In many ways, Gore makes the same pitch as he did in 2006. Leading up to Paris, Gore speaks with Indian officials about the possibility of signing on to a global pact to limit greenhouse gas emissions. You don’t fucking get it, the Indian officials effectively tell Gore. Gore then asks some friends, including Costa Rican UN official Christiana Figueres, what to do about this “Indian problem.” It appears that Gore believes that if people cared about the totality of global health-like, if they could see the Earth from a satellite view-the problem of climate change could be resolved. They’re trying to have a different conversation with Gore-one about the responsibilities of the most developed countries in the world, given their histories of colonization and disproportionate greenhouse gas production-and it is Gore who is missing the point. Gore has a eureka moment and rings up the Indian minister of energy with a plan. We watched as Gore made his big pitch, haltingly reading the description of SolarCity’s solar panel technology to the Indian minister of energy from a computer screen. In the film, an Indian official back-pats Gore and tells him his deal contributed big time. Thus, Gore makes an argument in an Inconvenient Sequel that capitalism can conveniently help solve the global climate crisis as long as we all see the bigger picture.

Keywords: [“Gore”,”climate”,”Indian”]
Source: https://www.thestranger.com/film/2017/08/02/25321740/an-inconvenient-sequel-makes-a-convenient-argument-for-capitalism

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. While the operation of commodity markets and local trade during the commercial expansion of the 13th century has been explored by economic historians, the operation of the property market has been under-researched in comparison. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Properties were cleared and streets obliterated to create a new site for King’s College Chapel during the 1440s. Profits from property speculation benefitted individuals, family dynasties and the urban community as a whole.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Cambridge”]
Source: https://voxeu.org/article/compassionate-capitalism-middle-ages

Capitalist or Communist?

What is Judaism’s economic system? Is there one? I would describe it as “Capitalism with a conscience.” In promoting free enterprise, the Torah. It is a conditional capitalism, and certainly a compassionate capitalism. Winston Churchill once said, “The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings. The inherent vice of communism is the equal sharing of miseries.” So Judaism introduced an open market system, where the sharing of blessings was not left to chance or wishful thinking, but was made mandatory. The Sabbatical year, was designed to allow the land to rest and regenerate. Six years the land would be worked, but in the seventh year it would rest and lie fallow. The agricultural cycle in the Holy Land imposed strict rules and regulations on the owner of the land. The landowner, in his own land, would have no more right than the stranger. For six years you own the property, but in the seventh you enjoy no special claims. The ten percent tithes, as well as the obligation to leave to the poor the unharvested corners of one’s field, the gleanings, and the forgotten sheaves are all part of the system of compassionate capitalism. G‑d bestows His blessings upon us, but clearly, the deal is that we must share. The Sabbatical year is one of many checks and balances that keep our capitalism kosher. May you make lots of money, and encourage G‑d to keep showering you with His blessings by sharing it generously with others.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”land”]
Source: http://www.chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/279679/jewish/Capitalist-or-Communist.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Amway Founders Heritage & Values: Compassionate Capitalism

Read This Before You Ever Debate “Capitalism” Again

Capitalism is only the private ownership of the means of production. The simplicity of this definition has given rise to several “Modifier” capitalisms: anarcho-capitalism, compassionate capitalism, crony capitalism, and free market capitalism. A more appealing form of capitalism is compassionate capitalism. Although there is no precise definition of this type of capitalism, the main idea is that, while its proponents like capitalism, they think it can lead to unpleasant excesses. On the left, advocates of a compassionate capitalism grudgingly accept capitalism as necessary and useful. The outcome of both the public-private partnerships of the Bush administration and the social consciousness and corporate responsibility of the Clinton and Obama administrations has been what people are increasingly calling “Crony capitalism.” Under crony capitalism, private owners of the means of production use the coercive power of government to advance their own interests. Another effect of crony capitalism has been the increasing power of the Washington bureaucracy to direct economic activity-undermining capitalism itself. Bringing the simple definition of capitalism into a debate is not enough. I’ve briefly presented anarcho-capitalism, compassionate capitalism, and the resulting crony capitalism. Let me now describe the kind of capitalism I advocate: free market capitalism. Free market capitalism means you should be free to pursue what you believe is good, whether that is building low-income housing, brewing beer in your barn, creating a business, or pursuing a profession. Second, free market capitalism fosters personal responsibility and human dignity.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”capitalist”,”market”]
Source: https://home.isi.org/read-you-ever-debate-capitalism-again

Thoughts on Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility from Vedic Literature

In this paper an attempt has been made to draw attention to the concepts of Business ethics and social responsibility as expounded in Hindu epics like the Ramayana, Mahabharata and Vedic literature and understand their relevance in the modern context. A review of literature on Corporate Social Responsibility makes it evident that most economists, management experts and businessmen do not endorse Milton Friedman’s views on CSR. Amidst different perspectives on CSR, the thoughts of vedic literature on the subject are very rich and refreshing. The karma theory cautions the corporate that they ought to be accountable for their actions. The theory of dharma counsels that businesses need to exist in harmony at four levels: universal, human, society and individual. The responsibility of business on maintaining and restoring ecological balance supersedes other groups because it is the largest consumer of natural resources and the greatest polluter of the environment. That Business firms should learn to live in harmony with all creation needs no emphasis. In accordance to the human dharma corporate tycoons like Bill Gates who pursued profits in the initial stage of business pursued objectives like charity and welfare with maturity. We also find that many successful business promoters in their mature years identify successors for their business and assume an advisory role. On a similar note the paper also elaborates how the principles expounded in social dharma and swadharma are equally relevant to the Business community. To sum up our Vedic literature calls for a spiritual approach by businesses that requires introspection and inner purification.

Keywords: [“Business”,”literature”,”Vedic”]
Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212567114001713

CK Companies Compassionate Capitalism

While Business must Produce a Profit to be Successful, I feel that it should have an Ultimate Goal to Enrich its Customers, its Employees and the Environment, while Enhancing its Investors’ Interests. To accomplish this ambitious goal, a company must first have a product that delivers true health benefits. Great Companies do not simply provide Great Products. With a Vision for Innovation and the Courage to risk failure, Great Companies develop Products that solve seemingly insoluble problems. Great Companies possess a Purpose that is larger than the Company or its Products. The best way to maximize profits over the long-term life of a company is NOT to make profits the primary goal of that business. Too many businesses focus on maximizing profits while neglecting all who are affected by that business – customers, employees, the community, vendors and other business partners. CK Companies and its Family of Companies are absolutely dedicated to delivering a product that goes beyond customer expectations – a product that improves health and wellness for all. CK Companies is committed to creating a “Circle of Life” where customers, team members, investors, the community, suppliers, business partners each Achieve and Receive life-altering benefits from the company and its products. CK Companies Team Members are valued for their talents and their ability to create success for the company. Customers are respected for their intelligence and their right to purchase products of value and integrity. Creating this “Circle of Life” where all are impacted by positive experiences and results from our company is the Win-Win-Win that makes it all worthwhile.

Keywords: [“company”,”product”,”Profit”]
Source: http://www.ckcompanies.com/compassionate-capitalism.html

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. While the operation of commodity markets and local trade during the commercial expansion of the 13th century has been explored by economic historians, the operation of the property market has been under-researched in comparison. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Properties were cleared and streets obliterated to create a new site for King’s College Chapel during the 1440s. Profits from property speculation benefitted individuals, family dynasties and the urban community as a whole.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Cambridge”]
Source: http://voxeu.org/article/compassionate-capitalism-middle-ages

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 01-30-2018

Richard DeVos’s Top 10 Rules For Success

LSE Business Review – Compassionate capitalism: Lessons from medieval Cambridge

Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Property markets developed in medieval England when burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today! Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Property hot-spots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the Hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the Hospital. Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279. Profits from the property market were recycled back into the community through donations to religious houses, hospitals and churches. Compassionate capitalism involved high levels of charitable giving to hospitals, monasteries, churches and colleges which helped disseminate the economic benefits of the ‘winners’ of the commercial revolution. The post gives the views of its authors, not the position of LSE Business Review or the London School of Economics. She is a medieval historian by training and her publications include a co-authored book with Mark Casson on The Entrepreneur in History: From Medieval Merchant to Modern Business Leader – Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan – and articles in Urban History, Business History and the Economic History Review. John Lee is a Research Associate at the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of York. Katie Phillips is an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded PhD student in Medieval Studies at the University of Reading.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/businessreview/2017/06/05/compassionate-capitalism-lessons-from-medieval-cambridge/

Microcredit: Solution to Poverty or False “Compassionate Capitalism?”

AMY GOODMAN: As we continue with the issue of microcredit, poverty and globalization, we’re talking to Susan Davis, and also Dr. Vandana Shiva, world-renowned environmental leader, physicist and ecologist, joins us, founded Navdanya, “Nine seeds,” a movement promoting diversity and use of native seeds. I would only say, let us not think this is a solution to every situation that creates poverty. It needs a solution in terms of respecting the land rights of the peasants and not treating land of the poor as something that can be grabbed by the rich. The second thing, I think, that’s very critical is, at least in India, we have witnessed how microcredit is being used to turn autonomous producers, sovereign producers into consumers. That’s why credit should be a basic human right, because through that they can access many other of their other rights. In Earth Democracy, that’s what I’ve talked about-the instruments necessary to defend the rights to water as a common resource. Privatization of water leading to a high cost of water could be financed by flows of credit, but the solution to access to water is rights to water. Rights need to be recognized as rights and collective rights to the common wealth of this planet – the atmosphere, the water, the seeds, the biodiversity. Credit can come after that rights solution has been offered. I think rights are only real when people can exercise their rights. I think you would agree that organizing people so that they can promote their own collective interest is the way to actually realize the rights that may be on the books, de jure, but are never going to be enforced, de facto, unless people have some means of power. It’s like capital is oil to the engine, right? So that’s why we’re saying if poverty is a disease, then microfinance is a good vaccine.

Keywords: [“right”,”think”,”seeds”]
Source: https://www.democracynow.org/2006/12/13/microcredit_solution_to_poverty_or_false

Plugged in: Compassionate capitalism at Timberland

A new ‘nutritional’ label on shoe boxes makes a point – but will it make the company money? Timberland, a $1.5 billion a year New Hampshire-based maker of boots, apparel and accessories, has practiced its unique brand of compassionate capitalism for years. The company monitors its suppliers to try to make sure they treat their workers fairly. Timberland’s bottom line looks healthy, too: Sales have been growing by an average of about 10 percent a year and, in the last three years, the company’s stock price has doubled, easily outperforming the S&P 500 Index. Last fall, for example, the company tackled the problem of genocide in Sudan in partnership with the actor Don Cheadle, who starred in the movie Hotel Rwanda and has become an anti-genocide activist. The company designed a limited-edition Timberland boot with the message “Not on My Watch,” and it sells boot tags and T-shirts with a map of Africa and the words “Save Darfur” imprinted on the back. The label, which looks like the government-mandated ingredients labels on food, provides information on where the shoes or boots were made, how much energy was consumed to produce them and how much renewable energy the company uses. Inside the box, the company calls upon its customers to take actions to help protect the environment or volunteer in their community. One of Swartz’s goals is to get other companies, including his competitors, to become more transparent about how and where their stuff is made. Timberland’s employees care a lot about what the company stands for, and a big part of Swartz’s job is engaging and motivating his people. I’ve talked to many of them, and they like being part of a company that stands for something. Now a message about the company’s values will be plastered on about 30 million shoeboxes a year.

Keywords: [“company”,”Timberland”,”label”]
Source: http://money.cnn.com/2006/02/07/news/international/pluggedin_fortune/index.htm