J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 10-07-2018

Living Life As A Compassionate Capitalist | Americas Greatest Motivators Keynote

Investment >Innovation>Jobs = Compassionate Capitalism

I renamed my podcast radio show the Compassionate Capitalist Radio Show after the Great Recession in an attempt to plant the seed that all the money needed to grow our economy and create jobs was sitting on the sidelines. So when you take the passion of an entrepreneur and mash it up with the capitalist desires of an investor – you get Compassionate Capitalism. Unlike pure capitalism, compassionate capitalism isn’t just about making money, it is about making money with the purpose of bringing innovation to the market and creating jobs, leading to the wealth triggered when that business continues to a successful exit. Here’s the thing—In America, Compassionate Capitalism has been going on for a long time. Since Angel Investing was first coined as a description of those that invest in private endeavors, with the goal for the company to grow big, go public, and reap the returns on that investment, it has been the game the rich play to get richer. 

Even when there was the dot.com collapse of the market….the angel investors had already made their big return on their money before the stocks collapsed on the stock market. Even with bombs like SnapChat IPO – the Angel Investors and Venture Capitalists make big multiples on their money, as the stock collapsed and those investors that got in on it when it first went public, lost a bunch. Without getting into all the rules covering this new era, lets just say — Anyone can get richer by investing in the entrepreneurial dream…. You don’t have to be an entrepreneur if you can invest in one. Angel Investors that people hear about making a lot of money from investing in Google, Facebook, Uber, or whatever is hot today, didn’t do it alone, and rarely just got lucky on making that great investment as their only investment. 

The problem is that 90% of the people that could qualify to be an angel investor are either too busy with running their own company or in their executive position to commit the time the traditional angel groups require or they are geographically located not near an established angel group. A way to get the primer for angel investing and jump-start getting started identifying and vetting deals to find the ones that are right for your capacity to invest and your risk tolerance. It is my, the author’s, investment in YOU the future Compassionate Capitalist. 

Keywords: [“Compassionate”,”Angel”,”money”]
Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/investment-innovationjobs-compassionate-capitalism-karen-rands

Beyond Kinder, Gentler Capitalism

The vast majority of the population is responsible for the creation of that wealth through work. The problem is one of distribution: resources are concentrated in the hands of a few economic elites, instead of being shared among the workers whose labor created it. CEOs at major US firms make over three hundred times what the typical worker does. Meanwhile American workers’ pay stagnates, the cost of living skyrockets, and the dwindling social safety net functions less as the guaranteed foundation of a good life than as a public subsidy for capitalists who refuse to pay their workers a living wage. You’ve got one guy, Jeff Bezos of Amazon, his wealth is increasing every single day by $250 million, but he pays many of his workers wages that are so low than many of them are on food stamps or on Medicaid. 

It’s what capitalism trends toward, even when we try our best to contain it. To survive, workers are compelled to compete with other workers to sell their labor on the open market, prompting a race to the bottom. In order for their enterprises to stay afloat and to keep from becoming workers themselves, bosses are forced to compete with other bosses to maximize profit, which requires them to squeeze as much labor from workers for as little cost as possible, while also pressuring the state to deregulate industry, cut taxes, and so on. The wealth bosses were accruing during that period still made them much more powerful than workers. Saving capitalism is a heavy lift, and an end to inequality and class conflict under capitalism is structurally impossible. 

If we’re going to invest in an ambitious political project, we’re better off setting our sights on a horizon beyond capitalism and on a new economic order, one that’s oriented around public well-being instead of private profits. At its core, it involves recognizing that the resources for a beautiful and fair world already exist – thanks to the labor of workers – and that those resources should be spent enriching the lives of the many instead of the elite few. 

Keywords: [“work”,”capitalism”,”wealth”]
Source: https://www.jacobinmag.com/2018/08/capitalism-inequality-worker-control-elizabeth-warren

Infosys salary row: Narayana Murthy’s single-minded focus on compassionate capitalism is commendable

It’s easy to look at Narayana Murthy’s open letter on executive compensation as the first salvo of the second round between the Infosys veteran and current management led by Vishal Sikka. Murthy addressed the letter to select Alpha journalists who never miss an opportunity and made his instructions clear. It’s easier still to be deliberately mischievous and see Murthy’s sharp words singling out Chief Operating Officer Pravin Rao as an expression of discomfort of the changing internal dynamics at Infosys. Rao was Murthy’s protégé, and probably still is; a fact Murthy explicitly brings out. At the risk of paraphrasing Murthy’s core thoughts, the veteran’s letter is more about the specific nature and character of capitalism that India needs to nurture for future generations, rather than about boardroom wars. 

In the Indian corporate landscape, Murthy is a rare titan whose rootedness to values of equity and fairness is monkish. Yes Murthy still considers India a poor country, and quite rightly so considering that close to 60 percent of the country still lives on less than Rs 140 a day. Murthy’s parting shot in the letter is as telling about the current nature of capitalism in India, as it is about what the nature of capitalism in the country needs to be. In such a scenario, it might seem that Murthy is being too idealistic and possibly quite out of sync with the rest of the world. Murthy’s advocacy of compassionate capitalism has strong roots in the Nordic and Scandinavian models of corporate capitalism that not only engages intensively with a social welfare state, but also puts self-restraining caps on executive salaries. 

Murthy is pointing to a model of capitalism that’s fundamentally different from the one that’s increasingly practiced in India. Instead of looking at Murthy’s letter only from the prism of Infosys and its changing dynamics, it would do all of us a world of good if we start looking at it as the first step to debating the contours of a new model of equitable capitalism for an emerging India. 

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”capitalism”,”India”]
Source: https://www.firstpost.com/business/infosys-salary-row-narayana-murthys-single-minded-focus-on-compassionate-capitalism-is-commendable-3365546.html

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 09-29-2018

Are you a Compassionate​ & Conscious Capitalist?

KARL R. LAPAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE NIIC. If you’re in business for the sole purpose of making money, you’re are ignoring other important stakeholders vital to a healthy business and positive bottom line. If your motivation is to help people first and foremost while making a living at the same time, you’re onto something. I believe capitalism and intentional altruism can and do intersect. 

It might also turn out that they might also be more successful financially. Buffet and Collins often remind us that saying no distinguishes super-successful people from successful people. Going above and beyond: Compassionate capitalists tend to live their life as servant leaders and are always willing to go the extra mile. People who practice this habit stand out, which in turn helps them to attract the right people, the right projects, and achieve higher personal job satisfaction. If you can incorporate even one of these principles into your life and business, I imagine you’d find great satisfaction in deeper relationships and also potentially a more robust bottom line. 

This behavior has the power to inspire others, creating a chain reaction that can only add to our society as a whole. Intentionally choose to be both a conscious and compassionate capitalist leader in your business. 

Keywords: [“business”,”people”,”might”]
Source: https://theniic.org/insights/are-you-a-compassionate%E2%80%8B-conscious-capitalist/

‘Compassionate capitalism’ urged for India

Narayan Murthy: One of the world’s most admired business leaders. Debate is currently raging throughout India over the economic policy of the new government, following a lukewarm media response and stock market jitters. Mr Murthy told BBC World Service’s The Interview programme that more had to be done to drive entrepreneurial activity. Mr Murthy is one of the world’s most admired business leaders, who gives much of his company’s wealth to charity. A growth rate of 7%-8% a year has been targeted by India’s Finance Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram. 

Mr Murthy said the only way to do this was to encourage a new set of entrepreneurs. He warned this would not happen if the approach was too hard-nosed. Mr Murthy pays himself less than $50,000 a year, and said his company stresses ethical use of profits, 96% of which come from business outside of India. He recalled that when India had bordered the old Soviet Union it had been very difficult to establish his company in 1981. Infosys develops software systems for a number of global giants. 

Mr Murthy said that when he set up the company, it took seven days of approval to travel outside India, and he waited a year to obtain a telephone for his office. Most importantly, they allowed foreign companies 100% equity in hi-tech companies in India. 

Keywords: [“India”,”Murthy”,”company”]
Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3757843.stm

Compassionate Capitalism

This podcast is part one of a conversation with David Meltzer, Co-Founder and CEO at Sports1Marketing. David is an executive, author, and humanitarian best known for his work in the field of sports marketing. He is a featured speaker at conferences, corporate meetings, seminars, and other events along with being featured in The New York Times, Sporting News, Fox Business, and Bloomberg. At Terranea Resort in Los Angeles, RevThink’s Tim Thompson and Joel Pilger lead a Creative Entrepreneurs conference on BULLETPROOFING PROFITS. Knowing that being our topic, we recognized our audience might show up thinking we were going to talk only about money. 

Much to everyone’s surprise, we revealed that profits in a creative firm are not about money, but rather about CHOICES and maintaining CONTROL of your business. In David’s talk, he provided us with break from all the talk of numbers plus a terrific dose of inspiration. Sharing his ideas from his books – one titled Connected To Goodness and the other titled Compassionate Capitalism – David’s message featured his stories of success, failure, redemption, and purpose. 

Keywords: [“David”,”talk”,”featured”]
Source: http://revthink.com/podcast-david-meltzer-compassionate-capitalism-part-one/

Businesses Doing Good: “Compassionate Capitalism” Alan McMillan Tickets, Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 10:00 AM

Alan McMillan was in the right place at the right time, Silicon Valley in years of dramatic transformation into the information age. He rode the crest of of the wave in sales and management and lived through the adreniline laced experiences of fianancial successes, job loss, getting re-hired, and then turned his life from success to significance when he returned with his wife, Kateri, to Athens, OH where he had attended Ohio University. Alan and Kateri bought a student apartment building and a convenience store with a rentable space for a restaurant. As they turned their hearts toward the needs of others, there was opportunity, and also a new vision of how compassion can be expressed through the way business is done. Alan McMillan is is the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Development at Hocking College and is an Adjunct Professor in Business at Ohio University in Athens, OH. 

From Sustainable to Flourishing Businesses and Communities. 

Keywords: [“Alan”,”student”,”Kateri”]
Source: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/businesses-doing-good-compassionate-capitalism-alan-mcmillan-tickets-48031669015

Compassionate Capitalism

With Christian values infusing all aspects of student life and administrative policy, Pepperdine has established an environment that assures both academic and personal betterment. Pepperdine’s standards for academic excellence are recognized internationally and are met through graduate and undergraduate programs across five schools, cutting-edge research, and exceptional faculty. Easily access information about Pepperdine’s admission requirements, financial aid programs, and the unique qualities of our diverse community. Christian values, firmly rooted in the Church of Christ heritage, are at the heart of Pepperdine. We invite you to examine, challenge, and grow your faith regardless of your spiritual background. 

Keywords: [“Pepperdine”,”programs”,”academic”]
Source: https://www.pepperdine.edu/entertainment-media-culture/events/conversations/tom-shadyac/ts2-compassionate-capitalism.htm

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-19-2018

COMING SOON – Leafwind the Compassionate Capitalist

Facing job cuts, IT needs capitalism in mind, socialism in heart: Narayana Murthy

For more than 20 years, the industry has generated enormous profits and created more than 40 million white-collar jobs. The future could be very different and NR Narayana Murthy, the father of Indian IT industry and founder of Infosys, has a prescription for the industry in these tough times. At the same time, I also realised that capitalism will only succeed if the leaders of capitalism demonstrate self-restraint in allocating a disproportionate part of wealth generated to themselves. I also realized that in a poor country like India if capitalism has to become acceptable and has to be embraced by a large section of our society, then the leaders of capitalism have to eschew vulgar display of wealth. In the interest of enhancing confidence in capitalism, we, the leaders of capitalism, must embrace compassionate capitalism. 

That is capitalism in the mind and socialism at heart – or, capitalism based on fairness, transparency and accountability. In every decision we, the leaders of capitalism, take, we have to ask whether our decision will enhance the respect for us in the eyes of our younger employees and whether respect for our corporations will be enhanced in the eyes of the society. If we follow these principles, I believe, we will be in a position to save capitalism from premature death in India and bring the benefit of capitalism to the vast majority of Indians. The challenge for our industry leaders is to create new markets and create new opportunities and jobs in the scenario of changing technologies. The market for the IT industry may shrink and that is beyond anybody. 

It is very important for leaders of capitalism to be fair to their younger colleagues when the issue of retrenchment comes. All of us have to practice capitalism in mind and socialism in heart. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”industry”,”employee”]
Source: https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/companies/facing-job-cuts-it-needs-capitalism-in-mind-socialism-in-heart-narayana-murthy-2294675.html

Compassionate capitalism: Why Murthy is right in opposing Infy CEO Vishal Sikka’s pay hike

New Delhi: N R Narayana Murthy and his wife Sudha are known to be frugal, despite being a billionaire couple. A news report mentions today that amid the raging controversy over the company Murthy co-founded – Infosys – he treated Infosys’ Chairman R Seshsayee to simple breakfast of idli and dosa at his modest Bengaluru residence yesterday morning. No fancy multi-course meal for the Murthys and none obviously for their guests. When last week Murthy raised the issue of the Infosys CEO’s obscene salary, triggering the present crisis, one was forced to sit up and take notice. For the last few days, newspaper reports have spoken of Murthy’s displeasure with the proposal to further increase Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka’s remuneration. 

Founders together own about 13 percent in Infosys and have been a collective weighty voice on important matters. Murthy has also voiced concerns over a large severance package devised for the ex-CFO. On the former, Chairman R Seshasayee said last evening everything was in order. There are no major corporate governance issues at Infosys but the company and its management should look at perception issues which have cropped up after Murthy pointed out the obvious. No one is saying that Sikka’s pay packet violates any law, neither has it been kept a secret. 

The remuneration Sikka received in FY16 was duly approved by Infosys’ board of directors and has been duly disclosed in the company’s annual report. The issue is really this: the obscene amount of money Sikka earns to run Infosys may perhaps be justified by the salary math the world’s top corporate honchos apply to their own packages but makes little sense when put in perspective. This piece shows Sikka took home a salary which was 935 times the median pay at Infosys last fiscal. 

Keywords: [“Infosys”,”Murthy”,”Sikka”]
Source: https://www.firstpost.com/business/compassionate-capitalism-why-murthy-is-right-in-opposing-infy-ceo-vishal-sikkas-pay-hike-3282544.html

Constructive capitalism

In July of 2015 Dr. Bronner’s became a Benefit Corporation with the State of California. A Benefit Corporation is a for-profit corporation that has positive impact on society and the environment according to legally defined goals. A Benefit Corporation can also identify specific public benefits as additional purposes. Expand public awareness of environmental and social issues. 

Make products and source ingredients that are fair trade certified and USDA certified organic whenever possible. Promote equitable compensation: pay executives no more than five times the total compensation paid to fully-vested, lowest paid employees. Bronner’s growth and our pursuit of public benefit are advanced by our environmental and social activism. To that end, our owners and officers cannot be sued for pursuing such activism. We’re also a certified B Corp™Certified B Corps™ are for-profit companies certified by the nonprofit B Lab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency. 

B Corp™ Certification provides a useful third-party measurement tool to meet our performance assessment and transparency requirements as a Benefit Corporation. The B Impact Assessment model used by B Lab gives us an objective standard to track our improvements over time. As a Certified B Corp™ we are now in a more formal alliance with other companies who are committed to modeling ethical and progressive approaches to business. 

Keywords: [“Benefit”,”Corporation”,”certified”]
Source: https://www.drbronner.com/about/ourselves/constructive-capitalism/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-04-2018

Compassionate Capitalism

Google has made it possible for anyone with an Android phone to call any phone number using Google Talk. If you have a cell phone from any one of the carriers, they provide airtime. As the years progressed, so did the lack of phone calls. So to look at a specific approach to this idea I call Compassionate Capitalism, there is one company that is very aware of it. Microsoft and their dominate Persecutory Capitalism doesn’t fit in any more. I heard a rumor that Google is building a free nationwide network which is strictly wireless internet. With a Droid phone, you can acquire this wireless network and make calls, surf the net, get texts, all that stufffor free. Cricket, might be the prime candidate for the air time while this wireless network is built. My understanding is that they built their own network. I going over to Cricket and enjoy the savings, strongly awaiting the Google Wireless Network.

Keywords: [“network”,”call”,”phone”]
Source: https://rjbresnik.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/compassionate-capitalism

Anger is Justified.

Of course we can rebuild the NHS in the image of market forces while asking it to cut costs, and of course that won’t affect standards of care. Of course we can cut funds that are vital for the poorest students to attend higher education, and of course that won’t affect social mobility. Of course we can cut certain child protection units, and of course that won’t affect prevention of abuse. Of course we can cut education, and of course that won’t affect our people. Of course we can cut frontline services, and of course that won’t affect their quality. Of course we can cut disability benefits, and of course that won’t affect the quality of life of those who aren’t conventionally able. Experts, who needs experts, we’re politicians! Of course we can gloss over the public’s concerns.

Keywords: [“course”,”affect”,”won't”]
Source: https://angerisjustified.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

Origin of the Spirit of Capitalism: Middle Ages Scholasticism, not Protestantism « Conservative Colloquium

In the lecture at the link below, Samuel Gregg, Director of Research at the Acton Institute, critiques Weber’s claim that Protestantism gave rise to the spirit of capitalism. He argues that medieval scholastics actually gave rise to the ideas that would form the foundation of the spirit of capitalism. Tagged: Catholicism and capitalism, Christianity and capitalism, free market, late scholastics, market, medieval capitalism, medieval capitalists, medieval scholastics, Middle Ages, origin of capitalism, origin of the idea of capitalism, origin of the spirit of capitalism, Spain, spirit of capitalism, Weber. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”medieval”,”spirit”]
Source: https://conservativecolloquium.wordpress.com/2008/03/31/origin-of…

Balancing Capitalism and Compassion

Distinguished experts Dr. Bruce Mizrach, Professor of Economics Rutgers University and Dr. Cathy O’Neil former hedge fund analyst and analyst for Risk Metrics, a blogger as Mathbabe and currently with Intent Media will take on the interesting issues involved in balancing capitalism and compassion. Free and Open to the Public, there will also be a discussion and open question and answer session. Wyckoff resident and NJPPN steering committee member,Dr. The program conducted by North Jersey Public Policy Network , a non-partisan,non-profit and 100% volunteer network that provides education programs on important societal issues and believes facts matter in obtaining the best solutions to public policy.

Keywords: [“Public”,”Network”,”Policy”]
Source: https://patch.com/…/paramus/ev–balancing-capitalism-and-compassion

Brief essays about a smaller, more compassionate version of capitalism

In the last few years, I’ve noticed a growing trend of fascination with the small. The family farm, the microbrewery, and the boutique craft store all represent our societies growing attraction to the idea of small and compassionate threads making up the fabric of our capitalist society. Its not really capitalism that we’re afraid of or opposed to – it’s mega capitalism – factory farms, banks to0 big to fail, superpacs, and big box stores that stir the exploited public towards frustration. So here I set out to compile a set of essays based on my observation of the growing trend of the public towards a smaller, more compassionate form of capitalism.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”small”,”growing”]
Source: https://smallcapitalism.wordpress.com

Hybrid Economics – The balance between capitalism and socialism

If you are an extreme capitalist, you’re probably wrong. If you are an extreme socialist, you’re probably wrong. The right answer lies somewhere in between these two extremes. Consider my widget company:In an extreme capitalism I can hire thieves to take my competitor’s truck fleet at night when he’s sleeping, or maybe just murder him outright to increase my profits. In an extreme socialism the government can tell me that they don’t approve of my widget business, or require me to operate my business according to their instructions. The right answer is to be able to pursue my own ideas the way that I want, but within the limits of civility.

Keywords: [“extreme”,”business”,”widget”]
Source: https://goodflagbetsy.wordpress.com/hybrid-economics-the-balance…

Narayana Murthy and Compassionate Capitalism

Narayana Murthy’s roles at Infosys Technologies-as a co-founder, longtime CEO, and nonexecutive chairman and chief mentor-has been marked by explosive growth, demanding management challenges, and widely lauded company leadership. Traces the development of Murthy as a child, scholar, businessman, and political and social activist. Traces the links between Murthy’s principles and the business practices that repeatedly brought Infosys Technologies recognition as one of India’s most admired and best managed companies. Raises questions in his mind about the place of philanthropic principles in the management of a business enterprise.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”philosophy”,”leadership”]
Source: https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/item.aspx?num=32597

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-09-2018

Compassionate Capitalism by Rich DeVos, Rich Devos |, Paperback

Compassionate capitalism? How could that be? Doesn’t “Capitalism” mean “Dog-eat-dog, law of the jungle, every person for himself”? Rich DeVos, co-founder and former president of Amway, responds to this hard-nosed approach with a resounding “No.” He offers more than a vision in this extraordinary book. A plan that has made him one of America’s richest men, and that has made Amway one of the great corporate success stories of our time. Compassionate Capitalism spells out clearly and eloquently the guiding principles and concrete steps to making your life and your world better. Rich DeVos shows how your energy, your ambition, and your spirit of enterprise can travel together down a path in which the spirit of capitalism and moral values inextricably merge. Interweaving his own amazing story with vivid personal histories of men and women around the world, Rich DeVos illustrates both how success is achieved and what it truly means. He demonstrates that compassionate capitalism is the only solution to the most crucial issues of our time, and to the many other challenges that face us in the closing decade of this century and in the beginning of the next.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”DeVos”,”Rich”]
Source: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/compassionate-capitalism-rich-devos/1001895513

Nonfiction Book Review: Compassionate Capitalism by Rich DeVos, Author, Richard M. Devos, Author Dutton Books $22 ISBN 978-0-525-93567-4

Recently there has been a deluge of books on managerial theory, “how-to” scenarios and inspirational tomes about the “good life,” but rarely can an author combine these genres. DeVos, co-founder and retired president of Amway, does so effectively with this study of how to be entrepreneurial, successful and compassionate. Offering dozens of emotional anecdotes about struggling and then successful people he knew at Amway, DeVos develops an intriguing 16-part “Credo for Compassionate Capitalism” that draws heavily on the Judeo-Christian ethical tradition, then melds its precepts with those of capitalism. His thoughts on helping others, racial and religious toleration and the environment are impressive, as are his positions on credit availability and business behavior. Of obvious interest to Amway’s two million distributors, his book should also have strong appeal for general readers.

Keywords: [“Amway”,”Capitalism”,”DeVos”]
Source: https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-525-93567-4

Compassionate Capitalism: How Corporations Can Make Doing Good an Integral Part of Doing Well: Marc Benioff, Karen Southwick: 9781564147141: Amazon.com: Books

MARC BENIOFF is CEO and chairman of salesforce.com, a leading provider of online business applications, and creator of the salesforce.com Foundation. A former sales and marketing executive at Oracle Corporation, he is now enlisting his energy and ambition in building a new model for global philanthropy, as portrayed in this book. KAREN SOUTHWICK is an experienced journalist who has worked for several magazines, including Forbes ASAP and Upside, and metropolitan daily newspapers, including the San Francisco Chronicle. She has written four books on the business side of technology, most recently Everyone Else Must Fail: The Unvarnished Truth about Oracle and Larry Ellison, published in November 2003 by Random House/Crown. She is currently an executive editor at CNET News.com. This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Keywords: [“salesforce.com”,”business”,”executive”]
Source: https://www.amazon.com/Compassionate-Capitalism-Corporations-Doing-Integral/dp/1564147142

Entrepreneurs + Investors + Funded Innovation + Generational Wealth + Compassionate Capitalism

History has shown that the Greatest Wealth is Created through Entrepreneurism. Every Innovation that improves our lives came from an Entrepreneur with an idea; a strategy to succeed; and the funding to execute. The Good News: You don’t have to start a great company when you can invest in a great company and reap the same rewards as the founders. Recent regulatory changes have made that easier than ever to happen. We help Entrepreneurs and Investors create their legacy in the innovation they bring to market and the generational wealth they create. The men and women who take the road less traveled and invest in exciting private companies before they go public, have the opportunity that few realize – create wealth, leave a legacy of innovation, and have personal pride in knowing they impacted their community with new jobs and opportunities.

Keywords: [“Wealth”,”create”,”company”]
Source: http://www.karenrands.co/

How to Create Compassionate Capitalism in Business-David Metzler 01/18 by The Bottom Line Show LIVE

David Meltzer is the Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer at Sports 1 Marketing where he utilizes his relationship capital and situational knowledge to secure diverse business opportunities for all our clients and partners. David has spent the last 25 years as an entrepreneur and executive in the legal, technology, and sports and entertainment fields with expertise across many industry verticals. David launched his career in sports at the world’s most notable sports agency, Leigh Steinberg Sports & Entertainment, serving as CEO, where along with Leigh and Warren, negotiated over $2 billion in sports and entertainment contracts. David sits on numerous boards including JUST capital, OCTANE business incubator, Celebvidy, Rose Bowl Foundation, Transformational Leadership Council, Unstoppable Foundation, among several others.

Keywords: [“Sports”,”David”,”entertainment”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebottomlineshow/2017/01/18/how-to-create-compassionate-capitalism-in-business-david-metzler

Narayana Murthy and Compassionate Capitalism

Narayana Murthy’s roles at Infosys Technologies-as a co-founder, longtime CEO, and nonexecutive chairman and chief mentor-has been marked by explosive growth, demanding management challenges, and widely lauded company leadership. His personal leadership philosophy has been articulated through and driven by his philosophy of “Compassionate capitalism.” Profiles Murthy’s philosophy and leadership principles. Traces the development of Murthy as a child, scholar, businessman, and political and social activist. Traces the links between Murthy’s principles and the business practices that repeatedly brought Infosys Technologies recognition as one of India’s most admired and best managed companies. Raises questions in his mind about the place of philanthropic principles in the management of a business enterprise.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”philosophy”,”leadership”]
Source: https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/item.aspx?num=32597

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-05-2018

SparkNotes: The Jungle: Themes

The main theme of The Jungle is the evil of capitalism. Every event, especially in the first twenty-seven chapters of the book, is chosen deliberately to portray a particular failure of capitalism, which is, in Sinclair’s view, inhuman, destructive, unjust, brutal, and violent. The slow annihilation of Jurgis’s immigrant family at the hands of a cruel and prejudiced economic and social system demonstrates the effect of capitalism on the working class as a whole. As the immigrants, who initially possess an idealistic faith in the American Dream of hard work leading to material success, are slowly used up, tortured, and destroyed, the novel relentlessly illustrates that capitalism is to blame for their plight and emphasizes that the characters’ individual stories are the stories of millions of people. The Jungle is not a thematically nuanced or complicated novel: capitalism is simply portrayed as a total evil, from its greedy destruction of children to its cynical willingness to sell diseased meat to an unsuspecting public. Sinclair opts not to explore the psychology of capitalism; instead, he simply presents a long litany of the ugly effects of capitalism on the world. In Sinclair’s view, socialism is the cure for all of the problems that capitalism creates. When socialism is introduced, it is shown to be as good as capitalism is evil; whereas capitalism destroys the many for the benefit of the few, socialism works for the benefit of everyone. Because the family that Sinclair uses to represent the struggle of the working class under capitalism is a group of Lithuanian immigrants, the novel is also able to explore the plight of immigrants in America. Sinclair doesn’t attack the American Dream; instead, he uses the disintegration of the family to illustrate his belief that capitalism itself is an attack on the values that support the American Dream, which has long since been rendered hollow by the immoral value of greed.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”work”,”family”]
Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/jungle/themes

Vagammon Narayana Murthy teaches corporates about ‘Compassionate Capitalism’

Corporate thought-leader and Infosys co-founder NR Narayana Murthy has flayed the high wage hikes that senior managements have been apportioning to themselves when the software industry is in trying times and has advised them to make “Sacrifices” to maintain common man’s faith in capitalism. Conceding that times are difficult for the IT services sector, Murthy dismissed the commonly attributed threats of artificial intelligence and automation as “More hype than reality”. Terming the trend of no hikes for juniors and freshers as “Worrisome,” Murthy rued that the senior level people have been taking handsome hikes. “I think that is not the way to make capitalism acceptable to the larger masses in a country that has huge poverty,” he said, speaking at the IIT-Bombay over the weekend. “If we believe in capitalism, if we believe that is the best solution for the country to move forward, then the leaders of capitalism will have to demonstrate self-restraints in apportioning to themselves the part of the benefits that come out of running companies, Murthy, who mostly flies the economy class, added.” Murthy, a strong proponent of “Compassionate capitalism” since his days in the company, did not make any reference to Infosys. It can be noted that over the past few months, Murthy had gone public with his displeasure over senior executive compensation at Infosys. Speaking before the students at the prestigious institute, Murthy said in the last seven years, the salaries of freshers in the software industry have stayed stagnant while the same for senior-level employees have grown by up to 1,000 per cent. “There is this whole thing about automation and artificial intelligence. That is much more hype than the reality, at-least in the software services,” Murthy said. The domestic IT sector employs over 4 million directly and its revenues have crossed over USD 150 billion, according to industry lobby Nasscom.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”capitalism”,”over”]
Source: https://www.vagammon.com/narayana-murthy-teaches-corporates-about…

How Capitalism Creates The Welfare State « The Dish

The more capitalism and wealth, the familiar argument goes, the better able we are to do without a safety net for the poor, elderly, sick and young. What it doesn’t get at is that the forces that free market capitalism unleashes are precisely the forces that undermine traditional forms of community and family that once served as a traditional safety net, free from government control. In the West, it happened slowly – with the welfare state emerging in 19th century Germany and spreading elsewhere, as individuals uprooted themselves from their home towns and forged new careers, lives and families in the big cities, with all the broken homes, deserted villages, and bewildered families they left behind. We can forget this but the cultural contradictions of capitalism, brilliantly explained in Daniel Bell’s classic volume, are indeed contradictions. They did so in part for humane reasons – but also because they realized that unless capitalism red in tooth and claw were complemented by some collective cushioning, it would soon fall prey to more revolutionary movements. The safety net was created to save capitalism from itself, not to attack capitalism. This is not to argue against the conservative notion that it is precisely because of capitalism that we have to foster greater family bonds, keep marriage alive, communities together. The forces of global capitalism – now unleashed on an unprecedented global scale with China, Russia, Brazil and India – are destroying the kind of society which allows and encourages stability, traditional families, and self-sufficient community. One reason, I think, that Obama’s move toward a slightly more effective welfare state has not met strong resistance – and is clearly winning the American argument – is that the sheer force of this global capitalism is coming to bear down on America more fiercely than ever before. Capitalism destroys the very structure of the societies it enriches.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”family”,”conservative”]
Source: http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/…/how-capitalism-creates-the-welfare-state

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

The Book of Life

In modern times, one of the criticisms you’ll sometimes hear people make. Glamour is the reflexive sheen afforded to people and things by the approval of. We don’t think we hate cheap things – but we frequently behave as if we. One key thing that can go wrong in our thinking about a career is that we get. ‘Creativity’ is one of the most prestigious ideas of modern times and as a.Authentic Work. One of the ideas that circulates below the surface of modern life is that work. People have been making pornography for a very long time. One of the things that separates confident from diffident people is their sense. Modern life is, in many ways, founded around the idea of progress: the notion. Most of the time, successful modern life involves lots of technology,. One of the unexpectedly important things that art can do for us is teach us how. If the idea of being a ‘modern’ person and leading a ‘modern’ life.

Keywords: [“thing”,”time”,”modern”]
Source: http://www.thebookoflife.org/category/capitalism

Nonfiction Book Review: Compassionate Capitalism by Rich DeVos, Author, Richard M. Devos, Author Dutton Books $22 ISBN 978-0-525-93567-4

Recently there has been a deluge of books on managerial theory, “how-to” scenarios and inspirational tomes about the “good life,” but rarely can an author combine these genres. DeVos, co-founder and retired president of Amway, does so effectively with this study of how to be entrepreneurial, successful and compassionate. Offering dozens of emotional anecdotes about struggling and then successful people he knew at Amway, DeVos develops an intriguing 16-part “Credo for Compassionate Capitalism” that draws heavily on the Judeo-Christian ethical tradition, then melds its precepts with those of capitalism. His thoughts on helping others, racial and religious toleration and the environment are impressive, as are his positions on credit availability and business behavior. Of obvious interest to Amway’s two million distributors, his book should also have strong appeal for general readers.

Keywords: [“Amway”,”Capitalism”,”DeVos”]
Source: https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-525-93567-4

Entrepreneurs + Investors + Funded Innovation + Generational Wealth + Compassionate Capitalism

History has shown that the Greatest Wealth is Created through Entrepreneurism. Every Innovation that improves our lives came from an Entrepreneur with an idea; a strategy to succeed; and the funding to execute. The Good News: You don’t have to start a great company when you can invest in a great company and reap the same rewards as the founders. Recent regulatory changes have made that easier than ever to happen. We help Entrepreneurs and Investors create their legacy in the innovation they bring to market and the generational wealth they create. The men and women who take the road less traveled and invest in exciting private companies before they go public, have the opportunity that few realize – create wealth, leave a legacy of innovation, and have personal pride in knowing they impacted their community with new jobs and opportunities.

Keywords: [“Wealth”,”create”,”company”]
Source: http://www.karenrands.co

Compassionate Capitalism: How Corporations Can Make Doing Good an Integral Part of Doing Well by Marc Benioff, Karen Southwick[PDF] Ebook Download

What if every corporation in the world devoted one percent of its revenues, one percent of its employees’ time, and one percent of its stock to the communities it serves? What would happen? It would change the world. This book suggests that such a radical change is possible, and lays out the blueprint to do so, with a radically new model in which companies leverage all of their assets-including employees, equity, products, and relationships-in order to provide real value to the communities in which they operate. Case studies look at how both large and small companies, have structured their philanthropy programs for maximum effectiveness and true integration. Here is the essential guide for everyone, from the newly minted entrepreneur to the Fortune 500 CEO who wants to ensure that doing business goes hand in hand with doing good.

Keywords: [“percent”,”employees”,”world”]
Source: https://academicebook.com/ebooks/compassionate-capitalism-1817358

Narayana Murthy and Compassionate Capitalism

Narayana Murthy’s roles at Infosys Technologies-as a co-founder, longtime CEO, and nonexecutive chairman and chief mentor-has been marked by explosive growth, demanding management challenges, and widely lauded company leadership. His personal leadership philosophy has been articulated through and driven by his philosophy of “Compassionate capitalism.” Profiles Murthy’s philosophy and leadership principles. Traces the development of Murthy as a child, scholar, businessman, and political and social activist. Traces the links between Murthy’s principles and the business practices that repeatedly brought Infosys Technologies recognition as one of India’s most admired and best managed companies. Raises questions in his mind about the place of philanthropic principles in the management of a business enterprise.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”philosophy”,”leadership”]
Source: http://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/item.aspx?num=32597

Compassionate capitalism in the Middle Ages: Profit and philanthropy in medieval Cambridge

Contemporary businesses are frequently challenged to invest the profits from their commercial successes into projects that benefit society. This is not a new concept – this column reports that it began as early as the medieval period. Profits from property speculation in the Middle Ages were re-invested into local communities. Compassionate capitalism involved high levels of charitable giving to hospitals, monasteries, churches, and colleges, which helped to disseminate the economic benefits of investments from individuals to the wider community. This entry was posted on May 9, 2017 at 1:59 pm and is filed under Academic research & research papers, Economics – macro, micro etc. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Keywords: [“profits”,”community”,”benefit”]
Source: https://mostlyeconomics.wordpress.com/2017/05/09/compassionate…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

naked capitalism

How New York City is tackling a mental health crisis spurred by Hurricane Sandy Grist. India knocked its new, $3 billion nuclear-missile sub out of commission – by leaving a hatch open Business Insider (David L). Brexit. Brussels warns UK companies of shut-out in event of no-deal Brexit Financial Times. Trump says he’ll take heat for immigration deal The Hill. Shorter: Trump has always had terrible impulse control. Judge blocks Trump admin from ending DACA program The Hill. Trump’s lawyers may have seen this coming, hence the willingness to deal with Dems. Don’t believe Michael Wolff’s book about Trump if you want the truth The Hill. Trump health pick wary of government drug price negotiations Associated Press. Resilc: “Wake me up 3 years after Trump beats Joe Biden.” By virtue of how the site has evolved, NC is much less vulnerable to being stomped on by Google and FB than most “Alternative” news and commentary sites, but the cost of being less vulnerable is less reach, which translates into lower traffic and most important, probably lower acquisition of new readers. US billionaire busted with stolen Greek antiquities Archaeology News.

Keywords: [“Trump”,”New”,”How”]
Source: https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2018/01/links-11018.html

A Better World: Compassionate Capitalism

‘Compassionate capitalism’ urged for India. Indian entrepreneur Narayan Murthy, founder of global software giant Infosys, says “Compassionate capitalism” is the only solution to poverty in the country. Narayan Murthy: One of the world’s most admired business leaders Debate is currently raging throughout India over the economic policy of the new government, following a lukewarm media response and stock market jitters. Mr Murthy told BBC World Service’s The Interview programme that more had to be done to drive entrepreneurial activity. “We believe that if India has to solve its problem of poverty, we have to embrace capitalism, ensure that jobs are created, and make sure that market-driven policies are accepted,” he said. “However, to do that, the people who are the evangelists of capitalism, must conduct themselves in a manner that will appeal to the masses.”People must be able to relate to them easily. They must lead a normal life, a simple life, and people must be able to say, ‘look, if these jokers can do it, we can do it better’. To advertise on this blog / buy inspirational books / conduct motivational seminar contact on 9820073993.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”Murthy”,”India”]
Source: http://sudhir-pai.blogspot.com/2016/09/source-sulekha-writer-our-india.html

[Podcast] David Meltzer – Compassionate Capitalism

This podcast is part one of a conversation with David Meltzer, Co-Founder and CEO at Sports1Marketing. David is an executive, author, and humanitarian best known for his work in the field of sports marketing. He is a featured speaker at conferences, corporate meetings, seminars, and other events along with being featured in The New York Times, Sporting News, Fox Business, and Bloomberg. At Terranea Resort in Los Angeles, RevThink’s Tim Thompson and Joel Pilger lead a Creative Entrepreneurs conference on BULLETPROOFING PROFITS. Knowing that being our topic, we recognized our audience might show up thinking we were going to talk only about money. Much to everyone’s surprise, we revealed that profits in a creative firm are not about money, but rather about CHOICES and maintaining CONTROL of your business. In David’s talk, he provided us with break from all the talk of numbers plus a terrific dose of inspiration. Sharing his ideas from his books – one titled Connected To Goodness and the other titled Compassionate Capitalism – David’s message featured his stories of success, failure, redemption, and purpose.

Keywords: [“David”,”talk”,”featured”]
Source: http://www.revthink.com/podcast-david-meltzer-compassionate-capitalism…

Is compassion compatible with capitalism?

While there may be compassionate individuals operating within capitalist systems, capitalism itself does not naturally merge with compassion. I say this with a much stronger understanding of compassion than I do of capitalism and all of its manifestations. Capitalism did not create competition, however it does need it for survival. Capitalism can never be cooperative or communal; it lives on competition. Competition does not allow for mutual empathic experiences. Competition takes advantage of others’ weakness, exploits vulnerabilities, and doesn’t look back. If there are no winners or losers, then a competition did not take place. Without competition, there can be no capitalism. Admittedly, capitalists can be compassionate, but they are not operating within an essentially compassionate system. As a system, capitalism features an elite minority being supported by a majority. It must be noted that capitalism can hardly be faulted for not being compassionate. It shouldn’t be said that capitalism lacks compassion any more than it lacks wisdom, or empathy, or mindfulness, or other lofty ideals/practices that many aspire to.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”competition”,”compassionate”]
Source: https://www.quora.com/Is-compassion-compatible-with-capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism

Blaine Bartlett joins Ivan Misner to discuss his International Best Selling book, “Compassionate Capitalism: Journey to the Soul of Business”. Pay attention to the soul of your business or you might miss incredible opportunities. Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. Its activities transcend national and international borders. Its activities are not unduly constrained by financial, political, cultural, ethnic, or religious concerns. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. In the world today, the absolute opposite of this occurs. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. Traditional capitalism forgets an important variable, that of happiness. The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. It is not to produce ever-cheaper goods and services. Compassionate capitalism is an economic system meant to make a lot of money, help a lot of people, and have a lot of fun.

Keywords: [“Business”,”today”,”Capitalism”]
Source: http://ivanmisner.com/compassionate-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Compassionate Capitalism by Rich DeVos

Una guía para seguir los sueños, respetarlos y mantenerse fiel a ellos , un mensaje enfocado en poner los dones y talentos al servicio de los demás , un libro predicador de la filosofía del ganar-ganar , la generosidad y la satisfacción obtenida de la recompensa por el esfuerzo empleado. Resumiendo así esta gran obra en un término acuñado como Capitalismo solidario. El libro se pasea por biografías e historias de emprendedores, empresarios y visionarios cuyos. El libro se pasea por biografías e historias de emprendedores, empresarios y visionarios cuyos esfuerzos en pos de la superación personal los han llevado a la cumbre. Y que bajo la guía y reflexión de Rich Devos todos ellos comparten sus frustraciones, experiencias y enseñanzas con el lector para acercarlo a la realización del éxito. Comparto con todos ustedes este fragmento obtenido del libro Capitalismo solidario. “En alguna parte de usted su espíritu emprendedor esta luchando por ser libre”. “Y algún día usted sabrá que la verdadera satisfacción que proporciona el capitalismo solidario no es el encontrar su propia realización y seguridad financiera personal. La verdadera satisfacción es ayudar a otras personas a encontrar para si mismas su realización y seguridad financiera”.

Keywords: [“libro”,”por”,”los”]
Source: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3277696-compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate

Book is in good condition with no missing pages, no damage or soiling and tight spine. There may be some dog-eared pages showing previous use but overall a great book. Please note, cover images are illustrative only, and the actual book cover and edition can vary. Just Get on with It!: A Caring, Compassionate Kick Up the Ass! This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. See all our books here, order more than 1 book and get discounted shipping. The Dog Whisperer: A Compassionate, Nonviolent Approach to Dog Training This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The spine of the book is still in great condition and the front cover is generally unmarked. Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover. The Dog Whisperer: A Compassionate, Nonviolent Approach to Dog Training This book is in good or better condition. Mental Health Nursing: The Art of Compassionate Care This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. Mental Health Nursing: The Art of Compassionate Care This book is in good or better condition. EX-LIBRARY. MAY HAVE USUAL LIBRARY PARAPHERNALIA. Usual signs of a well read book but good overall condition.

Keywords: [“book”,”condition”,”good”]
Source: https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/compassionate…

Narayana Murthy and Compassionate Capitalism

An electronic Educator Copy from the situation isn’t available through this website. Narayana Murthy’s roles at Infosys Technologies-like a co-founder, longtime Boss, and nonexecutive chairman and chief mentor-continues to be marked by explosive growth, demanding management challenges, and broadly famous company leadership. His personal leadership philosophy continues to be articulated through and driven by his philosophy of “Compassionate capitalism.” Profiles Murthy’s philosophy and leadership concepts. Traces the introduction of Murthy growing up, scholar, businessman, and social and political activist. Traces the hyperlinks between Murthy’s concepts and also the business practices that frequently introduced Infosys Technologies recognition among India’s most respected and finest handled companies. Boosts questions in the mind concerning the host to philanthropic concepts within the control over a company enterprise. Set a reminder to receive an email after your university’s case study deadline. Get a reminder after your University’s official deadline. As soon as you are done with your solution, you will receive a notification to earn up to $50 by selling your solution to us. If you already have a case study solution you want to sell, submit it here.

Keywords: [“Murthy”,”concepts”,”philosophy”]
Source: https://www.casehero.com/narayana-murthy-and-compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate capitalism, is there such a thing?

Countries with a more even distribution of wealth have better social cohesion, less poverty, do better on psychological research in terms of happiness and have better public services and infrastructure. No-one would argue that the gap between developing countries and the West doesn’t matter – so how can anyone argue the gap within countries doesn’t matter? The gap isn’t the size it is because wealthy people are more talented. Over the past three decades, the income of company directors and chief execs has tripled – have these people really worked three times harder or become three times more talented? I think not. Finance does have a certain use but so do many less well rewarded sectors. Finance has got too big for its boots – and we’ve all seen the results. Seen how it’s not those responsible for the crisis who have suffered. Clearly those who work in it are far from perfect or clever or socially useful. The domination of our economy by finance through government policy has been a bad thing. We need a better balanced economy which would lead to a fairer distribution of wealth. I don’t see why the people who fiddle about with my pension fund are worth 40 times what the people who invest in it earn. We provide the investments that help them earn a living.

Keywords: [“people”,”better”,”gap”]
Source: https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/politics/978266-Compassionate…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

‘Compassionate capitalism’ urged for India

Indian entrepreneur Narayan Murthy, founder of global software giant Infosys, says “Compassionate capitalism” is the only solution to poverty in the country. Debate is currently raging throughout India over the economic policy of the new government, following a lukewarm media response and stock market jitters. “We believe that if India has to solve its problem of poverty, we have to embrace capitalism, ensure that jobs are created, and make sure that market-driven policies are accepted,” he said. Mr Murthy is one of the world’s most admired business leaders, who gives much of his company’s wealth to charity. A growth rate of 7%-8% a year has been targeted by India’s Finance Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram. Mr Murthy pays himself less than $50,000 a year, and said his company stresses ethical use of profits, 96% of which come from business outside of India. He recalled that when India had bordered the old Soviet Union it had been very difficult to establish his company in 1981. “I wanted to come back to India and conduct an experiment in creating wealth legally and ethically, and creating jobs, because I thought that was the best way of eliminating poverty. That’s how Infosys was born.” Mr Murthy said that when he set up the company, it took seven days of approval to travel outside India, and he waited a year to obtain a telephone for his office. Most importantly, they allowed foreign companies 100% equity in hi-tech companies in India. “That meant these great multinationals came to India – IBM, Digital, Texas Instruments, Microsoft,” he said. “Once they came to India, we learned a lot of good things from them – human resources policies, the importance of physical infrastructure, technology, a market-driven approach.”

Keywords: [“India”,”Murthy”,”company”]
Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3757843.stm

The rule of law Conscious Capitalism = four primary principles plus Conscious Business What is a Conscious Business? Conscious Business is based on four primary principles i i l off enterprise: t i 1. The enterprise has a higher purpose beyond maximizing profits and shareholder value 2. The enterprise is managed to optimize value for all of the major interdependent stakeholders 3. If we look for win-winwin solutions we’ll find them instead. The human mind is infinitely creative. Conscious Capitalism creates new mental pathways to unleash human creativity. G, fuel cell & solar Green Building, installations Store Green Mission Teams Sustainable seafood Animal Welfare program for livestock Environmental strategy should be thought off as win-win-win-win i i i i Sustainable Seafood Worldwide we are using about 300 billion pounds of seafood per year North Atlantic Cod has been reduced by 98% in the past 40 years; white abalone is almost extinct; Bluefin tuna reduced by 75% to 90%; many other species are being fished beyond sustainability Problem of by-catch-15 billion pounds a year, 27% from shrimp fishing g Coral Reefs are being systematically destroyed Save the Whales! Still being hunted by Japan, Iceland and Norway. As Gandhi said: “We must be the change that we wish to see in the world.” We should consider the virtues of love and care in all of our l d leadership hi promotion ti decisions. We must “Give permission” for love and care to be expressed in the organization. G Many y organizations are afraid of love and care and force them to remain hidden. Practice forgiveness rather than judgment and condemnation. Too many organizations believe that judgment of others and criticizing failures are essential for creating excellence.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”Business”,”seafood”]
Source: http://mendoza.nd.edu/assets/151593/j_mackey_march_2010.pdf

The Case For Compassionate Capitalism

The closer we looked at capitalism, the more we found it wanting. To save capitalism from itself, FDR introduced what turned out to be the crucial missing ingredient: compassion. The damage done to the country during the Depression convinced him that unregulated capitalism always favors the rich at the expense of everyone else. So to save capitalism from itself, FDR introduced what turned out to be the crucial missing ingredient: compassion. Compassionate capitalism worked for everyone without busting the federal budget. Under Roosevelt’s compassionate capitalism – even with a Great Depression and a Second World War – the federal budget quickly came right back into balance. By the time Eisenhower was elected, compassionate capitalism was tightly woven into the fabric of American democracy. America’s social safety net was never viewed as the cause of eye-popping deficits until a radical group of political nihilists decided that the best way to kill the compassion in capitalism was to stubbornly refuse to pay for it. The reason compassionate capitalism is still hugely popular – Tea Party extremists notwithstanding – is because it works. America’s social safety net was never viewed as the cause of eye-popping deficits until a radical group of political nihilists, led by people like Grover Norquist, decided that the best way to kill the compassion in capitalism was to stubbornly refuse to pay for it – and then blame the resulting deficits on the lie that compassion itself is just too damn expensive. History has repeatedly demonstrated that compassionate capitalism leads to balanced budgets, a robust economy, and a piece of the opportunity pie for every citizen seated at America’s table. If we take the compassion out of capitalism, what’s left? 1929.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”deficit”,”budget”]
Source: http://www.wbur.org/cognoscenti/2013/03/21/nick-paleologos