J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-12-2018

What is Communism?

Communism works the day people dare to open their minds, hearts and everything there is to open, and lay down all kinds of judgment. As the world is now, communism will never work, and the beginning of world wide communism would have to be fitted to every area, but in time they all would work for a common goal and the science will move a lot faster than it does today. Communism offers rich leaders and all poor people; it is a failed ideology. In Communism, people would work because they would know the necessity of their and work, if they refused to work they would not benefit from the labor of others. The closest thing a Communism would have to a government would be councils elected by the people, councils which would be kept under control by the people; they would have no real power or authority. Some people hate the rich and some cops hate rich people and they want communism. Communism would work in its purest form if people were mere machines. Communism can’t work because people have different talents and skills, thus people can’t all be equal, or classless. Communism strips the power of the people; there is no freedom as all the media is censored, which in turn limits freedom of expression. What people need to understand is that there is idealistic communism, and then there is the reality: corrupt dictatorships posing as communism, which is in fact the opposite of the idealistic people’s rule. According the definition of communism by the man who coined the phrase, communism *is* stateless and classless. Most of people outside really scared of communism will go into the people mind and try to get rid of it.

Keywords: [“communism”,”people”,”work”]
Source: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-communism

CAPITALISM AND COMPASSION: a test of Milbrath

Summary – From his observations of environmentalists Milbrath extracts the generalization that there is something inimical between capitalism and compassion. Clearly, Milbrath believes that capitalism and altruistic compassion are fundamentally at odds with one-another. If capitalism and altruistic compassion are opposed, then it should follow that those who feel at home with capitalism and support it will be less altruistic and compassionate. In the subsequent 1983 State election voters had a 3-way choice — between a Leftist party and two conservative parties. There could be no doubt that a vote for the National party was a vote for capitalism. Conservatives who were less confident in the virtue of capitalism could vote for the Liberal party. The differential degree of altruism shown by the supporters of the three main parties in this election should therefore provide a fairly finely-tuned test of Milbrath’s hypothesis. If Milbrath is right, the National party voters should show especially low scores on the compassionate altruism scale and especially high scores on the `AO’ scale. RESULTS. The contrast of chief interest was thought to lie between the National party voters and the Labor party voters. National voters were significantly more ambitious and Labor voters were significantly more compassionate. Voters for the other conservative party showed mean scores on altruism almost identical to those of Labor voters and mean scores on achievement orientation almost identical to National voters. Many quite compassionate people vote in Queensland for a fanatical champion of capitalism.

Keywords: [“vote”,”party”,”CAPITALISM”]
Source: http://jonjayray.com/milbrath.html

compassionate capitalism Archives

That’s a small number, nearly insignificant, but if every company dedicated just 1% of its revenues and time to the community around it, the difference would be monumental. A business is not an island; it’s the product of the community it was formed in, and its enduring success is dependent on that same community. This idea is at odds with the way many companies do business. It’s accepted that many corporations are more concerned with profits than with the community or environment surrounding it. That’s enough to fix up a local park, keep a food pantry stocked for months, or divide between a few local charities. This practice doesn’t just take the cooperation of a few huge corporations; it takes small businesses, too. If enough small businesses joined together, donating a fraction of their revenue and some of their time, they could help prevent children from going hungry by sponsoring community gardens. They could clean up their neighborhoods and make their towns and cities a cleaner, safer place to live, or support a local animal shelter, or host workshops to teach career skills to local students or unemployed community members. They sound like such small things, but when all of these small things add up, they become an unstoppable movement of compassion and gratitude. There are also tangible benefits for businesses, such as an improved business profile as members of the community associate the business with its involvement. You may be just one person, or the leader of a small business. Even a small percentage can have a lasting positive effect on your surrounding area.

Keywords: [“community”,”small”,”business”]
Source: http://www.legendsleadershipconcepts.com/tag/compassionate-capitalism

Capitalism and compassion: Can they coexist? – SD Monitor News

In a free market, the bottom line is simply, the bottom line. Capitalism has become largely about self-interest, consumerism, sleight of hand and the bottom line. A person may be able to provide financially, but not emotionally – because the two systems are often disjointed. In a system that is profit driven, the raw material for intimacy and connection is rarely cultivated or valued. Fact is, business is personal, and sterilizing the brutal impacts of self-interested economics through such phraseology does not shelter us. Poverty has an impact on both physical and mental health. As the middle class founders and people blame themselves for their fiscal woes, which in turn may be associated with higher levels of stress, as well as depression, anxiety and maladaptive coping, the impacts of a system based solely on a bottom line which benefits a few appear to be bad for the mental health of many. Our economic and incentivization systems are a set-up for failure and disappointment for those who are the most vulnerable to experience the worst outcomes. The free market system has become the bellwether of myriad systems in our culture – educational, commercial, media, medical and spiritual. It becomes difficult to teach children empathy and emotional regulation when the system into which they are being acculturated does not value these qualities. Because the system does not equitably provide opportunity across all socioeconomic strata. As the cultural, economic and political needles move, so too does mental health.

Keywords: [“system”,”economic”,”impact”]
Source: https://sdmonitornews.com/2018/02/27/capitalism-and-compassion-can…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-10-2018

The Pursuit of Equal Income Distribution

During the last decades, the great weaknesses of capitalism have flourished. Inequality of income distribution has worsened painfully, the gap between rich and poor widens more and more every day, and just a few lucky entrepreneurs in the world are able to enjoy the capital benefits of the global system. Hunger, poverty, demographic explosion, ageing, and unbridled mass migration, among other factors, have become critical social dilemmas directly related to capitalist deviations, all of which cause us to foresee a chaotic world scenario in the near future. The numbers shown in this article confirm that the world’s economic disparity, instead of diminishing, is increasing at an alarming rate. Since the world economy completely depends on capitalism, this system is still extremely powerful and influential in global decision-making, thus further aggravating economic disparity. As it is not possible to avoid the capitalist system, we will make proposals that are feasible for implementing within the current capitalist tendencies in order to alleviate global imbalance. Compassionate Capitalism is an alternative that promotes flexibilization of the system in order to make it more sustainable. It seeks to diminish corporate control over the economy and markets by regaining the State’s economic intervention so that profits are fairly redistributed for the common welfare. The information used for the study is based on the most recent international reports and global circumstances of the topics in question. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To make sure that you can receive messages from us, please add ‘julypress.com’ domain to your e-mail ‘safe list’. If you do not receive e-mail in your ‘inbox’, check your ‘bulk mail’ or ‘junk mail’ folders.

Keywords: [“system”,”global”,”world”]
Source: http://journal.julypress.com/index.php/ajsss/article/view/262

Two-faced capitalism

Good corporate citizenship is a theme of the Davos celebrations. Admittedly, even fewer, just 5%, named CSR in its own right as the single most important criterion; but one might add to this the additional 24% who said that the reputation and integrity of the brand, to which good corporate citizenship presumably contributes, matter most. From an ethical point of view, the problem with conscientious CSR is obvious: it is philanthropy at other people’s expense. Advocates of CSR typically respond that this misses the point: corporate virtue is good for profits. The trouble is, CSR that pays dividends, so to speak, is unlikely to impress the people whose complaints first put CSR on the board’s agenda. Profit-maximising CSR does not silence the critics, which was the initial aim; CSR that is not profit-maximising might silence the critics but is unethical. In a new book, co-written with Karen Southwick, Mr Benioff argues that corporate philanthropy, done right, transforms the culture of the firm concerned*. Unlike some advocates of CSR, Mr Benioff says he opposes government mandates to undertake such activities. In any case, if Mr Benioff is right, and CSR done wisely helps businesses succeed, compulsion should not be needed. Lack of compulsion is exactly what is wrong with current approaches to CSR, say many of the NGOs that first put firms on the spot for their supposedly unethical practices. CSR was conjured up in the first place because government action was deemed inadequate: orthodox politics was a sham, so pressure had to be put directly on firms by organised protest. Ten years on, instead of declaring victory, as well they might, disenchanted NGOs like Christian Aid are coming to regard CSR as the greater sham, and are calling on governments to resume their duties.

Keywords: [“CSR”,”corporate”,”firm”]
Source: https://www.economist.com/node/2369912

compassionate capitalism

Over the years, Mr. Whittaker’s Christian ecumenical humanitarian organization, Opportunity International, has lived up to its growing reputation of giving the poor an alternative to charity. Today, this non-profit group creates entrepreneurial empowerment by providing loans and job training directly to poor people at the grassroots level. By 2007, the organization plans to finance 1 million poor entrepreneurs per year; and by 2010 its goal is to finance 2 million people per year into their own businesses. 98 percent of its clients pay their loans back on time and at market-rate interest! Notions that the poor are not creditworthy are shattered by this reality. Given access to credit and capital, capitalism can be democratized. People must be able to feed themselves and their families. For the majority of the world’s hungry people, food is available. Microfinance is the jumpstart so many people need to begin the process of meeting their most basic human needs; and then, accumulated capital can be saved and invested towards purchasing a home and property to begin the process of real wealth-building. When people are economically deprived, they can be politically and culturally deprived as well. We also know that poverty represents a breeding ground for terrorism, emanating from people’s feelings of desperation. The bottom line is that we must do more to narrow that gap between the rich and poor in our world. When we tap into one of the key economic forces that have made America great, namely, venture capital to energize the spirit of entrepreneurship, and harness it with compassion in the form of credit for the working poor – we have a formula for ending chronic poverty.

Keywords: [“people”,”poor”,”property”]
Source: https://steveparkhurst.wordpress.com/tag/compassionate-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-06-2018

Jordan Peterson & Fascist Mysticism

12 Rules for Life is only Peterson’s second book in twenty years. Packaged for people brought up on BuzzFeed listicles, Peterson’s brand of intellectual populism has risen with stunning velocity; and it is boosted, like the political populisms of our time, by predominantly male and frenzied followers, who seem ever-ready to pummel his critics on social media. Peterson diagnoses this crisis as a loss of faith in old verities. Closer examination reveals Peterson’s ageless insights as a typical, if not archetypal, product of our own times: right-wing pieties seductively mythologized for our current lost generations. In all respects, Peterson’s ancient wisdom is unmistakably modern. These neo-romantics were responding, in the same way as Peterson, to an urgent need, springing from a traumatic experience of social and economic modernity, to believe-in whatever reassures and comforts. Peterson’s own lineage among these healers of modern man’s soul can be traced through his repeatedly invoked influences: not only Carl Jung, but also Mircea Eliade, the Romanian scholar of religion, and Joseph Campbell, a professor at Sarah Lawrence College, who, like Peterson, combined a conventional academic career with mass-market musings on heroic individuals. Peterson seems to have modelled his public persona on Jung rather than Campbell. Peterson may seem the latest in a long line of eggheads pretentiously but harmlessly romancing the noble savage. Peterson’s revered mentor, was a zealous Russian expansionist, who denounced Ukraine’s independence and hailed Vladimir Putin as the right man to lead Russia’s overdue regeneration. Nowhere in his published writings does Peterson reckon with the moral fiascos of his gurus and their political ramifications; he seems unbothered by the fact that thinking of human relations in such terms as dominance and hierarchy connects too easily with such nascent viciousness such as misogyny, anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. Like Peterson, many of these hyper-masculinist thinkers saw compassion as a vice and urged insecure men to harden their hearts against the weak on the grounds that the latter were biologically and culturally inferior.

Keywords: [“Peterson”,”intellectual”,”Jung”]
Source: http://nybooks.com/daily/2018/03/19/jordan-peterson-and-fascist-mysticism

Quotations about or by Capitalism

The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries. Women’s sexy underwear is a minor but significant growth industry of late-twentieth-century Britain in the twilight of capitalism. The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries. It is impossible for capitalism to survive, primarily because the system of capitalism needs some blood to suck. Years later, Amanda used the woodpecker experiment as a model for understanding capitalism, Communism, Christianity, and all other systems that traffic in future rewards rather than in present realities. Feminism is a socialist, anti-family, political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians. Capitalism is a system in which the central institutions of society are in principle under autocratic control. If the world is lucky enough to enjoy peace, it may even one day make the discovery, to the horror of doctrinaire free-enterprisers and doctrinaire planners alike, that what is called capitalism and what is called socialism are both capable of working quite well. Predatory capitalism created a complex industrial system and an advanced technology; it permitted a considerable extension of democratic practice and fostered certain liberal values, but within limits that are now being pressed and must be overcome. Under capitalism man exploits man under socialism the reverse is true. The problem with capitalism is that it best rewards the worst part of us: the ruthless, competitive, cunning, opportunistic, aquisitive drives, giving little reward and often much punishment – or at least much handicap – to honesty, compassion, fair play, many forms of hard work, love of justice, and a concern for those in need. All fingers are not alike, If you cut bigger ones to make all equal it is communism, If you stretch smaller ones to make all equal it is socialism, If you do nothing to make all equal it is capitalism.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”system”,”call”]
Source: https://www.poetrysoup.com/quotes/capitalism

Compassionate Capitalist Online Radio

Karen Rands, a true Venture Catalyst, shares her insights about Connecting Companies with Capital and Capital with Companies. This show engages the Early Stage Sophisticated Investor and Angel Investor Community and inspiring Entrepreneurs as a source for info of interest to both investors and entrepreneurs. Become a loyal listener and spread the word to business owners and investors you know! Karen as a presenter, author, and CEO has been involved in the early stage private equity space since 2001. When Karen speaks, people listen to what she has to say about creating wealth through entrepreneurship and private investment! Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives.

Keywords: [“company”,”Karen”,”Investor”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-31-2018

Compassionate Capitalist Coffee Break – Seed Stage Investors

Forget compassionate capitalism, just some fairness will do

Saving Capitalism by Robert Reich could have ended up being the usual rant against the excesses of capitalism and capitalists. His argument that large companies in collusion with regulators and government officials have exploited the free market system for massive personal gains comes with the force of his personal experience as secretary of labour in the Clinton administration, as well as reams of relevant data. Osvald Bjelland founded and runs Xynteo, an Oslo-based consulting firm that advises companies on how doing good for society can be good for their bottom lines as well. As a serial entrepreneur who sold an earlier start-up to Citibank, it does sound strange for him to be critical of the capitalist system. Finally, over the weekend, N.R. Narayana Murthy, co-founder of Infosys, one of India’s most influential entrepreneurs and a poster boy for how capitalism can spawn a thousand millionaires, led some of the company’s founders in abstaining from voting in favour of a board proposal to hike the salary of the company’s chief operating officer U.B. Pravin Rao by 35% to Rs12.5 crore. Reich is even more critical of the system that served the US and most of Western society for well over a century. Before the current round of hand-wringing against capitalism took wing, the system did deliver incredible growth to all those countries that adopted Adam Smith’s laissez faire doctrine. In a country like India where for centuries, two meals a day was the ambition of millions, today people demand a share of the wealth they are helping create for the companies they work in. The virtual defanging of unions, the unholy nexus between government and big business, and above all the limitless greed of a select few for more power, have all contributed to the prevailing angst about the existing rules of business. Now as more and more of those who may have been its biggest beneficiaries declare that it is broken, the need to fix it, is acquiring urgency. Perhaps it is too much to expect compassion from a system that is inherently Darwinian. We will settle for a fairer and more just arrangement.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”companies”]
Source: https://www.livemint.com/Opinion/K6RVjtcr1QX0DAQFvJZg6O/Forget-compassionate-capitalism-just-some-fairness-will-do.html

The Free-Market Fantasy

Instead of trying to get a handout from the government or make a quick buck on the stock market, Mackey says that companies need to roll up their sleeves and rethink how to run a business. Today, the dominant discourse governing discussion of markets, states, and companies is neoliberalism, and Mackey’s free-market business model and historical narrative fit neatly within this framework. As economic historian Karl Polanyi argued decades ago, capitalist markets are a product of state engineering, not nature. The history of industrial development in the United States, often considered the epicenter of free markets, demonstrates the political nature of markets. The history of market formation in the United States reveals an industrial structure supplied by goods and capital extracted from slave labor and facilitated through a state-sponsored, genocidal land grab. Far-reaching government legislation protected domestic markets and infant industries from external competition, and federal and state governments played a central role in the development of physical infrastructure and the creation of huge bodies of agricultural and industrial knowledge – all essential elements in the genesis of American industrial capitalism. At the same time, society’s greatest inventions and innovations of the past two hundred years – rockets to the moon, penicillin, computers, the Internet – were not bestowed upon us by lone entrepreneurs and firms operating in free markets under conditions of healthy competition. Companies produce influential innovations, but so do other institutions that operate outside the confines of the profit motive, competitive markets, and the bottom line. Designating the market as natural and the state as unnatural is a convenient fiction for those wedded to the status quo. The complexion of those markets depends on the balance of class forces at any given point in time. Free markets don’t exist and other institutions like states clearly matter. Free markets don’t exist, but maybe corporations are still the best, most sensible, way to heal the planet.

Keywords: [“Market”,”capitalism”,”Mackey”]
Source: https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/04/free-market-conscious-capitalism-government/

Even Stevens Makes Capitalism-With-a-Cause Work

Addressing nationwide food insecurity while creating a thriving restaurant business should be a Herculean task, but Michael McHenry tackles formidable projects several times a week. As the president of Even Stevens Sandwiches, McHenry exudes an unfailing optimism that’s carried the hip sandwich shop to six states with 20 locations-with many more scheduled to open in 2018. Craft sandwiches, a local vibe and a charitable cause have propelled Even Stevens to build an organization that employs hundreds and serves millions. Even Stevens opened its first location in downtown Salt Lake City in 2014 and introduced the concept of donating one sandwich for every sandwich sold. McHenry has an extensive background in the restaurant industry. He worked for 15 years in brand development, concept and operational performance before partnering with Even Stevens owner Steve Down to create the first restaurant in the industry that can correlate revenue with social impact. It took less than three years to sell and donate a million sandwiches, and by the end of 2017, Even Stevens had donated over two million sandwiches to more than 70 nonprofit organizations. The organizations place the order, often a $2,500 value, and the food is drop-shipped to the door with Even Stevens picking up the bill. Following a close second to the compassionate capitalism aspect of Even Stevens is McHenry’s enthusiasm for team development. Even Stevens donates around 100,000 sandwiches a month, and McHenry says overcoming challenges has contributed to the ongoing success of the brand. Each of the eight Even Stevens locations in Utah works with merchants from that area to provide a catalyst for the business community. McHenry says his job is to be a voice for social change, to find artisans in the food industry, to partner with nonprofits that are tackling food insecurity, and to find new neighborhoods where the sandwich shop can create a sustained impact.

Keywords: [“McHenry”,”Even”,”Stevens”]
Source: https://utahbusiness.com/even-stevens-shows-make-capitalism-cause-enterprises-work/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-29-2018

A Christmas Carol Themes

The financial success that Scrooge enjoyed is precisely the goal of capitalism, but a fixation on the accumulation of wealth seduced Scrooge into seeing every aspect of life in such terms. Not only Christmas, but his fiancé, his dying friend and business partner, his reputation, his office staff, and his only living family member are all weighed against their financial cost and found unworthy. The costs of such selfishness and bitterness are not borne by Scrooge alone, however. Dickens’s portrayal of the social costs-prisons, workhouses, increased mortality, the creation of ghettos and slums, the miserable state of both wealthy and poor alike-clearly makes a case for morality and social justice on a larger scale. The world becomes a better place almost immediately following Scrooge’s conversion. The story implies that a renewed connection to humanity is the very essence of redemption. Though the Christmas setting invites a traditional Christian interpretation of Scrooge’s redemption, his change is rooted not in a commitment to deeper spirituality or orthodoxy but in an authentic connection to and investment in the lives of other human beings. While the results seem to change nothing about the social structure itself, the compassion shown by individual people changes the social relationships they share.

Keywords: [“social”,”Scrooge”,”Christmas”]
Source: https://www.enotes.com/topics/christmas-carol/themes

For Equal Rights by Sophie M. Gray

In the world of today, where you have a racist neo-nazi uprising in Europe, where Trump gets a free pass in saying racists slurs, and ISIS talks about global domination, I see history repeating itself – over and over again. I have over the years tried to understand what it is that gets millions of people to follow such a man and do horrible unthinkable things. I wanted to understand how it was possible for this one man to convince millions to believe his own reality and perception, acting on his beliefs, and follow him blindly. I came to realise that Hitler is not the only one with this power, and this is why history keeps repeating itself. In all cases they use fear to recruit more into their movement and convince them about the cause, a cause they would die and kill for. Fear is a powerful emotion, and from there comes hate. A lot of this fear comes from lack of knowledge, the fear of the unknown. Leaders that preach war and hate use fear to reach their goals and start movements. With fear they make people believe their cause, and with fear they win. Our strongest tool against these movements is knowledge and critical thinking. That is how we stop governments cheating us, companies abusing us, global wars and bullies. We have therefore the obligation to each other to spread knowledge – not fear.

Keywords: [“fear”,”over”,”knowledge”]
Source: https://forequalrights.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

discordion {Artist Ian Pritchard}

Here’s the list of companies that took advantage of taxpayer-funded workers courtesy of the DWP. Feel free to use the information in whatever way you see fit. The Tory government has been forced to reveal a vast list of firms that hoovered up free labour from benefit claimants after spending four years trying to keep it a secret. Poundstretcher, Tesco, Asda and Morrisons are among more than 500 companies, charities and councils named as having used Mandatory Work Activity. Others on the list from 2011 included payday loans firm Cash Converters, chicken diner Nando’s, WH Smith, Superdrug and DHL. More than 100,000 jobseekers were put on the hated ‘workfare’ scheme, which forced them to work 30-hour weeks unpaid for a month each or have their benefits docked. The Department for Work and Pensions mounted an astonishing and costly legal battle to keep the firms’ names a secret. The DWP stood its ground for nearly four years despite being overruled by the Information Commissioner watchdog in August 2012. The saga finally ended at the Court of Appeal on Wednesday – where a trio of top judges threw out the DWP’s argument by a 2-1 vote. Campaigners and Labour condemned the vast cost of the cover-up – in which taxpayers had to fund lawyers for both the DWP and ICO..

Keywords: [“Work”,”DWP”,”firm”]
Source: https://discordion.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

Mental wellbeing, capitalism and fluminism. Notes.

Photo by me On social media, I read of a woman who recently experienced rejection from mental health services during a crisis of severe distress and suicidal thoughts. I know something of the absolute fear and isolation suffered during times of severe distress and suicidal thoughts. Humans are biologically social beings, yet our social foundations have been shaken to the core. Families and institutional service providers have been hammered by the pressures of a failing economic system ~ Neoliberal Capitalism. A globalised machine based on competition rides roughshod over mental wellbeing. Tensions manifest directly upon loving and supporting relationships, right across the globe. Humans are biologically responding to internal and external stimuli. The externals are largely ignored in our systems of care. Even the monetisation of nature is being forced at a pace, adopted by advocates of a growth-oriented market system dominated by corporate interests. Lives are worn down and snuffed out by competitive examinations, interviews, PIPS, job markets, mortgage payments, rents, bills, the weekly shop. I will not accept all-out competition is the god-given ‘natural state’ of human existence. We can perpetuate and proliferate positive interconnections between all living beings.

Keywords: [“human”,”system”,”market”]
Source: https://seasonalight.wordpress.com/2018/01/06/mental-wellbeing…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-20-2018

The Case For Compassionate Capitalism

To save capitalism from itself, FDR introduced what turned out to be the crucial missing ingredient: compassion. The damage done to the country during the Depression convinced him that unregulated capitalism always favors the rich at the expense of everyone else. So to save capitalism from itself, FDR introduced what turned out to be the crucial missing ingredient: compassion. Compassionate capitalism worked for everyone without busting the federal budget. Under Roosevelt’s compassionate capitalism – even with a Great Depression and a Second World War – the federal budget quickly came right back into balance. By the time Eisenhower was elected, compassionate capitalism was tightly woven into the fabric of American democracy. America’s social safety net was never viewed as the cause of eye-popping deficits until a radical group of political nihilists decided that the best way to kill the compassion in capitalism was to stubbornly refuse to pay for it. The reason compassionate capitalism is still hugely popular – Tea Party extremists notwithstanding – is because it works. America’s social safety net was never viewed as the cause of eye-popping deficits until a radical group of political nihilists, led by people like Grover Norquist, decided that the best way to kill the compassion in capitalism was to stubbornly refuse to pay for it – and then blame the resulting deficits on the lie that compassion itself is just too damn expensive. History has repeatedly demonstrated that compassionate capitalism leads to balanced budgets, a robust economy, and a piece of the opportunity pie for every citizen seated at America’s table.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”deficit”,”America”]
Source: http://cognoscenti.legacy.wbur.org/2013/03/21/nick-paleologos

Libertarian Propaganda With Your Organic Arugula? – Mother Jones

If you shop at Whole Foods, you’ve probably seen the ads at the cash register for Conscious Capitalism. To give Mackey his due, he proved that many shoppers are willing to pay a premium for foods that are healthy, sustainably produced, and sold by workers who earn decent wages and health benefits. Reading between the lines you gradually get the sense that Mackey not only fears bad government, but also the one we have right now. If CEOs just did a little bit better job of looking out for the interests of their workers, their suppliers, and the environment, then government regulators and tax collectors could basically pack up and go home. We’d be left with a sort of enlightened corporatocracy in which people like Mackey would lead the way. At times, Mackey reveals a pathetic lack of consciousness for someone writing a book about it. If the dream world that Mackey paints in Conscious Capitalism inspires a few more CEOs to allow bathroom breaks in their sweatshops or spare some old-growth hardwoods in Borneo, then he has accomplished something. Conscious Capitalism could have been an interesting read if Mackey had chosen to pull back the curtain. He could speak frankly about some of the trade-offs that he made in order to popularize organic foods. For better or worse, Mackey has been thrust into a position of leadership that transcends the particulars of selling sustainably caught cod and organic kombucha: Whole Foods beat out other natural foods chains to dominate the market, and with that dominance comes an increasing duty to represent his politically minded customers in causes that they care about.

Keywords: [“Mackey”,”Capitalism”,”write”]
Source: https://www.motherjones.com/food/2013/01/whole-foods-john-mackey…

Natural Capitalism – Mother Jones

Today, more people are chasing fewer natural resources. Industry still operates by the same rules, using more resources to make fewer people more productive. As businesses successfully created more goods and jobs, consumer demand soared, compounding the destruction of natural capital. If the competitive advantage goes to the low-cost provider, and resources are cheap, then business will naturally use more and more resources in order to maximize worker productivity. Our thinking is backward: We shouldn’t use more of what we have less of to use less of what we have more of. In the United States, those who are employed, and presumably becoming more productive, find they are working 100 to 200 hours more per year than 20 years ago. In some cases – wind power, for example – the technologies not only operate more efficiently and pollute less, they also are more labor-intensive. This is what it promises: an economy that uses progressively less material and energy each year and where the quality of consumer services continues to improve; an economy where environmental deterioration stops and gets reversed as we invest in increasing our natural capital; and, finally, a society where we have more useful and worthy work available than people to do it. Natural capitalism may not guarantee particular outcomes, but it will ensure that economic systems more closely mimic biological systems, which have successfully adapted to dynamic changes over millennia. Almost perfectly with what American voters say they want: better schools,a better environment, safer communities, more economic security, stronger.

Keywords: [“more”,”resource”,”system”]
Source: https://www.motherjones.com/politics/1997/03/natural-capitalism

Capitalism, Compassion, and The Prisoner’s Dilemma

From a strictly rational, individualistic perspective, the choice is clear. This choice results in a 50/50 chance between a 5 year sentence and complete freedom, depending on the choice of the other prisoner, while cooperation would result in, at best, a six month sentence, and a 10 year sentence at worst. No matter what the other player does, one player will always gain by defecting. All things being equal, all rational players should choose defect. Now, I’m no expert on game theory, but what struck me in class when we were going over this was the fact that, although the clear rational choice for each individual player is to defect, a situation in which both players make this choice is clearly not the optimal outcome if we look at the game as a whole. Being a non-zero-sum game, the sum of both players’ gains, less their losses, need not return to zero, nor be equal in every possible outcome. Any instance in which one player chooses defect will result in a total of ten years of prison time, split either five-five or ten-zero. If both players cooperate a total of only one year, six months for each player, must be served. According to traditional game theory, cooperation is only a viable choice if the game is repeated an infinite or random number of times, as only then will the possible threat of punishment outweigh the potential for success with defection. If rather than considering only one’s own well-being, we look at that of both prisoners, taking into account the total effect of one’s choice, cooperation would be the only acceptable option for the compassionate player.

Keywords: [“plays”,”choice”,”game”]
Source: https://rossheutmaker.wordpress.com/2009/04/10/capitalism…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-18-2018

Encore: Taming Capitalism Run Wild

For the majority of people, capitalism is not delivering the goods. The very wealthy getting a trivial increase in taxes while the payroll tax of working people will go from 4.2 percent to 6.2 percent. So you’ve taken the folks at the bottom, the people who work hard, full-time jobs, and you’ve made their economic condition worse over a 50-year period, while wealth has accumulated at the top. If the 15 million, that’s the estimate of the White House, the 15 million American workers whose wages will go up if we raise the minimum wage, we have to count also, the question, those people will now have a higher income. To develop abstract theories of how economics works to make it all like it’s a stable, equilibrium that meets people’s needs in an optimal way. That’s useless to people who want to learn how to run a business, because it’s a fantasy. Those people teach you how the economy actually works and how you’ll have to make decisions if you’re going to run a business. RICHARD WOLFF: You know, but you know, capitalism- I like to say to people, capitalism, like all systems, when it comes into being, is born a few hundred years ago in Europe and spreads around the world, like other systems before it. BILL MOYERS: The organization she co-founded, Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, is fighting to improve wages and working conditions for the people who cook and serve the food we eat at restaurants and then clean up when we’re done. These workers earn poverty wages because the minimum wage for tipped workers at the federal level has been frozen for 22 years at $2.13 an hour, and it’s the reason that food servers use food stamps at double the rate of the rest of the U.S. workforce, and have a poverty rate of three times the rest of the U.S. workforce.

Keywords: [“people”,”Work”,”system”]
Source: http://billmoyers.com/episode/encore-taming-capitalism-run-wild-2

Compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf

Compassionate Capitalism spells compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf clearly and pdv the guiding principles and concrete steps to making your life and your world better. I compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf it so much. He not only helped create one of The simple act of offering core java black book nageshwar rao pdf kind word or two can have power to change lives in positive and profound ways. Compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf It was created dompassionate celebrate the 81 years of discerning, thoughtful criticism Kirkus Reviews has contributed to both the publishing industry and readers at large. A good example of this is the network marketing industry where one capitaljsm success is built on the compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf of other people. Please keep in mind that all comments are moderated according to our comment policy, and all links compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf nofollow. Rich de Vos completes the idea formulated by Adam Smith compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf his book, using their knowledge about the human nature, and the book is full of examples. He demonstrates that compassionate capitalism is the only capotalism to the most crucial issues of our time, and to the many other challenges that face us in the closing decade of pc optimizer pro 6.1.4.5 keygen century and in the beginning of the next. Download Free eBook Now! Whenever getting this kind of responses and details through end users with regards to the Devos Rich : Compassionate Capitalism Author Rich DeVos, we rkch the woman’s compassionate capitalism rich devos pdf at. Interweaving his own amazing story with vivid personal histories of capitwlism and women around the world, Rich DeVos illustrates both how success is achieved and what it truly means.

Keywords: [“DeVos”,”rich”,”Capitalism”]
Source: http://thefilesiwant.com/cat17/compassionate-capitalism-rich-devos-pdf.php

Understanding the debate around ‘compassionate capitalism’

The debate on corporate salaries, which has raged for long in both India and the West, is complex. As the West debated unconscionably high executive salaries and compensation, the fabled investor Warren Buffett observed that the way to get fatcat corporates to change was to embarrass them. Since Sikka made his announcement on August 18, a wider debate has raged over whether a founder who has stepped down and is not a dominant shareholder, ought to indulge in the kind of public campaign that NRN mounted – rather than making an unambiguous choice between total detachment and committing himself to addressing Infy’s challenges as part of the board. The debate has also touched on issues of conformity to a company’s core cultural values and ethos. Murthy has flagged the issue of distributive justice in corporate India – the widening gap between the top earners and the bulk of those lower down, especially at a time when the economy is slowing. Compensation for the top deck has continued to soar higher above the company median in some of India’s celebrated private banks – at least one of which, interestingly, had an Infy-like culture of granting stock until some years ago. In his annual letter to shareholders in 2006, Buffett made the point that compensation reform will only occur if the largest institutional shareholders demand a fresh look at the system. In India, the largest shareholder is LIC, which is owned by the government. That’s the question shareholders – especially institutional shareholders – must put to those on the boards and the compensation and audit committees of many Indian firms. Understanding the debate around ‘compassionate capitalism’ Narayana Murthy’s constant battle for ‘democratisation of wealth’ reached a flashpoint last week.

Keywords: [“shareholder”,”company”,”India”]
Source: http://dishalokseva.com/understanding-debate-around-compassionate-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-06-2018

Jeb Bush’s Brilliant Defense of Capitalism

When Jeb Bush talks about the statists, I never thought I’d see the day. I never thought I would see the day – and Jeb Bush is with the Republican establishment. Everybody is the same, everybody is equal, except the people at the top and we’re gonna cream ’em, we’re gonna nail ’em and we’re gonna cut ’em down to size, and in the process of cutting everybody at the top down to size, look at what you’re gonna end up with. The only people who should suffer consequences are the rich, and we’ll define that as $150,000 a year or more. That’s what the statists say, people such as Obama. That’s what we conservatives believe, because we conservatives believe that no two people or things are equal; it’s not possible. Of course, that’s not what Jeb Bush or anybody else who professes all this actually means. BREAK TRANSCRIPT. RUSH: I have to tell you, Jeb Bush sounds like me. Jeb Bush in his own words is taking half the message that I take out when I go to do a Rush to Excellence appearance. Steve Moore doesn’t go on Fox and throw out the possibility of Jeb Bush throwing his hat in the ring and point out that nobody’s getting over 30% in our primary, but a lot of people are thinking the same thing somewhere.

Keywords: [“people”,”Jeb”,”Bush”]
Source: https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2011/12/19/jeb_bush_s_brilliant…

Capitalism Vs Communism Vs Socialism Vs Compassionate Capitalism

Capitalism and Communism are not a political system. What communism in its purest form does is it tries to suppress this induvidualistic brilliance and tries to turn it into a mass mediocrity where every one has the same level of output and reward. Having said this I will not attribute the fall of communism to this flaw alone. It was due to the tyrannical rulers and dictators who modified communism to their whims and fancies. You can take all communist leaders all the leaders are guilty of suppressing any independent thought and murdering their own people, a perfect recipie for a riegn of terror. In the entire History of India we never had an Iota of communism as we were seeped in feudal mindset and caste system. If you take the dravidian movement which opposed this system it still supported the individual brilliance but it only opposed the subjugation of one set of people by another. We need to have separate systems for Social System and Economic System. Capitalism is not a panacea for all ills,infact it is not even a well defined boundary of thinking. Politically India was a democracy and people were free to express their views except in Emergency.

Keywords: [“system”,”Communism”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://aliensofnec.wordpress.com/2007/12/10/capitalism-vs…

Facebook Injects Buddhism Into Business

Facebook is experimenting with ways to make the site a little more compassionate. It’s no secret that Facebook can serve as a platform for bullying. Cyber bullying occurs on Facebook more than any other site, according to a study last year by Internet security company McAfee. It turns out that 92% of the teenagers surveyed have witnessed bullying on Facebook. In Facebook’s earlier days, the tools for reporting malicious behavior were subpar. So back in 2010, Facebook Engineering Director Arturo Bejar decided to do something about it, Noah Shachtman of Wired reports. After attending a talk about kindness at the Wisdom 2.0 conference, Bejar felt inspired to implement compassion into the core of Facebook’s business. They suggested Facebook make its reporting tools more personal, conversational, and emotional. The changes were small at first, but they ultimately increased usage by 30%. Later changes included more personalized messages and even culture-specific pleas. The basis of Buddhist compassion is that we’re all interconnected, and as Shactman notes, there’s no other place where that is more obvious than on Facebook.

Keywords: [“Facebook”,”more”,”compassion”]
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-injects-buddhism-into-business-2013-6

Political Scientist, Anti-War Activist, Philosopher, Sociologist, Literary Critic, Journalist, Educator, Scholar, Economist

Max Weber was a 19th-century German sociologist and one of the founders of modern sociology. Born in Germany in 1864, Max Weber was a precocious child. Still, their house was full of prominent intellectuals and lively discourse, an environment in which Weber thrived. After graduating from high school, Weber studied law, history, philosophy and economics for three semesters at Heidelberg University before spending a year in the military. Weber married a distant cousin, Marianne Schnitger, in 1893. After his father died in 1897, Weber suffered a mental breakdown. When Weber was finally able to resume working in 1903, he became an editor at a prominent social science journal. After a stint volunteering in the medical service during World War I, Weber published three more books on religion in a sociological context. These works, The Religion of China, The Religion of India and Ancient Judaism, contrasted their respective religions and cultures with that of the Western world by weighing the importance of economic and religious factors, among others, on historical outcomes. Weber’s writing helped form the basis of modern sociology.

Keywords: [“Weber”,”religion”,”publish”]
Source: https://www.biography.com/people/max-weber-9526066

Profits with a Purpose

To reintroduce myself and the purpose of this blog- my name is Katie and I’m a senior journalism student at UNC-CH. This semester, I’m studying Conscious Capitalism and how it’s been changing free-enterprise capitalism as a whole. I’ve begun reading the Whole Foods co-founder John Mackey and Raj Sisodia’s book Conscious Capitalism. These are businesses with conscious leaders who care about their people and the company’s purpose. Conscious businesses understand that stakeholders really matter. The store was eight feet underwater-all the equipment and inventory in the store were destroyed. Mackey recalls the unexpected happening-dozens of customers and neighbors came to the store to help clean and fix the store. The support from other stakeholders was remarkable- even suppliers offered to resupply Whole Foods on credit. Because of this support, Whole Foods was able to successfully reopen. Whole Foods is not alone as a conscious business that creates multiple kinds of value and well-being for all stakeholders. Next time, I’ll discuss what Conscious Capitalism is not.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”Capitalism”,”stakeholders”]
Source: https://profitswithapurpose.wordpress.com/tag/whole-foods

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-24-2018

CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW

Firstly, the postulation that aspects of socialist theory to a certain extent chime in harmony with biblical teaching and aligns with the way we often picture the New Testament church. Secondly, a question – why does the conservative, evangelical church tend to lean towards those promoting a capitalist agenda? Coming onto the second point, the conservative evangelical church does tend towards capitalism, despite that fact that it has many, many serious flaws. Conservative Christians, have always seen the great threat to stable society posed by liberal morality and have reacted against it, often perhaps without noticing that the underlying principles of left-of-centre politics are more compassionate and aligned with biblical teaching. Equally, in focusing on the morally conservative politics that have often gone hand in hand with capitalist economic policy, it is easy to ignore the great problems that capitalism brings, making the poor poorer, the rich richer and concentrating power in the hands of an elite few who are only concerned about themselves – think of Jesus’s teaching about the rich fool. I’ve suggested positives of socialist theory and negatives of capitalism. To be fair, this is not to say that socialist theory does not have major problems or capitalism benefits. You are causing the rest of the church a great deal of harm. In the hands of evil men, socialism is evil, in the hands of evil men, capitalism is also evil. Should we bury our heads in the sand, hide behind our closed church doors and avoid the ballot box? Certainly not.

Keywords: [“church”,”Capitalism”,”socialist”]
Source: https://jpschristianworldview.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism

The other day Russian President Vladimir Putin who is the longest ruling person in Russia after Ivan the Great and Stalin called America “a parasite of world economy.” Well, all communists say so but we have to ask China if they really believe it at heart or they wouldn’t have had the rapid growth they are having for last few years. Capitalism which is based on free enterprise system in America has been the reason behind the great success achieved by America since its birth. My personal experience with free enterprise system goes back to over 5 years ago when I got involved in a business opportunity where I could create an unlimited income with my sweat equity. To tell you the truth, the first year I failed miserably. This is what free enterprise system of America means to me where anybody from any background can work hard, create opportunity and determine their own destiny. People come to America looking for an opportunity like the one I just mentioned. That’s why, in America we say “No more Cheesecrackers.” A little better than capitalism is “Compassionate Capitalism,” a phrase recently coined which is not about “Money getting” but about “Serving people” because law of success is service and biggest businesses are now realizing it more now than ever. Many analysts still consider America to be in a recession period but few businesses seem to be sky rocketing even in this market. The basic motto of free enterprise system is that law of success is service and greatest server is the greatest leader.

Keywords: [“America”,”own”,”year”]
Source: http://thenewyorkcitypost.com/compassionate-capitalism

Anti-capitalism vs Post-capitalism

Capitalism, like all words that evoke emotions, has as many definitions as there are proponents or discontents. The Market Libertarian definition, to which we can also count the Objectivist definition, is that capitalism is productive human action, free individuals that agree on whether they want to buy or sell products and services on a free market. Capitalism in short is individuals making free decisions. The Marxist definition is that capitalism is a specific system of production, based around a hierarchical concentration of wealth and power. What separates Capitalism from Feudalism is that while Feudalism is centered around Land, Capitalism is centered around Capital – the concentration of possessions. Capitalism will eventually, according to Marx and Engels, have so many contradictions that it will lead to an inevitable worker’s revolution and a system based on the dictatorship of the proletariat, which will develop into a classless society where all the means of production are owned collectively by the people. The Cosmology of the EOS. What is Capitalism, according to the EOS? What we can say for certain is that Capitalism will be replaced within the next two centuries, and that there are three possible scenarios for how it can evolve into something else. Post-capitalism is whatever system of production and distribution that succeeds Capitalism. We don’t owe Capitalism to let it continue to exist only because it allowed an unprecedented standard of life in the western world during the 20th century.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”society”]
Source: https://eoshorizon.wordpress.com/2014/10/30/anti-capitalism-vs…

Neoliberal Capitalism, Emotion and Morality – States, Power, Emotion

Neoliberalism does not however, as some have claimed, have its own moral framework. For sure, the advancement of a neoliberal political economic agenda relies on an illusion of moral unity in fabricating claims about the ‘public good’, ‘fairness’, and ‘justice’. Neoliberalism is not a moral project, but an emotional project. Acknowledging the role of culture is not the same as implying neoliberalism has a supporting moral order despite the likes of Thatcher and others attempting to persuade us that it does. Neoliberalism ‘has morals’ to the extent that it has moral interests – but this is a contradiction-in-terms or a misnomer. Such as morality is not imposed from on high: it is deliberative and relatively spontaneous; it is a debated morality not simple moralizing. For Durkheim ideas that promoted particular group interests at the expense of others are not moral but were merely interests with associated habits and ways of seeing and doing that jeopardized collective solidarity, compassion and understanding. So if the powerful do not govern on a moral basis what do they govern on? Of course, they share ‘worldview’s’, cultural outlooks and norms and values. It’s important to say these were deeply immoral acts of state and any wider support for such action speaks not so much to moral affinities between powerful and powerless groups as much as it does to emotional inflammations engineered by governments that sustain popular fears, hopes and anxieties. Capitalism is more a love [and hate] story than a moral one.

Keywords: [“moral”,”morality”,”interest”]
Source: https://emotionalstates.wordpress.com/2016/07/07/neoliberal…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-17-2018

Compassionate Capitalism-Part 3

Conscious Capitalism

Mindfulness in business, work, investment, and leadership-what’s up with all that? I can remember not that long ago when the mention of mindfulness practices in the boardroom or workplace was met with blank stares; now it’s all over the place. It amazes me how quickly it’s moved beyond the fad stage into the realm of best practices. Last week I watched Arianna Huffington talking about mindfulness and business on CNBC’s Squawk Box, featuring moving first person accounts by Aetna CEO John Bertolini and Harvard Business School’s Bill George. That was followed by a HuffPost Live broadcast about mindfulness and work that included our friend and mindful.org contributor Janice Marturano, head of the Institute for Mindful Leadership. Business and work are central to our lives, so I’m very pleased about this development. Our friend Jeff Klein, a leader in this area, tells us that you will be able to learn from CEOs who are actually doing it about how conscious businesses focus on their purpose beyond profit and include the aspirations of all the stakeholders, including employees, customers and the surrounding community. Also in the Bay Area on April 30, Stanford’s CCARE will be hosting a one-day conference on Compassion and Business, presenting research and best practices by leading experts and business leaders who have successfully implemented compassion-based programs in their organizations. It will include three of our favorite leaders in the mindfulness and business world: Chade-Meng Tan of Google and SIYLI, Scott Kriens of Jupiter Networks and the 1440 Foundation, and Chip Conley who developed the Joie de Vivre hospitality chain. Four investors who consistently beat the market over more than 25 years discuss their philosophy and strategies for investing and giving. As part of the discussion, our friend Jeff Walker will lead the panel in a discussion of their own unique strategies for personal development and how these strategies help them to live a more complete and fulfilled life.

Keywords: [“business”,”Mindfulness”,”lead”]
Source: https://www.mindful.org/conscious-capitalism

Why Is There Poverty? – Allan G. Johnson

More than one out of every six people in the United States lives in poverty or near-poverty. With a majority of the people competing over what’s left to them by the elite, it’s inevitable that a substantial number of people are going to wind up on the short end and living in poverty or with the fear of it much of the time. In part poverty exists because the economic system is organized in ways that encourage the accumulation of wealth at one end and creates conditions of scarcity that make poverty inevitable at the other. If we’re interested in doing something about poverty itself – if we want a society largely free of impoverished citizens – then we’ll have to do something about both the system people participate in and how they participate in it. Learning to run faster may keep you or me out of poverty, but it won’t get rid of poverty itself. People can argue about whether chronic widespread poverty is morally acceptable or what an acceptable level of inequality might look like. If we want to understand where poverty comes from, what makes it such a stubborn feature of social life, we have to begin with the simple sociological fact that patterns of inequality result as much from how social systems are organized as they do from how individuals participate in them. The result is that some people rise out of poverty by improving their competitive advantage, while others sink into it when their advantages no longer work and they get laid off or their company relocates to another country or gets swallowed up in a merger that boosts the stock price for shareholders and earns the CEO a salary that in 2005 averaged more than 262 times the average worker’s pay. The system itself including the huge gap between the wealthy and everyone else and the steady proportion of people living in poverty, stays much the same. Welfare payments, food stamps, housing subsidies, and Medicaid all soften poverty’s impact, but they do little about the steady supply of people living in poverty.

Keywords: [“poverty”,”people”,”system”]
Source: http://www.agjohnson.us/essays/poverty

Alienation 2.0: Commodification of the Soul In Late-Stage Capitalism

Some work is subsistence – in fact, for the larger part of history work was mostly related to survival. Sometimes work is meaning – sure, humans can survive without Van Gogh’s Starry Night or the poetic rhythm of Omar Khayyam but wouldn’t it be almost inhuman to say such art was not worth the effort? Some work expresses human values or ideals – tidying up the kitchen helps roommates show respect for one another and volunteering to cook hot meals for the homeless at a local mosque is one way to fight poverty. Although wage labor is a lot like subsisting in many ways, wage-earners do not possess the materials, tools, or space needed for their labor while subsisting workers can access the natural resources they need to make a living. Wage labor is different from other labor because workers neither control the activity of labor itself nor the goods or services they produce. If labor improves a worker’s life or if it gives him a sense of worth and meaning, the worker is the author of his labor and working expresses the worker’s self. The worker treats her work as an object instead of a process under her control – she is alienated from her own actions. Labor moves outward as an expression of self-development and alienation reverses it – alienated labor invades the worker as an activity developing from the outside in. “Labor appears as loss of reality for workers; objectification as loss of the object and object-bondage; appropriation as estrangement, as alienation.”- Karl Marx. The core concept of Marxian alienation is that workers experience a part of themselves as something alien to them and that sounds a lot like dissociation, which psychologists described as experiences of detachment from part of a person’s reality. In a wage system, the worker is immediately alienated by the act of production because all that is produced is automatically another person’s property, disconnecting workers from work itself and its results.

Keywords: [“work”,”labor”,”value”]
Source: https://www.johnlaurits.com/2018/alienation-labor-soul-commodification