J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-17-2018

Compassionate Capitalism-Part 3

Conscious Capitalism

Mindfulness in business, work, investment, and leadership-what’s up with all that? I can remember not that long ago when the mention of mindfulness practices in the boardroom or workplace was met with blank stares; now it’s all over the place. It amazes me how quickly it’s moved beyond the fad stage into the realm of best practices. Last week I watched Arianna Huffington talking about mindfulness and business on CNBC’s Squawk Box, featuring moving first person accounts by Aetna CEO John Bertolini and Harvard Business School’s Bill George. That was followed by a HuffPost Live broadcast about mindfulness and work that included our friend and mindful.org contributor Janice Marturano, head of the Institute for Mindful Leadership. Business and work are central to our lives, so I’m very pleased about this development. Our friend Jeff Klein, a leader in this area, tells us that you will be able to learn from CEOs who are actually doing it about how conscious businesses focus on their purpose beyond profit and include the aspirations of all the stakeholders, including employees, customers and the surrounding community. Also in the Bay Area on April 30, Stanford’s CCARE will be hosting a one-day conference on Compassion and Business, presenting research and best practices by leading experts and business leaders who have successfully implemented compassion-based programs in their organizations. It will include three of our favorite leaders in the mindfulness and business world: Chade-Meng Tan of Google and SIYLI, Scott Kriens of Jupiter Networks and the 1440 Foundation, and Chip Conley who developed the Joie de Vivre hospitality chain. Four investors who consistently beat the market over more than 25 years discuss their philosophy and strategies for investing and giving. As part of the discussion, our friend Jeff Walker will lead the panel in a discussion of their own unique strategies for personal development and how these strategies help them to live a more complete and fulfilled life.

Keywords: [“business”,”Mindfulness”,”lead”]
Source: https://www.mindful.org/conscious-capitalism

Why Is There Poverty? – Allan G. Johnson

More than one out of every six people in the United States lives in poverty or near-poverty. With a majority of the people competing over what’s left to them by the elite, it’s inevitable that a substantial number of people are going to wind up on the short end and living in poverty or with the fear of it much of the time. In part poverty exists because the economic system is organized in ways that encourage the accumulation of wealth at one end and creates conditions of scarcity that make poverty inevitable at the other. If we’re interested in doing something about poverty itself – if we want a society largely free of impoverished citizens – then we’ll have to do something about both the system people participate in and how they participate in it. Learning to run faster may keep you or me out of poverty, but it won’t get rid of poverty itself. People can argue about whether chronic widespread poverty is morally acceptable or what an acceptable level of inequality might look like. If we want to understand where poverty comes from, what makes it such a stubborn feature of social life, we have to begin with the simple sociological fact that patterns of inequality result as much from how social systems are organized as they do from how individuals participate in them. The result is that some people rise out of poverty by improving their competitive advantage, while others sink into it when their advantages no longer work and they get laid off or their company relocates to another country or gets swallowed up in a merger that boosts the stock price for shareholders and earns the CEO a salary that in 2005 averaged more than 262 times the average worker’s pay. The system itself including the huge gap between the wealthy and everyone else and the steady proportion of people living in poverty, stays much the same. Welfare payments, food stamps, housing subsidies, and Medicaid all soften poverty’s impact, but they do little about the steady supply of people living in poverty.

Keywords: [“poverty”,”people”,”system”]
Source: http://www.agjohnson.us/essays/poverty

Alienation 2.0: Commodification of the Soul In Late-Stage Capitalism

Some work is subsistence – in fact, for the larger part of history work was mostly related to survival. Sometimes work is meaning – sure, humans can survive without Van Gogh’s Starry Night or the poetic rhythm of Omar Khayyam but wouldn’t it be almost inhuman to say such art was not worth the effort? Some work expresses human values or ideals – tidying up the kitchen helps roommates show respect for one another and volunteering to cook hot meals for the homeless at a local mosque is one way to fight poverty. Although wage labor is a lot like subsisting in many ways, wage-earners do not possess the materials, tools, or space needed for their labor while subsisting workers can access the natural resources they need to make a living. Wage labor is different from other labor because workers neither control the activity of labor itself nor the goods or services they produce. If labor improves a worker’s life or if it gives him a sense of worth and meaning, the worker is the author of his labor and working expresses the worker’s self. The worker treats her work as an object instead of a process under her control – she is alienated from her own actions. Labor moves outward as an expression of self-development and alienation reverses it – alienated labor invades the worker as an activity developing from the outside in. “Labor appears as loss of reality for workers; objectification as loss of the object and object-bondage; appropriation as estrangement, as alienation.”- Karl Marx. The core concept of Marxian alienation is that workers experience a part of themselves as something alien to them and that sounds a lot like dissociation, which psychologists described as experiences of detachment from part of a person’s reality. In a wage system, the worker is immediately alienated by the act of production because all that is produced is automatically another person’s property, disconnecting workers from work itself and its results.

Keywords: [“work”,”labor”,”value”]
Source: https://www.johnlaurits.com/2018/alienation-labor-soul-commodification

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-06-2018

Letter: Capitalism is not evil

While the author of a recent letter that attacked capitalism had a few valid points, I disagree vehemently with her conclusion that capitalism is “Intrinsically flawed,” implying it is even evil. Someone once said capitalism is the worst economic system, except for all the others. Yes, there are many faults in capitalism, but because of the freedoms inherent in our system, we do still have a system of checks and balances. That is not the fault of the system, but of ourselves. I would illustrate my view of the difference between capitalism and socialism to the story of two brothers. One worked hard in school, got a scholarship to college, worked long hours in his profession and prospered. Socialism has less motivation to work hard because the expectation is that the government will take care of you. China began to prosper only when it began to allow the people to get the rewards of their hard work. Yes, there are faults in our system of free enterprise, but there are greater faults in every other system. We can only do that because we are prosperous, and we are prosperous because of our system of free enterprise.

Keywords: [“system”,”work”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://www.deseretnews.com/article/865694887/Letter-Capitalism-is…

Pope Francis on capitalism

The church began to proclaim a consistently strong message on social justice in 1891 when Pope Leo XIII issued his encyclical Rerum Novarum. Every pope since then has upheld the rights of workers, and the need to provide a living wage and decent working conditions to everyone. Now Pope Francis is adding his voice to the chorus of papal statements fostering social justice. While the writings of other popes have tended to sit on shelves collecting dust, the words of Pope Francis are front and center in the current debate. Wittingly or unwittingly, the pope has waded into this debate. This straightforward style also leads to a third factor, which involves the content of what Pope Francis is saying. Pope Francis’ writing and speaking style is clear and unambiguous. Finally, Francis makes clear that unless opportunities are provided for the poor, violence and conflict will inevitably result. It would be difficult to read these words and believe that the pope is just some nice guy who feels compassion for the poor. Francis speaks clearly and dramatically about structural problems that need to be addressed.

Keywords: [“Pope”,”world”,”Francis”]
Source: https://www.ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/pope-francis-capitalism

Product Release: Marketplace Live Conscious Capitalism® Game

Dr. Ernie Cadotte, Dr. Raj Sisodia, and the Conscious Capitalism® Institute have teamed up to create a new simulation. It is called Conscious Capitalism® in the Marketplace. The simulation is designed to illustrate and reinforce the key tenants of the Conscious Capitalism® movement. The Conscious Capitalism® scenario is played out through industry news releases and in-basket memos. Here are some specifics about the play of the Conscious Capitalism® game. The simulation is built upon the Venture Strategy game, one of our most popular Marketplace Live simulations. In the first two quarters of the game, there are not many conscious issues to delve into. Though there are a few references and a couple of key strategic decisions, the conscious element is subtle. The goal of the first two quarters is to get students acquainted with the software, game scenario, decisions, and information before they tackle conscious issues. Once the Conscious Capitalism® simulation is out of the beta stage of testing, our support and sales team will be happy to give personal tours of the game.

Keywords: [“Conscious”,”simulation”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://www.marketplace-simulation.com/blog/new-product…

Inventory of the Foundation for a Compassionate Society collection, 1976-1997

The Foundation operated as an umbrella organization for peace projects that Vaughan was involved with at the time. Content Abstract: The collection consists of articles, brochures, pamphlets, clippings and other printed material. Genevieve Vaughan is an independent researcher who has funded projects by women to further the work of social change. She has been working on the theory of a maternal gift economy as an alternative to Patriarchal Capitalism for many years. The Foundation for a Compassionate Society closed in 1998. Scope and Content Note The collection consists of articles, brochures, pamphlets, clippings and other printed material. Restrictions Access Restrictions This collection is housed at UTSA’s Main Campus and must be accessed via the John Peace Library Special Collections reading room. To request access, please use the Collections Request Form. Usage Restrictions The researcher assumes full responsibility for observing all copyright, property, and libel laws as they apply. Processing Information More detailed processing is not anticipated at this time.

Keywords: [“collection”,”Access”,”Restrictions”]
Source: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/utsa/00185/utsa-00185.html

January 22, 2018

My gaze fell upon the guilty elderly man and his wife. The elderly lady spoke to the man in Marathi, reminding him that the locals that they had traveled in before never had closed doors. The elderly man allayed her fears, saying that positive changes must have happened. I decided to wait and see whether a ticket checker would come by. My heart froze as the ticket checker walked seat by seat. The ticket checker arrived at our seat, he looked at my season ticket with a cursory glance and gave it back. He asked the elderly couple and the man took out two carefully kept tickets of Rs. 20 each from a plastic pouch in his front pocket and handed it to the ticket checker. The ticket checker held the tickets in front of him and looked back and forth at the couple. The ticket checker said, “Kaka, He AC Local aahe. Hyaat vegla ticket lagta”. Suddenly, after a moment the ticket checker said, “No problem, Do one thing, get down at the next station.” At this moment, I found my voice as I said, “Nahi tyana mahit navhta”.

Keywords: [“ticket”,”man”,”checker”]
Source: https://nobodyreadsabloganymore.wordpress.com/2018/01/22/…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-06-2018

Biblical Capitalism in Uncertain Economic Times

Let’s examine how Christians might think about matters of the economy, capitalism, and government. For a recent and very real example, the whole mortgage mess is traceable to two government interventions: the Federal Reserve Board’s keeping interest rates too low too long in the early part of this decade, and government’s persistent pressure on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to make loans to people who could not afford them! Both of these efforts were done with the best of intentions! Self-government, as America’s founding fathers noticed, places more importance on the individual, family, and church levels of government than civil government. The role of government should be to encourage free enterprise-not favoring certain enterprises over others unless there is a clear moral mandate or a systemic risk, that is, a risk to the whole economy. Further, in general, government should not do social engineering or interfere with free markets by favoring technological changes-unless there is a clear national interest such as national defense. Welfare State? No. In general, the federal government’s continual attempt to socialize welfare programs is not biblical. The government should require down payments on home purchases and the government should set stricter rules about how much banks should be able to lend against their balance sheet. Government intervention in the economy since the Depression has in fact smoothed out the business cycle. Government Support for the Auto Industry? No. This is a distortion of capitalism that should be avoided. Since we are drawing on inferences as well as historical observation, others may disagree as to how government should intervene in the economy.

Keywords: [“government”,”Capitalism”,”Biblical”]
Source: http://www.faithfacts.org/blog/biblical-capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism

These economist shared different perspectives with regards to where the emphasize for a new model of global Capitalism should be. First it is accepted that unregulated capitalism or Market Fundamentalism has failed us. Of primary importance now is the stabilization of the market and on this note I did notice that many economist did agree with a strategy for stabilizing the financial institutions. The market should be transparent and held to public accountability. Public regulations should be carefully developed so that they safeguard the public from market volatility but that they do not obstruct the flow of the market. One cannot of course look to the market alone to produce a virtues system since the market itself is value free. This is where our political and social institutions come in, to nudge the market in a way that it can bring financial growth and prosperity while making sure that it does so in a way that can compassionately address the needs of all who are affected by the market. With this call to promote a compassionate model of capitalism we feel obliged to champion a perspective of what this model could look like. As we are a religious community we do not attempt to offer actual economic policies, but in this blog we would like to highlight an economist who offers some interesting insight into policies that some of us feel may bring about a compassionate form of capitalism. Hernando De Soto is a famous Peruvian economist who promotes the cause of bringing capitalism to the poor by giving people in developing countries an actual opportunity to have access to capital and basic protection of rights to property as well as basic human services and needs.

Keywords: [“Market”,”economist”,”Capitalism”]
Source: https://passionistjpic.wordpress.com/…/26/compassionate-capitalism

It Was Fun – Collective Evolution

So who is really busy stopping the amount of plastic in our oceans, soon to be on nano level in all our food? Who stops the amount of oestrogens rising in our systems, damaging fertility of men? Who stops the rising amounts of waste, that leak and endanger humans and nature? I don’t hear no governments crying out loud. Most work is organized around process and efficiency, rather than around meaning, healthiness for natural systems, being of real service to real needs, rather than boosting sales for profit. Having enough nature, living blooming systems flourishing around us, is key to feel at peace, build trust and know we are part of a living system. So how to support our role within and for nature and the whole system called mother Earth? How to shift the system so we provide for future generations as well? Everything is economized, which means if you don’t increase profit to the system, read are old, sick or unemployed, you are ballast to society. As if the millions of non earning humans, think volunteers and activists, taking care of elderly, sick, refugees and nature are ballast!? As if a tree standing in a forest has no value for the whole, even when we don’t know how it exactly enriches the whole system. Our whole educational system keeps teaching us, to be like them to succeed. What system will let everybody and everything win? What system will provide enough for everyone on the planet? And there is proof enough that there is enough. We need a system that is medication, not more of the same. Develop economical systems that won’t stop people from working on essential things, when the money system breaks down.

Keywords: [“system”,”people”,”more”]
Source: http://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/01/17/goodbye-democracy…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-05-2018

Late-stage capitalism: Denying the Imperium of Death

The emotional and physical pain, anxiety, and depression inflicted by the trauma inherent to a system sustained by perpetual exploitation has proven to be too much for a sizeable number of human beings to endure thus their need to self-medicate. The forces in play impose a colonizing effect upon the mind; therefore, a large percent of the afflicted have lost the ability to detect the hyper-entropic system’s ravaging effects. Stranded among the commercial come-ons and hyper-authoritarianism inherent to late-stage capitalism’s imperium of death, the human psyche, like the biosphere of our planet, subjected, at present, to humankind-wrought ecocide, has begun to display the terrible beauty of a nightmare. I’ve known, over the years, hundreds of human beings, born into and ensnared by the crime against humanity known as poverty, broken by the culture of greed and social degradation, and blamed by the clueless and the callous for the tragic trajectory in which impersonal fate and the wounding culture, by no fault of their own, has placed them. Truth is the system, a hierarchy of ghouls, is maintained by harvesting the corpses of the powerless, by means of imperial slaughter and domestic, economic exploitation. The system’s psychopathic beneficiaries, in particular, are aware of the reality. Moreover the beneficiaries of the system promote the lie that shame should be the exclusive dominion of those broken by their system, a system, which is, in essence, a form of government-sanctioned gangsterism, by which they, the ruthless few, and they alone, benefit. We human beings, as a species, have arrived at a profound point of demarcation: paradigm shift or perish. The victims of drug overdoses and, in general, the large and rising, without precedent, untimely deaths of middle-aged, laboring-class people should be regarded as canaries in the coal mines of the late-stage capitalist order, an augury of calamities that loom due to the exponentially increasing harm being inflicted upon both humanity and environmental forces crucial to sustaining the continued viability of the human race. If reality is met head-on, if empire, external and its inner analog, is renounced and challenged, then a liberation staged by the heart’s partisans can begin, thereby freeing up a great amount of acreage – a fructifying landscape – wherein both the earth’s ecosystem and the architecture of human desire can begin to co-exist and cross-pollinate thus a crucial re-visioning of oneself and the culture can begin.

Keywords: [“system”,”human”,”being”]
Source: https://www.mintpressnews.com/late-stage-capitalism-denying-the…

Compassion and Politics

The attack exemplified a notable recent trend in the discourse of prominent wealthy Democrats: the heaping of limitless contempt upon poor people. ” “Karma is a bitch and if these people choose to continue to vote Republican and try to deny other. [sic] from attaining the American dream, they deserve no better than what they are getting!” “I for one have little sympathy for these despairing whites. If they can’t compete against people of color when everything has been rigged in their favor, then there’s really no help for them. Trump and his G(r)OPers will do little to elevate their lot. If anything, these poor whites will be hired to dig grave pits and assemble their own coffins.” Rich is a wealthy man telling poor people that their problems are their own fault and they should exercise some personal responsibility. Someone whose publicly-stated view is that the country should be run by its enlightened oligarchs and the children of its Harvard economics professors, thinks the Democratic Party is a more congenial home for his politics than the Republican Party. We can design a kind of useful metric-a Barrometer, if you will-for determining whether your political party is adequately representing working people’s interests. It’s quite simple: if Josh Barro is in your party, then your party is failing to represent working people’s interests. “Today’s Democrats talk about the Republican-leaning parts of the United States as though they were particularly unsympathetic Third World countries, populated by people who not only lost life’s lottery but deserved it.” The answer is that Democrats are supposed to be the ones who aren’t callous assholes like Kevin Williamson, that they’re the ones who are supposed to believe people don’t bring their pain on themselves and that you don’t discard people merely because they’ve made foolish decisions. The moment you find yourself saying “They brought it on themselves” or “I have no sympathy,” you have ceased to practice the basic moral principle that should drive left-wing politics, which is a deep compassion for people’s struggles and a desire to help them make their lives better. The whole idea of universal compassion is that you don’t have to choose: you care about people in proportion to the amount they are being hurt, so the people who will be hurt the most can receive the most attention without diminishing the struggles of those who are being hurt somewhat less.

Keywords: [“people”,”Party”,”Trump”]
Source: https://www.currentaffairs.org/2017/03/compassion-and-politics

Top 10 Reasons To Be Proud Of The United States of America

As a veteran, I thought a top ten list outlining what makes America great might be in order, especially today. Of course, many of America’s finest inventors came here from other countries, but that doesn’t detract from the fact that it was in America that they found the right combination of freedom and financial resources to do amazing things. Sadly, history is replete with citizens suffering religious persecution and violence at the hands of both their own government, as well as from other religious groups This has rarely been the case in America where citizens are guaranteed the right to worship as they wish-or not worship at all if that is their desire-without fear of being arrested, persecuted, or shunned by the rest of society, as is so often the case in some countries. The ability of anyone to start a business and become wealthy in this country, as compared to most other nations, is one of the hallmarks of what America is all about. The Mexican-American war of 1845 is a good example of this; though the brief war ended in a Mexican rout, America not only didn’t annex the country, but quickly withdrew once hostilities ended. Most likely there wouldn’t even be a United States today, but a plethora of small and mid-sized countries much like we see in Europe, with all the strife such divisions naturally manifest. There are many places of breath-taking beauty around the globe, with each country lying claim to its own natural wonders and extraordinary scenery, but no one country possesses such a broad range of natural wonders as does the United States. Stretching from California in the West, to New England in the East, the United States of America covers an area of 3.79 million square miles, making it the third largest nation on Earth, by area. In what other country on the planet can you go from snow-capped mountain peaks to white sandy beaches, and from the desert to forested mountains, all within a few hours driving time of each other? That’s why America is one of the top tourist attractions for foreigners; few of whom have anything like the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, the Everglades, or Pikes Peak back home. How popular are we? According to the U.N.’s World Tourism Organization, each year the U.S. consistently places second on the list of the top ten most visited countries, with a whopping 60 million foreign visitors coming to our shores each year.

Keywords: [“country”,”America”,”even”]
Source: http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-reasons-to-be-proud-of-the-united-states.php

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Compassionate Exchange

START YOUR INTEGRAL LIFE “If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” Compassionate Exchange is a way to move freely through all perspectives available to you, instead of staying chronically identified with only one. In Compassionate Exchange, we dissolve the armor that builds up around this limited, survival-based orientation. We reverse the self’s usual orientation and breathe in suffering, and then breathe out the pleasurable release of suffering. Compassionate Exchange can be practiced for any length of time. Picture someone dear to you and breathe this person’s distress and suffering into your heart. As you exhale, breathe out the essence of freedom from suffering, and direct it towards this person. Each time you breathe in, take in the suffering and distress of more and more people. Each time you breathe out, breathe out the essence of release and freedom from suffering and direct it towards this larger group of people. Breathe out the essence of release and freedom from suffering, and direct it out towards all beings. Take in your own suffering and distress, and breathe out the essence of freedom of suffering, directing it towards yourself. As the final step in the practice of Compassionate Exchange, notice that you and all the people you have pictured and all the suffering and freedom from suffering are arising in the awareness that is witnessing all of this, and this is who you truly are.

Keywords: [“suffering”,”breathe”,”Practice”]
Source: https://integrallife.com/compassionate-exchange-2

Download and Read Compassionate Capitalism Compassionate Capitalism Come with us to read a new book that is coming recently. Yeah, this is a new coming book that many people really want to read will you be one of them? Of course, you should be. Hard will be felt when you have no ideas about what kind of book to read. Or sometimes, your reading material is not interesting enough. Lis m And why don’t try this book to read? compassionate capitalism is one of the most referred reading material for any levels. When you really want to seek for the new inspiring book to read and you don’t have any ideas at all, this following book can be taken. This is not complicated book, no complicated words to read, and any complicated theme and topics to understand. The book is very appreciated to be one of the most inspiring coming books this recently. Ca p ita What do you think of this book? Are you still confused with this book? When you are really interested to read based on the PDF of this book, you can see how the book will give you many things. It is not only about the how this book concern about, it is about what you can take from the book when you have read. Even that’s only for few pages it will help you to give additional inspirations. Te What about the way to get this book? So easy! compassionate capitalism is given for soft file of the book. When clicking you can find the book and concern with it. Now, your choice to pick this book to be yours is so simple.

Keywords: [“book”,”Read”,”Capitalism”]
Source: http://wewede.de/compassionate/capitalism/compassionate_capitalism.pdf

Compassion, the Antidote

Martin Doblmeier: During the Vietnam War your own people found themselves deeply divided. Thich Nhat Hanh: There was a lot of suffering and people found themselves in a situation where they had become enemies of each other. Nhat Hanh: Forgiveness will not be possible until compassion is born in our heart. In order to be compassionate, you have to understand why the other person has done that to you and your people. Doblmeier: In a practical way how can we enliven that understanding and compassion within our own communities and families? You say, “I listen to him only with one purpose, to give him a chance to empty his heart. I am doing charity work.” But compassion will protect you from anger, and that is why compassion is the antidote for anger. If you master the art of listening deeply and of compassion, you can open the heart of the other person. Nhat Hanh: An act of compassion always brings about transformation. You react with compassion, and sooner or later you see the transformation in the other person. You go home with the intention to help, with the intention to help not only innocent people, victims of violence, of injustice, but you have the intention to help those who have done injustice to other people. So not only did we help the people who wanted us to help, but we helped the people who didn’t want us to help. Nhat Hanh: During my absence about 35 million people were born in Vietnam, and most of the people of my generation have died.

Keywords: [“compassion”,”people”,”person”]
Source: http://www.filmsforaction.org/articles/compassion-the-antidote

Patterico’s Pontifications » There Is No Freedom Without Capitalism

This morning I said: without capitalism, there is no freedom. A couple of commenters took issue with that statement. Understanding the relationship of capitalism to freedom is fundamental to understanding why Obama’s handling of the economic crisis is such a disaster. Now that we’ve moved beyond the President firing corporate CEOs to Barney Frank seeking to set corporate salaries, we have to be crystal clear on this point. Too often a false contrast is made between the impersonal marketplace and the compassionate policies of various government programs. Both systems face the same scarcity of resources and both systems make choices within the constraints of that scarcity. The difference is that one system involves each individual making choices for himself or herself, while the other system involves a smaller number of people making choices for others. It may be fashionable for journalists to refer to “The whim of the marketplace,” as if that were something different from the desires of people, just as it was once fashionable to refer to “Production for use, rather than for profit” – as if profits could be made by producing things that people cannot use or do not want to use. The real contrast is between choices made by individuals for themselves and choices made for them by others who presume to define what these individuals “Really” need. Capitalism is each individual making choices for himself. Socialism is those who claim to know best, making your choices for you.

Keywords: [“choices”,”made”,”system”]
Source: http://patterico.com/2009/03/31/there-is-no-freedom-without-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Compassionate Capitalism – What it Must Be

One ventures to define it as a way to reconcile one’s faith and conscience to the sometimes-unpleasant arena of business. While some enlightened executives have tried in good faith to give back to the faithful, most of the cogs in the wheel, big and small, are content to simply partake in the everyday business of corporate rapine without a second thought, nullifying any conscientious effort to give back. The problem is, most businesses haven’t developed a sense of compassion while IN business. As for business-to-business relations: Business needs to provide product, gain reasonable profit. Business must be good to employees, since employees = Man. Business develops new, tangible, practical products, which will truly help improve Man’s condition over the long run, make Man happy. Again, to reiterate: Compassionate Capitalism should be about being moral and considerate in business dealings, not just philantrophy or penance. All businesses, especially large corporations, must reevalute whether they are really helping customers when they house them; or if they are screwing them ten times over, by handing them a loan that they have no business handling. Compassionate Capitalism should be about realizing what is good for Man overall, not what should be good, because. Strive to do good business always, with my customers and competitors alike. To a certain extent, they are my partners in my business, and they are also representative of the community I serve. For my business is still dependent on the general welfare of my main customer, all of Humanity.

Keywords: [“business”,”give”,”businesses”]
Source: https://anabasius.wordpress.com/2009/05/11/compassionate…

Compassionate Capitalism In The Middle Ages: Profit And Philanthropy In Medieval Cambridge – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Profits from property speculation in the Middle Ages were re-invested into local communities. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Our analysis is based on over one thousand properties recorded in the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Statistical analysis of the levels of rent shows that messuages and shops were the most valuable properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: http://www.eurasiareview.com/08052017-compassionate-capitalism-in-the…

Compassionate Capitalism In The Middle Ages: Profit And Philanthropy In Medieval Cambridge – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Profits from property speculation in the Middle Ages were re-invested into local communities. Using recently discovered documents on medieval Cambridge, we have investigated how money was made through property speculation and how the profits of successful speculation were spent. Our analysis is based on over one thousand properties recorded in the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279. Property markets developed in medieval England as burgage plots were laid out in new or expanding towns by local landowners, with the king’s permission. Our research combines statistical analysis of medieval records with detailed analysis of the backgrounds of the individuals and institutions that developed property portfolios. We identify patterns in rents, highlight strategies used to assemble property portfolios and examine how the profits of property speculation were spent. Property was a desirable asset in medieval Cambridge, much as it is today. Medieval speculators invested in a variety of properties. Statistical analysis of the levels of rent shows that messuages and shops were the most valuable properties. Property hotspots with high-rents can be identified in three parts of medieval Cambridge: at the road junction by the hospital; west of the market; and near the river just south of the hospital. Figure 2 Map of medieval Cambridge showing property hotspots. Cambridge was home to several families who had acquired property through the military service of their Norman ancestors, including the Dunning family who owned 12 plots in 1279.

Keywords: [“property”,”medieval”,”Hospital”]
Source: https://www.eurasiareview.com/08052017-compassionate-capitalism-in…

The Capitalism Site

Rand’s description highlights the key aspects of capitalism on several different levels. Ethically, the moral base of capitalism is the principle that the individual has an inalienable right to their life, i.e., as a sovereign being. Politically, capitalism is a social system based on the principle of individual rights, i.e., freedom. It is to banish the initiation of physical force from all relationships that governments are instituted. Objective control highlights the essential characteristic of capitalism’s legal system. Legally, capitalism is a legal system of objectively defined laws based on individual rights, i.e., the rule of law as opposed to the “Rule of man”. Under such a legal system one is free to act so long as one does not violate the rights of others, i.e., the government is not a regulator but a referee. Economically, when such freedom under a “Rule of law” is applied to the sphere of production and trade, its result is the free-market. Under capitalism, there is a separation of economics and state, just like there is a separation of religion and state. A free-market is entirely dependent on a specific ethical, political, and legal foundation; without that foundation, it is only free in name. The goal of this site is to elaborate on the nature of this foundation and then to answer the errors behind the popular arguments against capitalism. When one does examine them one will find that the source of the error is the influence of one’s philosophy.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”system”,”i.e.”]
Source: http://capitalism.org/capitalism/what-is-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

10 Reasons to Hate Capitalism

Capitalism is a system of minority privilege and class rule based on the private ownership of means of livelihood. Capitalists praise freedom and individualism, but they destroy freedom and individualism for everyone but themselves. Capitalists denigrate cooperation and collectivism, but create mass production processes that rely on both from workers. Capitalism requires the largest propaganda system the world has ever known to convince us it is the only system possible. Capitalism is a system in which the principle of one dollar, one vote, dominates that of one person, one vote. Capitalism proclaims the virtue of naked self-interest, but self-interest without regard for morality, ecology or common sense leads to environmental degradation, destruction of indigenous communities, colonialism, war and other forms of mass destruction. Self-interest leads capitalists to seek profit absolutely everywhere, regardless of the damage done to other people and the health of the planet’s ecosystem. Self-interest leads capitalists to destroy any rival economic system or way of thinking that can be a barrier to their endless quest for profit. Capitalism is not a friend to democracy but ultimately its enemy. When pushed, capitalists choose capitalism over democracy. If people use democracy to weaken the power of capitalists the rich and powerful turn to various forms of fascism in order to keep their privileges. Capitalists make profits from global warming, from destroying our oceans, from pumping ever more chemicals into the atmosphere and from patenting everything they can, including life itself.

Keywords: [“Capitalist”,”Capitalism”,”system”]
Source: https://www.alternet.org/economy/10-reasons-hate-capitalism

10 Reasons to Hate Capitalism

Capitalism is a system of minority privilege and class rule based on the private ownership of means of livelihood. Capitalists praise freedom and individualism, but they destroy freedom and individualism for everyone but themselves. Capitalists denigrate cooperation and collectivism, but create mass production processes that rely on both from workers. Capitalism requires the largest propaganda system the world has ever known to convince us it is the only system possible. Capitalism is a system in which the principle of one dollar, one vote, dominates that of one person, one vote. Capitalism proclaims the virtue of naked self-interest, but self-interest without regard for morality, ecology or common sense leads to environmental degradation, destruction of indigenous communities, colonialism, war and other forms of mass destruction. Self-interest leads capitalists to seek profit absolutely everywhere, regardless of the damage done to other people and the health of the planet’s ecosystem. Self-interest leads capitalists to destroy any rival economic system or way of thinking that can be a barrier to their endless quest for profit. Capitalism is not a friend to democracy but ultimately its enemy. When pushed, capitalists choose capitalism over democracy. If people use democracy to weaken the power of capitalists the rich and powerful turn to various forms of fascism in order to keep their privileges. Capitalists make profits from global warming, from destroying our oceans, from pumping ever more chemicals into the atmosphere and from patenting everything they can, including life itself.

Keywords: [“Capitalist”,”Capitalism”,”system”]
Source: https://dangerousminds.net/comments/10_reasons_to_hate_capitalism

The rise of state capitalism

These are all monuments to the rise of a new kind of hybrid corporation, backed by the state but behaving like a private-sector multinational. State-directed capitalism is not a new idea: witness the East India Company. In 2009 China Mobile and another state giant, China National Petroleum Corporation, made profits of $33 billion-more than China’s 500 most profitable private companies combined. State giants soak up capital and talent that might have been used better by private companies. State companies are good at copying others, partly because they can use the government’s clout to get hold of their technology; but as they have to produce ideas of their own they will become less competitive. State capitalism works well only when directed by a competent state. Everywhere state capitalism favours well-connected insiders over innovative outsiders. Thus the model produces cronyism, inequality and eventually discontent-as the Mubaraks’ brand of state capitalism did in Egypt. Rising powers have always used the state to kick-start growth: think of Japan and South Korea in the 1950s or Germany in the 1870s or even the United States after the war of independence. For emerging countries wanting to make their mark on the world, state capitalism has an obvious appeal. Both for their own sake, and in the interests of world trade, the practitioners of state capitalism need to start unwinding their huge holdings in favoured companies and handing them over to private investors. If these companies are as good as they boast they are, then they no longer need the crutch of state support.

Keywords: [“company”,”state”,”government”]
Source: http://www.economist.com/node/21543160

‘Compassionate capitalism,’ another name for social entrepreneurship

To achieve successful social entrepreneurship, one should be “Even more” creative and innovative as such endeavors seek not just to make profits but also to create a better society, Penny Low, founder of the Social Innovation Park, said in an interview with The Korea Herald on Monday. Low has been leading the nonprofit organization that promotes social entrepreneurship. “Charity is a hand-out, and there are certain organizations that need funds from outside. But social enterprise is more about hand-up. If a social entrepreneur has right causes, people and funds will automatically follow,” Low said. Calling social entrepreneurship “Compassionate capitalism,” Low underscored that education from an early age is key to fostering social entrepreneurship that can solve disparity. Low: The vision of Social Innovation Park is to build a more inclusive, sustainable and mindful world by providing platforms for collaborations and partnerships. KH: What would be the three important attributes for social entrepreneurship? For social entrepreneurship, you just add, “Even more” in front of them. Social entrepreneurs should be even more creative, even more innovative. Another name for social entrepreneurship is compassionate capitalism. Can social entrepreneurship counter the disparity issue? The company might not have started as a social enterprise, but it clearly has social missions itself. KH: Any advice for countries that are currently on the beginning stage of developing education programs designed to help social entrepreneurship settle in?

Keywords: [“social”,”entrepreneurship”,”Low”]
Source: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20171114000811

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-03-2018

Free markets are the single most important tools to eliminate poverty and spread opportunity. Our answer is much simpler, these markets and institutions do not emerge because the capitalists oppose them, and for a very obvious reason. The problem is that people do not distinguish enough between true free market capitalism, which implies competition and equal access, and the failed version Sufiya Begum sees and both get tarred with the same brush. One cannot adopt the posture of the traditional right saying any government suffocates markets. Neither should one adopt the posture of the traditional left that markets are terrible and governments should replace them. The right position is the Goldilocks position – neither too little nor too much of the government is best for markets. All the political attempts to improve capitalism focused on limiting markets rather than on enhancing them. We do not want to tame the creative power of markets, we want to liberate it. So what do we propose? In sum, markets need political support to provide the right amount of rules and regulations that will allow them to flourish. 1) Efficient ownership Inefficient owners tend to oppose rules that promote competition – they see the downside of freer markets rather than the upside of opportunity that those markets bring. The problem is that those without hope in the market economy will understandably use their political power to subvert its foundations: witness the march of steelworkers on Washington to demand protection. We have only recently recovered from the closing down of markets that took place in the 1930s.

Keywords: [“market”,”rule”,”steel”]
Source: http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/luigi.zingales/papers/research/cappres.pdf

Compassionate Capitalism

We would only add recognition for the compassionate capitalists who have heroically restrained their natural desire to cut greenhouse gases and reduce pollution, in order to protect the jobs of others less fortunate than themselves. One must admire the extent of compassion expressed by the captains of capitalism. Some people unfairly snickered when George Bush declared himself a compassionate conservative, but he is a passionate advocate of business and his description may have been accurate. Despite all the talk about greed being the fuel that drives capitalism, profits are virtually irrelevant. As further evidence, I read today that the Bank of America is reluctant to lower the value of its own loans out of compassion for the people who stayed up-to-date with their payments. One of the motives for subprime loans was to meet the desires for people who wanted enjoy homeownership. Business opposes minimum wages out of compassion for workers who might lose their jobs. For the same reason, business reluctantly accepts tax breaks only because it allows them to help unfortunate workers who might find themselves without a boss. The same motives explain why business fights so heroically against regulation. Finding themselves without a social safety net, people receive an education, allowing them to navigate the complexities of the marketplace, assuming that they survive the experience. Should such people meet their maker, their demise will represent a charitable gift to the poor-oppressed taxpayers, who already shoulder excessive burdens. Taxpayers are the most admired agents in capitalism.

Keywords: [“people”,”business”,”compassion”]
Source: http://climateandcapitalism.com/2011/03/11/3942

‘Compassionate Capitalism’: America’s Christian ‘Rehab’ Chicken Plants Are Little Better Than Labor Camps – Daily News Bite

The exposé focuses on a chicken production plant in Missouri where judges have been giving prisoners with addiction issues the choice of either going to prison or working for a year at the plant. According to one individual who worked at these camps,. The judge who sent McGahey to the “Chicken farm” told him that he needed to learn a “Work ethic” before sending him off to labor for an organization that had no ethic at all, work or otherwise. It was started in 2007 by chicken company executives struggling to find workers. By forming a Christian rehab, they could supply plants with a cheap and captive labor force while helping men overcome their addictions. The rehab organization is CAAIR – Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery, but it doesn’t offer much in the way of rehabilitation for addicts. Bosses threatened employees with prison if they got hurt or worked too slow. Most of the men in CAAIR work for Simmons Inc., a company with an annual revenue of $1.4 billion. Don’t even think about time off to heal or workers compensation. The laborers in these camps are required to attend weekly Bible study meetings and counseling for their addiction, although that counseling gets canceled when there’s work that needs to be done. While the 13th Amendment allows prison labor camps, the men working in CAAIR camps haven’t been convicted of anything. The ACLU has announced that it plans to file a lawsuit as a result of Reveal News finding, but it’s worth remembering that if you’re an American, you don’t have to travel to an underdeveloped nation to find slave labor camps.

Keywords: [“Work”,”camps”,”find”]
Source: http://dailynewsbite.com/chicken-plants-are-little-better-than-labor-camps

10 Reasons to Hate Capitalism

Capitalism is a system of minority privilege and class rule based on the private ownership of means of livelihood. Capitalists praise freedom and individualism, but they destroy freedom and individualism for everyone but themselves. Capitalists denigrate cooperation and collectivism, but create mass production processes that rely on both from workers. Capitalism requires the largest propaganda system the world has ever known to convince us it is the only system possible. Capitalism is a system in which the principle of one dollar, one vote, dominates that of one person, one vote. Capitalism proclaims the virtue of naked self-interest, but self-interest without regard for morality, ecology or common sense leads to environmental degradation, destruction of indigenous communities, colonialism, war and other forms of mass destruction. Self-interest leads capitalists to seek profit absolutely everywhere, regardless of the damage done to other people and the health of the planet’s ecosystem. Self-interest leads capitalists to destroy any rival economic system or way of thinking that can be a barrier to their endless quest for profit. Capitalism is not a friend to democracy but ultimately its enemy. When pushed, capitalists choose capitalism over democracy. If people use democracy to weaken the power of capitalists the rich and powerful turn to various forms of fascism in order to keep their privileges. Capitalists make profits from global warming, from destroying our oceans, from pumping ever more chemicals into the atmosphere and from patenting everything they can, including life itself.

Keywords: [“Capitalist”,”Capitalism”,”system”]
Source: http://www.alternet.org/economy/10-reasons-hate-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

Capitalism Research Papers Help College Students

Order PaperOur Prices Who We Are What We Do Capitalism is inherently competitive and guarantees nothing to those who, for one reason or another, are incapable of competing successfully. Capitalism is inherently competitive and guarantees nothing to those who, for one reason or another, are incapable of competing successfully. One way to approach capitalism in a research paper is to illustrate that capitalism is exploitative in that it forces people to be “Competitive” rather than “Cooperative”. Capitalism, because it is inherently competitive, creates a situation in which businesses either grow or die. The world of work in a modern corporation is frequently a kind of pressure cooker for capitalism and the worker. In your research paper, you should use Marxist concepts even though you may not be a believer in the Marxist system taken as a whole. One longs for a kind of economic “Peaceable kingdom”; such cannot exist under an economic system in which competition plays such a large role as it does in capitalism. A research paper on capitalism from the political science standpoint shows that there would be a lot less of it if the competitive pressures that are an inevitable part of capitalist systems were not at work. Capitalism is known as a system where private owners control every aspect of an industry in order to make profits for their own interests. For the most part, capitalism can be viewed as complex system based on inequality and monopoly. In the economy that exists today, capitalism would not be beneficial since it would allow a free market to gain the power of monopoly. Although there are blends of capitalism that exist all over the world, it may not be the best system for the United States.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”competitive”]
Source: https://www.papermasters.com/capitalism.html

Is Capitalism the Problem? –

His concern is that the book misdiagnoses our modern problem by not going straight to the root of the problem – capitalism. To get results, he claims, one must have the courage to reject capitalism in all its forms. Capitalism is a spiritual problem that embodies materialism, scientific utopianism, and libertarianism. He affirms that a careful reading of Saint Thomas and papal encyclicals over the last century warns us about the materialism of our days that has its origins in capitalism. I would disagree that we should call the cause of these errors “Capitalism” for three reasons. Many simply equate capitalism with a market economy which has always been defended by the Church. Because of the term’s misuses, it is wiser to follow the advice of Jesuit economist Fr. Bernard Dempsey, who claims that capitalism is a word incapable of scientific definition, and one that should only be used with great reluctance and care, commenting: “Only a very foolish general accepts battle on the terrain of his adversary’s choice.”1. The Church has often spoken out against the abuses of “Capitalism” such as materialism, individualism and scientific utopianism. It has never roundly condemned “Capitalism” as such, lest it condemn inadvertently the market economy and other legitimate ways of conducting business. There is another reason why I do not use the ambiguous term “Capitalism.” It is the term of choice of the Church’s enemies. The Church cannot make common cause with those who hate and actively work to destroy Her. Finally, the last reason why I do not use the word “Capitalism” as the cause for the present ills is because it cannot be the root cause of any moral decay.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”cause”,”term”]
Source: http://www.returntoorder.org/2013/09/capitalism-problem

‘Rosenwald’ doc will reaffirm your faith in the American dream

The superbly wrought documentary “Rosenwald” should be mandatory viewing for all Illinois residents, especially Chicagoans. A big chunk of “Rosenwald” reports the story of how the son of a Jewish peddler became the owner of the vast Sears and Roebuck empire in Chicago, and how he invested his vast fortunes not in stocks, bonds or foreign companies, but in his own nation’s future. The last part of “Rosenwald” steps away from a straight biography and delves into the social, economic, political, educational and cultural ripple effects of this man’s expansive, committed philanthropy. If this didn’t really happen, you might think the story was some fabricated Santa Claus fantasy. Filmmaker Aviva Kempner profiles high school dropout Julius Rosenwald, who, influenced by writer Booker T. Washington, used his vast resources as president of Sears to fulfill his Jewish beliefs of tzedakah and tikkun olam to improve life. He set out to equalize the playing fields of everyday life. During the Jim Crow South, he built more than 5,300 schools. He awarded grants to hundreds and hundreds of African American intellectuals and artists. The German-born Kempner – most known for her doc “The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg” – constructs a remarkably engaging report filled with archival footage, strong images, comic relief but without shying away from the darker moments in which the KKK burned down many of Rosenwald’s schools. “Rosenwald” will reaffirm your faith in capitalism, compassion, community, diversity, social justice and the American dream. “Rosenwald” opens at the Century Centre in Chicago and the Highland Park Renaissance Place. Dann Gire’s Reel Life column runs Friday in Time out!

Keywords: [“Rosenwald”,”life”,”school”]
Source: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20150903/entlife/150909727

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

No, Capitalism Is Not Ruining Your Christmas

Glowing Christmas lights fill the cold streets of medieval European cities with little wooden booths selling steaming hot wine and cinnamon biscuits. First off: Christmas markets are, at least in Europe, a billion euro industry. In a more detailed analysis on Christmas markets in the UK, researchers found that in the example of the city of Manchester, an average stall at a Christmas market generated £3,500 per day. Your local Christmas market is a money-making machine regardless of it selling candles or car insurance. Christmas markets in Brussels, Belgium, and Strasbourg, France count between 1.5 and 2 million visitors. The Christmas market on Paris’ Champs-Elysées counts over 200 booths and over a staggering 15 million visitors each year. The Christmas spirit is supposed to advocate for empathy and compassion, as the biblical stories describe Jesus, a poor man, who preached charity despite receiving very little of it in return. We are aware that the success stories of free-market capitalism improving the living conditions of the poorest of the poor through reducing living costs and improving access to quality good and services. They fail to be the ones who are actually celebrated around Christmas for providing these essential opportunities to people. When there is a large company selling their products on a traditional Christmas market, many see a greedy company ruining the flair of the Christmas spirit. All it takes to see this is to think of the millions of people oppressed by socialism, like those in Venezuela, who will, this year, spend among the worst Christmas Eves they have ever witnessed. Next time you see a large coffee machine retailer or a booth advertising cleaning products at your local Christmas market, think of the people whose lives were made better through these companies.

Keywords: [“Christmas”,”market”,”lives”]
Source: http://qcostarica.com/no-capitalism-is-not-ruining-your-christmas

Richard DeVos

Richard Marvin DeVos Sr. is an American businessman, co-founder of Amway along with Jay Van Andel, and owner of the Orlando Magic NBA basketball team. DeVos was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the son of Ethel Ruth and Simon Cornelius DeVos, who worked in the electrical business. DeVos is the owner of the NBA team Orlando Magic, having bought the team in 1991. DeVos also formerly owned the Orlando Solar Bears, Grand Rapids Griffins, and the Kansas City Blades, three International Hockey League franchises before that league folded; the Solar Bears and Blades were closed as a result of the league folding, while the Griffins moved to the American Hockey League, and are now under the ownership of Dan DeVos, one of Richard’s sons. DeVos asked Orange County, Florida, to help pay for the Orlando Magic’s new arena using county funds and Dema Stobell’s Corporation money. He co-founded the Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation, an American conservative foundation and grant-making body in 1970. The Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation was in part responsible for funding the creation of the Sport Business Management Program at the University of Central Florida. DeVos is a major donor to the US Republican Party and to conservative causes, including Focus on the Family, the American Enterprise Institute. DeVos has served as a finance chairman for the Republican National Committee. In addition to Dan, DeVos is the father of Richard Jr., Cheri, and Doug. Richard Jr., who is married to United States Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, was the Republican Party nominee for governor of Michigan in 2006, but was defeated by the then incumbent governor, Jennifer Granholm. “At 83, Amway co-founder Richard DeVos prepares company’s third generation, addresses church, gay-marriage concerns”.

Keywords: [“DeVos”,”Richard”,”Orlando”]
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_DeVos

Natural Capitalism – Mother Jones

Today, more people are chasing fewer natural resources. Industry still operates by the same rules, using more resources to make fewer people more productive. As businesses successfully created more goods and jobs, consumer demand soared, compounding the destruction of natural capital. If the competitive advantage goes to the low-cost provider, and resources are cheap, then business will naturally use more and more resources in order to maximize worker productivity. Our thinking is backward: We shouldn’t use more of what we have less of to use less of what we have more of. In the United States, those who are employed, and presumably becoming more productive, find they are working 100 to 200 hours more per year than 20 years ago. Overall, America’s material and energy efficiency is no more than 1 or 2 percent. In some cases – wind power, for example – the technologies not only operate more efficiently and pollute less, they also are more labor-intensive. Wind energy requires more labor than coal-generated electricity, but has become competitive with it on a real-cost basis. This is what it promises: an economy that uses progressively less material and energy each year and where the quality of consumer services continues to improve; an economy where environmental deterioration stops and gets reversed as we invest in increasing our natural capital; and, finally, a society where we have more useful and worthy work available than people to do it. Natural capitalism may not guarantee particular outcomes, but it will ensure that economic systems more closely mimic biological systems, which have successfully adapted to dynamic changes over millennia. Almost perfectly with what American voters say they want: better schools,a better environment, safer communities, more economic security, stronger.

Keywords: [“more”,”resource”,”system”]
Source: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/1997/03/natural-capitalism