J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 07-24-2018

How the racial caste system got restored

Michelle Alexander’s book, The New Jim Crow, is a must-read for anyone trying to come to grips with the explosive growth of America’s prison population in the past three decades-and how this growth relates to the racial disparity in imprisonment. Alexander describes how the two prior systems of racial control, slavery and Jim Crow, functioned to create a racial underclass. Just as the white elite had successfully driven a wedge between poor whites and blacks following Bacon’s Rebellion by creating the institution of black slavery, another racial caste system was emerging nearly two centuries later, in part due to efforts by white elites to decimate a multiracial alliance of poor people. The bulk of The New Jim Crow is an account of how this new system of racial control has been constructed. Often the racial biases in these decisions are less the work of outright bigotry than unconscious racial stereotypes, which, as noted, have been widely promoted by politicians and the media. 

As Alexander documents, a series of Supreme Court rulings have effectively shut the courthouse doors to claims of racial bias in the criminal justice system. The system of mass incarceration is now, for all practical purposes, thoroughly immunized from claims of racial bias. Alexander goes on to show how this system of racial control operates beyond the prison cell as the criminal label follows millions of people of color for the rest of their lives. This officially colorblind system goes a long way in explaining how we have come to this moment in which a Black president can oversee a system that locks up millions of Black men. If the movement that emerges to challenge mass incarceration fails to confront squarely the critical role of race in the basic structure of society, and if it fails to cultivate an ethic of genuine care, compassion, and concern for every human being-of every class, race, and nationality-within our nation’s borders, the collapse of mass incarceration will not mean the death of racial caste in America. 

Inevitably a new system of racialized social control will emerge-one that we cannot foresee just as the current system of mass incarceration was not predicted by anyone thirty years ago. No task is more urgent for racial justice advocates today than ensuring that America’s current racial caste system is its last. 

Keywords: [“racial”,”system”,”drug”]
Source: https://isreview.org/issue/73/how-racial-caste-system-got-restored

SparkNotes: Great Expectations: Themes

The moral theme of Great Expectations is quite simple: affection, loyalty, and conscience are more important than social advancement, wealth, and class. Dickens establishes the theme and shows Pip learning this lesson, largely by exploring ideas of ambition and self-improvement-ideas that quickly become both the thematic center of the novel and the psychological mechanism that encourages much of Pip’s development. At heart, Pip is an idealist; whenever he can conceive of something that is better than what he already has, he immediately desires to obtain the improvement. Ambition and self-improvement take three forms in Great Expectations-moral, social, and educational; these motivate Pip’s best and his worst behavior throughout the novel. Significantly, Pip’s life as a gentleman is no more satisfying-and certainly no more moral-than his previous life as a blacksmith’s apprentice. 

Ultimately, through the examples of Joe, Biddy, and Magwitch, Pip learns that social and educational improvement are irrelevant to one’s real worth and that conscience and affection are to be valued above erudition and social standing. Throughout Great Expectations, Dickens explores the class system of Victorian England, ranging from the most wretched criminals to the poor peasants of the marsh country to the middle class to the very rich. From the handcuffs Joe mends at the smithy to the gallows at the prison in London, the imagery of crime and criminal justice pervades the book, becoming an important symbol of Pip’s inner struggle to reconcile his own inner moral conscience with the institutional justice system. In general, just as social class becomes a superficial standard of value that Pip must learn to look beyond in finding a better way to live his life, the external trappings of the criminal justice system become a superficial standard of morality that Pip must learn to look beyond to trust his inner conscience. Magwitch frightens Pip at first simply because he is a convict, and Pip feels guilty for helping him because he is afraid of the police. 

By the end of the book Pip has discovered Magwitch’s inner nobility, and is able to disregard his external status as a criminal. As Pip has learned to trust his conscience and to value Magwitch’s inner character, he has replaced an external standard of value with an internal one. 

Keywords: [“Pip”,”social”,”class”]
Source: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/greatex/themes

Normalizing Male Dominance: Gender Representation in 2012 Films

Our analysis looks at films by genres, with some concluding remarks about gender roles and examples of male and female characters that were less objectified and represented gender roles that were more human or outside of the narrow gender roles of most films. Looking at the 53 films in the category of gender representation, we see that the majority of characters were male, and only 7 were female. Women are constantly being misrepresented in these films, shown for purposes of objectification, support of the male characters, and mostly as love interests that drive the male characters. In President Evil and Underworld, the lead females characters are strong and confident, but one is a vampire who is looking for her male partner and the lead female character in Resident Evil is often sexualized by the way she is dressed. We see animated film gender stereotypes here, a young boy being the main character, his dog being male, his role model in the film being a the male science teacher, his mother being overly protective and the villain, of sorts, being the cranky male neighbor/mayor of the town. 

The first three characters that appear on screen are male characters. The main male character Ted, voiced by Zac Efron, lives with his mom and grandmother and does not have a father figure, which is interesting, since in a large number of children films, the maternal character is missing. In Wreck-It Ralph, the relationships between male and female characters are portrayed as much more of a partnership than we see in many other movies, where one, mostly male, character is dominating another, usually female, character. There is the opportunity for the movie to have a stereotypical lesbian character, and it seems like they will head down that path with the character of Sergeant Calhoun; however, she works closely with another male character, Felix and the two become romantically involved. It is a heartwarming film that challenges some gender roles, but in the end Amy Adams character finds another male love interest and plays the role of the female fixer in a dysfunctional family. 

In The Five Year Engagement we see a bit of gender parity, the movie focusing equally on the main male and female characters. In the end, they do switch traditional gender roles, and the main female character proposes to the main male character. 

Keywords: [“character”,”film”,”male”]
Source: https://griid.org/2013/02/12/normalizing-male-dominance-gender…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 06-07-2018


Compassionate Capitalism With David Meltzer

Social welfare: Between capitalism & Islam – The Muslimah Diaries

Zakiah A. Welfare in Britain has had a long and tumultuous journey; from parishes and poorhouses to a pension for over 70s, the social care system has taken many forms. Over the years the service has grown to include housing, Jobseeker’s Allowance, disability allowance, child benefits and other various pockets of social welfare depending on local councils and their own allocation of funds. Britain’s social services have never enjoyed the spotlight as much as they do now, and with sensationalized articles telling us how badly our benefits system is being abused with alarming regularity, it’s no wonder. The single mother with more children than she can afford; the lay-about with no job; the drug-addict spending their monthly allowance on a single high; the immigrant using their benefits cheques to build a villa in their home country, are but a few well-recognised stereotypes of the people using and abusing the UK social welfare system – and the reason why cuts to this sector should be justified. 

In the 7thcentury there were so few people who needed benefits that the national treasury had no one to give money to. People paid 2.5% of their income towards taxation and were advised to make use of their assets or risk having them repossessed by the state. So though it was not private villas and paradise for everyone across the board, a system was in place to ensure people’s basic needs were being met. The Islam economic system bans hoarding of wealth and has policies, which prevent certain monopolies in order to actively encourage circulation and distribution of wealth. Caring for the less fortunate and donating wealth to charity is also lauded as a positive thing with immeasurable benefits in a future life and a sense of responsibility to help others insteadof fearing a loss of their own wealth by doing so. 

These few regulations barely scratch the surface of the depth of the economic system Islam advocates. It is already clear that unlike capitalism, Islam views people are not just workhorses or consumers who should be responsible for their own success or downfall but members of a society who should be looking out for their collective well-being. No matter which silver-tongued politician/too-tanned buffoon/down-to-earth rebel is head of the government, you cannot escape the truth of the system; the rules of the game are set. 

Keywords: [“system”,”people”,”wealth”]
Source: https://themuslimahdiaries.com/2018/05/02/social-welfare-between…

Larsen: The U.S. can’t fund compassion if it has no money

When the math itself comes into question, we are left to partisan interpretations – and that creates a polarizing situation. Such is the case in an exchange between a liberal Nobel Prize-winning economist and two respected conservative policy analysts. There is one mathematical projection earning consensus from the likes of PolitiFact, the Heritage Foundation, Business Insider, U.S. News and the Weekly Standard: Entitlement spending is out of control, and within the next 20 years, the three major entitlements – Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid – along with interest on the national debt, will consume 100 percent of all tax revenue. That fact demands that we move beyond politicized interpretation and get to real solutions, because if entitlements and debt consume all tax revenue, our stability and compassion as a nation are at risk. 

It’s been five decades since President Lyndon Johnson launched the War on Poverty. After $25 trillion spent on programs, the U.S. poverty rate has not changed much, and our nation is still home to about 43 million people living in poverty. Both parties already concede we might rethink how we assist the poor, and there are indications that welfare reforms have worked. Second would be a walk in the shoes of the other side: If liberals really care about ending poverty – and I believe they do – they should be the most steadfast of budget hawks, ensuring not one dime that could help the poor be lost to fraud and growing bureaucracy. 

They should acknowledge that poverty ends – really ends – only when people become self-sufficient. Unless we return to the notion of welfare as temporary, there will be nothing left for those who are truly in need of long-term assistance. Third, majority conservatives should demonstrate compassion by ending corporate welfare, balancing the budget, privatizing functions better left to the private sector and updating the tax code in a meaningful way. Brookings Institute research shows that poverty is complex, with at least five major contributing causes: work rates, wages, family composition, education and immigration. 

Keywords: [“poverty”,”welfare”,”left”]
Source: https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900013660/larsen-the-us-cant…

John Hawkins’ Right Wing News

Liberals view themselves as good people because they’re liberals. 1) Only liberals would be cruel enough to pick on kids running lemonade stands with a permit, children putting on Christmas plays at school and the Boy Scouts. 4) Liberals are actually bothered by people who do love America. 8) Liberals believe in taking money from people who earn it, handing it out as bribes in order to get more power and then using that power to hurt the people that are giving them money. 10) Liberals view hooking people on welfare and food stamps as a core part of their election strategy, which is terrible for the country, shows they have no character and requires more than a little hatred for poor people. 11) The dumbest, most close-minded and mean spirited people in all of politics are inevitably liberals who are convinced they’re brilliant, open-minded and compassionate because they call themselves liberals. 12) A policy that makes liberals feel superior and caring that doesn’t work and wastes billions is considered a smashing success because they genuinely DON’T CARE WHETHER THEIR POLICIES ACTUALLY HELP PEOPLE OR NOT. 13) The same liberal who pretends to be angry about Susan Smith or Casey Anthony will then turn around and give the thumbs up to women who do the same thing to their children via abortion. It’s because the kid’s parents are interested in educating him while his liberal teachers view public schools as just another way to indoctrinate children. Down the road, after liberals finally join everyone else, they try to claim that conservatives still support all the practices that we fought liberals on from the beginning. 19) Liberals think black Americans are inferior to whites, which is why the worst, most crime-ridden places to live in America are inevitably run by liberals. That’s acceptable to liberals because they don’t think black Americans deserve any better. 20) A liberal is more likely to support a man who murders a cop like Mumia Abu Jamal than cops who want to regularly patrol a bad neighborhood in force to keep the criminals from terrorizing the innocent people who live there. 

Keywords: [“liberal”,”people”,”think”]
Source: http://rightwingnews.com/john-hawkins/25-reasons-to-dislike-liberals

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-21-2018

Why are Tibetan Buddhists so Compassionate?

In the 21st century, compassion can often be perceived as weakness. Compassion is the ability to display genuine concern for the suffering of others. One of the greatest examples of compassion in today’s world is the nation of Tibet. The old monk replied that on one occasion, he had allowed his anger to overcome his love, kindness, and compassion for his oppressors. The answer is rooted in the Buddhist principles of compassion loving-kindness, and non-harming. 

In other words, the highest virtue is to become a bodhisattva, loving every being as a mother loves their only child, and living in harmony with the supreme jewel of compassion, bodhicitta. Last year, a Buddhist nun told me several stories about Lama Zopa Rinpoche, the master of Kopan Monastery in Nepal, who truly embodies this universal compassion and maternal love for all living beings. We don’t all have the chance to live in the Himalayan foothills as we explore the way of compassion. For those of us who work in high street shops and office blocks, sending emails to disgruntled clients and dealing with dissatisfied customers and spending hours commuting at rush hour, Rinpoche’s level of universal compassion seems like an impossible goal. No. 

The way to compassion is simply a matter of switching perspective, from self-cherishing to universal compassion. For them, a life committed to compassion makes much more sense than a life dedicated to ourselves. Just one act of genuine compassion can leads to positive results immediately-not just for others, but for ourselves. 

Keywords: [“compassion”,”suffered”,”Lama”]
Source: https://www.elephantjournal.com/2018/03/why-are-tibetan-buddhists…

Capitalism Archives

Popular media paints a bleak picture of capitalism and touts the benefits of socialist values. Many benefits available to you and the American way of life are only possible in a capitalistic economic system. I want you to take away a viewpoint that capitalism is a positive, compassionate system. Seek out, read and become informed about the fundamentals of Capitalism. Realize how the application of the principles will benefit you and then decide to engage the system to your benefit. 

An article by Sarah Kendzior in Foreign Policy magazine details many reasons that young Americans are believed to be giving up on capitalism. While that article was a gut punch, it exposes many of the maladies of the past eight years or so that have caused young Americans to begin doubting our system. They have begun to feel like our system might not be the best, despite not having personal exposure to a longstanding socialist economic system. As you read the Paladin About page, you will find that this blog is all about promoting Capitalism. One of the blessings that I have enjoyed in my life is the opportunity to travel the world and gain first-hand knowledge of political-economic systems different from my own. 

This exposure has reinforced the belief that America has The Best Economic System at its core. It is my belief that if the principles of capitalism were studied and employed by every American, many of the maladies mentioned in Kendzior’s article would have self-corrected. 

Keywords: [“system”,”capitalism”,”American”]
Source: https://paladin4prosperity.com/category/financial-wisdom/capitalism

Do you think capitalism can be compatible with the beliefs in equality and compassion?

That would be Marxism you are searching for, where each man performs only to the level of his ability; he then receives from what is taken from other men, according to his needs and according to their ability. The man of greater ability soon begins to realize that he is being cheated, and he feigns a lower level of competency, raising his level of incompetency. Now, he too is receiving more from people who perform more, and is giving less to people who perform more incompetently–or who perform not at all. Eventually, all the greater achievers shrug, feign a higher level of incompetency, and all men are thus equal–finally! It doesn’t matter to the social engineers that everyone is now using candles because the men of high competency are pretending to be equals with the men of low competency. 

It cannot hurt anyone anymore, because no one is willing to risk his capital if the rewards that are equal to his effort are judged the same as the rewards of those who do not risk rising to higher level of competency. Capitalism is not compatible with that kind of equality and compassion. Capitalism is the only economic system that rewards men for raising their level of competency. Sometimes a man reaches his level of incompetency simply because he is unwilling to gain either more education or more experience. This is perfectly in keeping with his equal rights to achieve only what he wishes to achieve. 

Keywords: [“man”,”level”,”equal”]
Source: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100404050808AAZZDJU

The Great Philosophers 9: Max Weber

Max Weber is one of the three philosophers best able to explain to us the peculiar economic system we live within called Capitalism. Born in Erfurt in Germany in 1864, Weber grew up to see his country convulsed by the dramatic changes ushered in by the Industrial Revolution. Weber senior died the next day and the son believed he might inadvertently have killed him. Weber had to give up his university job and lay more or less mute on a sofa for two years. Max Weber had the sort of life that his contemporary, Freud, was born to address. 

Weber alleged, Protestants are left with heightened feelings of anxiety as well as life-long guilty desires to prove their virtue before a severe, all-seeing but silent God. In this analysis, Weber was in direct disagreement with Karl Marx, for Marx had proposed a materialist view of Capitalism, whereas Weber now advanced an idealist one. The argument between Weber and Marx pivoted around the role of religion. Weber didn’t believe that the only way to be a successful Capitalist country was actually to convert to Protestantism. Today Weber would counsel those who wish to spread Capitalism to concentrate on our equivalent of religion: culture. 

Weber is pessimistic about all such hopes, for they are misaligned with the reality of how the modern world works. Weber encourages us to see that change is not so much impossible as complicated and slow. 

Keywords: [“Weber”,”Capitalism”,”work”]
Source: http://thephilosophersmail.com/perspective/the-great-philosophers-9-max-weber

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 05-18-2018

Revolution from Within

A New Take on FCC!As we transmute the 3-letter organizations who no longer serve us, we the people, globally, let’s turn FCC into this simple affirmation: FREEDOM * CREATIVITY * COMPASSION. InterviewsListen to the author, Catherine Baird, explore the background behind Revolution from Within and how these ideas of freedom, creativity and compassion are just as relevant for Western society today as they were for a Russia terrorized by Bolshevik tyranny. Learn more about why Lenin ruthlessly exiled 160 intellectuals in 1922. The plots, controversial ideas, the untold history of the first dissidents to Bolshevism. How Revolution from Within started from the very beginning of the USSR until, finally, in the 1980s it burst through the concrete walls of communism’s faceless collective. 

Embark upon a voyage with The 160 to explore the psyche of a nation at one of the greatest turning points in history! Follow the unexpected twists and turns of these dauntless personalities … founding fathers of Perestroika, Glasnost’ and a world after Communism … to gain a glimpse of the formidable ideas that have helped shape a culture both inside and outside of Russia today promoting human rights, federalism, unity consciousness, free markets and local sovereignty. Freedom, Creativity and Compassion sit at the heart of this book as the author ties the events from over a century ago back to parallels occurring today. 

This is a story of how 160 completely unique activists, philosophers, and politicians kept alive the key tenets of a natively Russian worldview and, with the help of a most unlikely sponsor – the American YMCA – preserved their culture and beliefs for more than three generations until finally they could at last find acceptance once more. 

Keywords: [“Russian”,”more”,”today”]
Source: http://www.catherinebairdbooks.com

Capitalism: The Inner Battle

We live our lives through stories that reinforce certain values and beliefs. When a critical mass of individuals lets go of these stories, a tipping point is reached, and the scaffold collapses. A cascade of individuals like Newton let go of the story that slavery was acceptable, and change rapidly accelerated. Capitalism is a similarly constructed story, a collection of social perceptions that create a dominant world view. It’s easy to see capitalism as a system external to ourselves, but it’s much harder to acknowledge the stories we carry inside of ourselves that create and reinforce the values that sustain it. 

These beliefs produce a pervasive sense of powerlessness, and the story that’s erected around them-the story of capitalism-inevitably becomes a narrative of fear and domination. Trying to change these institutions without altering the stories that underpin them won’t create the paradigm shift that’s required to alter our self-destructive course. That reinforces the problem, especially when stories are founded on fear since people hold on tighter whenever they feel threatened. I found my own ‘hand of grace’ in books by Cordova, Charles Eisenstein and others who are writing new stories to replace the old. I believe that a tipping point to a new paradigm beyond capitalism will only be reached when enough individuals and communities rewrite their stories in this way. 

Local food economies create greater self-reliance in communities, and help people to develop an internal locus of control that can free them from fear and the urge for domination, thus creating the new values and beliefs that can sustain a different economic system. We can help by encouraging each other with new stories that describe a different sense of what it means to be human in the world. 

Keywords: [“story”,”system”,”people”]
Source: http://occupywallstreet.net/story/capitalism-inner-battle

Ma’ikwe Ludwig – Cooperative Culture Pioneer

Ma’ikwe Ludwig’s work integrates ecological, economic, social, political and personal approaches and technologies for a holistic view of what real cooperation and sustainability take. Ma’ikwe is a dynamic, compassionate and thoughtful speaker and teacher, and a minister committed to creating a world that supports the well-being and vibrancy of all beings. Her 2013 TEDx talk set the ball in motion for a major speaking tour in 2015, and she regularly does interviews, speaking gigs, facilitation work and trainings. She lives in Laramie, WY where a group of fellow economic radicals are working on starting an income-sharing ecovillage in the belly of the fossil fuel beast. Ma’ikwe’s latest book is Together Resilient: Building Community in the Age of Climate Disruption. 

Ma’ikwe Ludwig is a long-time cooperative culture theorist, practitioner and advocate. She started her consulting firm, Sol Space Consulting in 2002. She is a consensus facilitator and regularly works with intentional communities and nonprofits who are wanting to have more inclusive, relationship-deepening and efficient group process. Ma’ikwe is currently working on The Cooperative Culture Handbook with fellow practitioners Jamaica Stevens and Adam Wolpert. Ma’ikwe is one of a handful of national experts on intentional community who actively teach and consult. 

She has lived in community for 20 years, is a regular contributor to Communities magazine and a member of the Board of Directors of the Fellowship for Intentional Community, and started doing anti-classism work in 2015. She promotes income sharing, public finance, alternative currencies and a host of other economic solutions to ending capitalism and privatization, and creating a cooperative, locally self-determined economy in their place. 

Keywords: [“Ma'ikwe”,”work”,”Community”]
Source: http://maikwe.org

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-25-2018

Anti-Capitalism in Five Minutes

Arguing against capitalism, we’re told, is simply crazy. We are told, over and over, that capitalism is not just the system we have, but the only system we can ever have. We should be searching for ways to explain to co-workers in water-cooler conversations – radical politics in five minutes or less – why we must abandon predatory corporate capitalism. Capitalism is admittedly an incredibly productive system that has created a flood of goods unlike anything the world has ever seen. Capitalism has given those of us in the First World lots of stuff in exchange for our souls, our hope for progressive politics, and the possibility of a decent future for children. 

If we understand democracy as a system that gives ordinary people a meaningful way to participate in the formation of public policy, rather than just a role in ratifying decisions made by the powerful, then it’s clear that capitalism and democracy are mutually exclusive. Capitalism is a system based on the idea of unlimited growth. Capitalism is not, of course, the only unsustainable system that humans have devised, but it is the most obviously unsustainable system, and it’s the one in which we are stuck. If there is no alternative, anyone who questions capitalism is crazy. Remember TINA: There is no alternative to predatory corporate capitalism. 

To be realistic we are told we must capitulate to a system that steals our souls, enslaves us to concentrated power, and will someday destroy the planet. What is truly crazy is falling for the con that an inhuman, anti-democratic, and unsustainable system – one that leaves half the world’s people in abject poverty – is all that there is, all that there ever can be, all that there ever will be. 

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”system”,”such”]
Source: https://www.counterpunch.org/…/04/30/anti-capitalism-in-five-minutes

List of political ideologies

In social studies, a political ideology is a certain set of ethical ideals, principles, doctrines, myths or symbols of a social movement, institution, class or large group that explains how society should work and offers some political and cultural blueprint for a certain social order. A political ideology largely concerns itself with how to allocate power and to what ends it should be used. Some political parties follow a certain ideology very closely while others may take broad inspiration from a group of related ideologies without specifically embracing any one of them. Typically, each ideology contains certain ideas on what it considers to be the best form of government and the best economic system. Ideologies tend to identify themselves by their position on the political spectrum, though this is very often controversial. 

Finally, ideologies can be distinguished from political strategies and from single issues that a party may be built around. There are several studies that show that political ideology is heritable within families. The following list is strictly alphabetical and attempts to divide the ideologies found in practical political life into a number of groups and each group contains ideologies that are related to each other. The headers refer to names of the best-known ideologies in each group. They are merely noting that the ideologies in question are practically, historically and ideologically related to each other. 

One ideology can belong to several groups and there is sometimes considerable overlap between related ideologies. A b Ecofascism was the Ideology of the minor parties: The Greens of Austria, Green Party of Hungary and the Liberal Ecologist Party in Switzerland. 

Keywords: [“ideology”,”political”,”group”]
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_ideologies

A Universal Basic Income is capitulation to capitalism

A UBI works as an unconditional payment for all working adults, regardless of age, ability, gender, skills or employment status, so that they can continue to consume even while jobs disappear. While sovereign governments can certainly afford a UBI, simply throwing money at a problem, instead of addressing its root cause presents serious concerns. Second, a UBI is designed to work as a partial or complete substitute for existing welfare and social security programs. Former tech executive, and Presidential candidate, Andrew Yang told the New York times that a UBI is necessary for capitalism to continue. A UBI is a smokescreen for the destruction of the social safety net. 

The godfather of neoliberalism himself, Milton Friedman, argued in his book Capitalism and Freedom that a UBI is an efficient way to eliminate and privatise public sector programs including welfare, social security, the minimum wage, public health, housing, hospitals, pensions and aged-care. A UBI has the potential to further drive down wages. Some advocates claim a UBI empowers workers to reject jobs with insufficient compensation. To the contrary, a UBI that covers the cost of living creates zero incentive for employers to provide wages that do the same and encourages the continuation of outsourcing. A UBI is expensive & barely makes a dent in working-age poverty. 

Experts have predicted a UBI could cost anywhere between 6.5%, to 35% of GDP, but barely makes a dent in working-aged poverty which would decline by less than 2%, according to a report by Compass, by less than 1% for pensioners. Though child poverty could decline from 16-9%, a UBI still doesn’t deliver the necessary bang for the government’s buck. 

Keywords: [“UBI”,”work”,”job”]
Source: https://renegadeinc.com/universal-basic-income-capitulation-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-12-2018

What is Communism?

Communism works the day people dare to open their minds, hearts and everything there is to open, and lay down all kinds of judgment. As the world is now, communism will never work, and the beginning of world wide communism would have to be fitted to every area, but in time they all would work for a common goal and the science will move a lot faster than it does today. Communism offers rich leaders and all poor people; it is a failed ideology. In Communism, people would work because they would know the necessity of their and work, if they refused to work they would not benefit from the labor of others. The closest thing a Communism would have to a government would be councils elected by the people, councils which would be kept under control by the people; they would have no real power or authority. Some people hate the rich and some cops hate rich people and they want communism. Communism would work in its purest form if people were mere machines. Communism can’t work because people have different talents and skills, thus people can’t all be equal, or classless. Communism strips the power of the people; there is no freedom as all the media is censored, which in turn limits freedom of expression. What people need to understand is that there is idealistic communism, and then there is the reality: corrupt dictatorships posing as communism, which is in fact the opposite of the idealistic people’s rule. According the definition of communism by the man who coined the phrase, communism *is* stateless and classless. Most of people outside really scared of communism will go into the people mind and try to get rid of it.

Keywords: [“communism”,”people”,”work”]
Source: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-communism

CAPITALISM AND COMPASSION: a test of Milbrath

Summary – From his observations of environmentalists Milbrath extracts the generalization that there is something inimical between capitalism and compassion. Clearly, Milbrath believes that capitalism and altruistic compassion are fundamentally at odds with one-another. If capitalism and altruistic compassion are opposed, then it should follow that those who feel at home with capitalism and support it will be less altruistic and compassionate. In the subsequent 1983 State election voters had a 3-way choice — between a Leftist party and two conservative parties. There could be no doubt that a vote for the National party was a vote for capitalism. Conservatives who were less confident in the virtue of capitalism could vote for the Liberal party. The differential degree of altruism shown by the supporters of the three main parties in this election should therefore provide a fairly finely-tuned test of Milbrath’s hypothesis. If Milbrath is right, the National party voters should show especially low scores on the compassionate altruism scale and especially high scores on the `AO’ scale. RESULTS. The contrast of chief interest was thought to lie between the National party voters and the Labor party voters. National voters were significantly more ambitious and Labor voters were significantly more compassionate. Voters for the other conservative party showed mean scores on altruism almost identical to those of Labor voters and mean scores on achievement orientation almost identical to National voters. Many quite compassionate people vote in Queensland for a fanatical champion of capitalism.

Keywords: [“vote”,”party”,”CAPITALISM”]
Source: http://jonjayray.com/milbrath.html

compassionate capitalism Archives

That’s a small number, nearly insignificant, but if every company dedicated just 1% of its revenues and time to the community around it, the difference would be monumental. A business is not an island; it’s the product of the community it was formed in, and its enduring success is dependent on that same community. This idea is at odds with the way many companies do business. It’s accepted that many corporations are more concerned with profits than with the community or environment surrounding it. That’s enough to fix up a local park, keep a food pantry stocked for months, or divide between a few local charities. This practice doesn’t just take the cooperation of a few huge corporations; it takes small businesses, too. If enough small businesses joined together, donating a fraction of their revenue and some of their time, they could help prevent children from going hungry by sponsoring community gardens. They could clean up their neighborhoods and make their towns and cities a cleaner, safer place to live, or support a local animal shelter, or host workshops to teach career skills to local students or unemployed community members. They sound like such small things, but when all of these small things add up, they become an unstoppable movement of compassion and gratitude. There are also tangible benefits for businesses, such as an improved business profile as members of the community associate the business with its involvement. You may be just one person, or the leader of a small business. Even a small percentage can have a lasting positive effect on your surrounding area.

Keywords: [“community”,”small”,”business”]
Source: http://www.legendsleadershipconcepts.com/tag/compassionate-capitalism

Capitalism and compassion: Can they coexist? – SD Monitor News

In a free market, the bottom line is simply, the bottom line. Capitalism has become largely about self-interest, consumerism, sleight of hand and the bottom line. A person may be able to provide financially, but not emotionally – because the two systems are often disjointed. In a system that is profit driven, the raw material for intimacy and connection is rarely cultivated or valued. Fact is, business is personal, and sterilizing the brutal impacts of self-interested economics through such phraseology does not shelter us. Poverty has an impact on both physical and mental health. As the middle class founders and people blame themselves for their fiscal woes, which in turn may be associated with higher levels of stress, as well as depression, anxiety and maladaptive coping, the impacts of a system based solely on a bottom line which benefits a few appear to be bad for the mental health of many. Our economic and incentivization systems are a set-up for failure and disappointment for those who are the most vulnerable to experience the worst outcomes. The free market system has become the bellwether of myriad systems in our culture – educational, commercial, media, medical and spiritual. It becomes difficult to teach children empathy and emotional regulation when the system into which they are being acculturated does not value these qualities. Because the system does not equitably provide opportunity across all socioeconomic strata. As the cultural, economic and political needles move, so too does mental health.

Keywords: [“system”,”economic”,”impact”]
Source: https://sdmonitornews.com/2018/02/27/capitalism-and-compassion-can…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-10-2018

The Pursuit of Equal Income Distribution

During the last decades, the great weaknesses of capitalism have flourished. Inequality of income distribution has worsened painfully, the gap between rich and poor widens more and more every day, and just a few lucky entrepreneurs in the world are able to enjoy the capital benefits of the global system. Hunger, poverty, demographic explosion, ageing, and unbridled mass migration, among other factors, have become critical social dilemmas directly related to capitalist deviations, all of which cause us to foresee a chaotic world scenario in the near future. The numbers shown in this article confirm that the world’s economic disparity, instead of diminishing, is increasing at an alarming rate. Since the world economy completely depends on capitalism, this system is still extremely powerful and influential in global decision-making, thus further aggravating economic disparity. As it is not possible to avoid the capitalist system, we will make proposals that are feasible for implementing within the current capitalist tendencies in order to alleviate global imbalance. Compassionate Capitalism is an alternative that promotes flexibilization of the system in order to make it more sustainable. It seeks to diminish corporate control over the economy and markets by regaining the State’s economic intervention so that profits are fairly redistributed for the common welfare. The information used for the study is based on the most recent international reports and global circumstances of the topics in question. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To make sure that you can receive messages from us, please add ‘julypress.com’ domain to your e-mail ‘safe list’. If you do not receive e-mail in your ‘inbox’, check your ‘bulk mail’ or ‘junk mail’ folders.

Keywords: [“system”,”global”,”world”]
Source: http://journal.julypress.com/index.php/ajsss/article/view/262

Two-faced capitalism

Good corporate citizenship is a theme of the Davos celebrations. Admittedly, even fewer, just 5%, named CSR in its own right as the single most important criterion; but one might add to this the additional 24% who said that the reputation and integrity of the brand, to which good corporate citizenship presumably contributes, matter most. From an ethical point of view, the problem with conscientious CSR is obvious: it is philanthropy at other people’s expense. Advocates of CSR typically respond that this misses the point: corporate virtue is good for profits. The trouble is, CSR that pays dividends, so to speak, is unlikely to impress the people whose complaints first put CSR on the board’s agenda. Profit-maximising CSR does not silence the critics, which was the initial aim; CSR that is not profit-maximising might silence the critics but is unethical. In a new book, co-written with Karen Southwick, Mr Benioff argues that corporate philanthropy, done right, transforms the culture of the firm concerned*. Unlike some advocates of CSR, Mr Benioff says he opposes government mandates to undertake such activities. In any case, if Mr Benioff is right, and CSR done wisely helps businesses succeed, compulsion should not be needed. Lack of compulsion is exactly what is wrong with current approaches to CSR, say many of the NGOs that first put firms on the spot for their supposedly unethical practices. CSR was conjured up in the first place because government action was deemed inadequate: orthodox politics was a sham, so pressure had to be put directly on firms by organised protest. Ten years on, instead of declaring victory, as well they might, disenchanted NGOs like Christian Aid are coming to regard CSR as the greater sham, and are calling on governments to resume their duties.

Keywords: [“CSR”,”corporate”,”firm”]
Source: https://www.economist.com/node/2369912

compassionate capitalism

Over the years, Mr. Whittaker’s Christian ecumenical humanitarian organization, Opportunity International, has lived up to its growing reputation of giving the poor an alternative to charity. Today, this non-profit group creates entrepreneurial empowerment by providing loans and job training directly to poor people at the grassroots level. By 2007, the organization plans to finance 1 million poor entrepreneurs per year; and by 2010 its goal is to finance 2 million people per year into their own businesses. 98 percent of its clients pay their loans back on time and at market-rate interest! Notions that the poor are not creditworthy are shattered by this reality. Given access to credit and capital, capitalism can be democratized. People must be able to feed themselves and their families. For the majority of the world’s hungry people, food is available. Microfinance is the jumpstart so many people need to begin the process of meeting their most basic human needs; and then, accumulated capital can be saved and invested towards purchasing a home and property to begin the process of real wealth-building. When people are economically deprived, they can be politically and culturally deprived as well. We also know that poverty represents a breeding ground for terrorism, emanating from people’s feelings of desperation. The bottom line is that we must do more to narrow that gap between the rich and poor in our world. When we tap into one of the key economic forces that have made America great, namely, venture capital to energize the spirit of entrepreneurship, and harness it with compassion in the form of credit for the working poor – we have a formula for ending chronic poverty.

Keywords: [“people”,”poor”,”property”]
Source: https://steveparkhurst.wordpress.com/tag/compassionate-capitalism

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 04-06-2018

Jordan Peterson & Fascist Mysticism

12 Rules for Life is only Peterson’s second book in twenty years. Packaged for people brought up on BuzzFeed listicles, Peterson’s brand of intellectual populism has risen with stunning velocity; and it is boosted, like the political populisms of our time, by predominantly male and frenzied followers, who seem ever-ready to pummel his critics on social media. Peterson diagnoses this crisis as a loss of faith in old verities. Closer examination reveals Peterson’s ageless insights as a typical, if not archetypal, product of our own times: right-wing pieties seductively mythologized for our current lost generations. In all respects, Peterson’s ancient wisdom is unmistakably modern. These neo-romantics were responding, in the same way as Peterson, to an urgent need, springing from a traumatic experience of social and economic modernity, to believe-in whatever reassures and comforts. Peterson’s own lineage among these healers of modern man’s soul can be traced through his repeatedly invoked influences: not only Carl Jung, but also Mircea Eliade, the Romanian scholar of religion, and Joseph Campbell, a professor at Sarah Lawrence College, who, like Peterson, combined a conventional academic career with mass-market musings on heroic individuals. Peterson seems to have modelled his public persona on Jung rather than Campbell. Peterson may seem the latest in a long line of eggheads pretentiously but harmlessly romancing the noble savage. Peterson’s revered mentor, was a zealous Russian expansionist, who denounced Ukraine’s independence and hailed Vladimir Putin as the right man to lead Russia’s overdue regeneration. Nowhere in his published writings does Peterson reckon with the moral fiascos of his gurus and their political ramifications; he seems unbothered by the fact that thinking of human relations in such terms as dominance and hierarchy connects too easily with such nascent viciousness such as misogyny, anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. Like Peterson, many of these hyper-masculinist thinkers saw compassion as a vice and urged insecure men to harden their hearts against the weak on the grounds that the latter were biologically and culturally inferior.

Keywords: [“Peterson”,”intellectual”,”Jung”]
Source: http://nybooks.com/daily/2018/03/19/jordan-peterson-and-fascist-mysticism

Quotations about or by Capitalism

The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries. Women’s sexy underwear is a minor but significant growth industry of late-twentieth-century Britain in the twilight of capitalism. The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries. It is impossible for capitalism to survive, primarily because the system of capitalism needs some blood to suck. Years later, Amanda used the woodpecker experiment as a model for understanding capitalism, Communism, Christianity, and all other systems that traffic in future rewards rather than in present realities. Feminism is a socialist, anti-family, political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians. Capitalism is a system in which the central institutions of society are in principle under autocratic control. If the world is lucky enough to enjoy peace, it may even one day make the discovery, to the horror of doctrinaire free-enterprisers and doctrinaire planners alike, that what is called capitalism and what is called socialism are both capable of working quite well. Predatory capitalism created a complex industrial system and an advanced technology; it permitted a considerable extension of democratic practice and fostered certain liberal values, but within limits that are now being pressed and must be overcome. Under capitalism man exploits man under socialism the reverse is true. The problem with capitalism is that it best rewards the worst part of us: the ruthless, competitive, cunning, opportunistic, aquisitive drives, giving little reward and often much punishment – or at least much handicap – to honesty, compassion, fair play, many forms of hard work, love of justice, and a concern for those in need. All fingers are not alike, If you cut bigger ones to make all equal it is communism, If you stretch smaller ones to make all equal it is socialism, If you do nothing to make all equal it is capitalism.

Keywords: [“capitalism”,”system”,”call”]
Source: https://www.poetrysoup.com/quotes/capitalism

Compassionate Capitalist Online Radio

Karen Rands, a true Venture Catalyst, shares her insights about Connecting Companies with Capital and Capital with Companies. This show engages the Early Stage Sophisticated Investor and Angel Investor Community and inspiring Entrepreneurs as a source for info of interest to both investors and entrepreneurs. Become a loyal listener and spread the word to business owners and investors you know! Karen as a presenter, author, and CEO has been involved in the early stage private equity space since 2001. When Karen speaks, people listen to what she has to say about creating wealth through entrepreneurship and private investment! Karen Rands, founder of the Compassionate Capitalist Movement for Angel Investors, talks with author Mark Faust, trusted advisor to Corporate Executive Teams and author of Growth or Bust and High Growth Levers, about how individuals and corporations use Compassionate Capitalism to create wealth and grow their business. As a nationally recognized expert on Angel Investing, Karen has written the best selling book Inside Secrets to Angel Investing as a step by step guide for learning how to invest in private companies to bring innovation to the market, create jobs and create wealth for all those involved – Compassionate Capitalism. She believes busy executives can effectively diversify their portfolio to invest in entrepreneurs as a wealth creation strategy, and enjoy the passion and excitment of an entrepreneurial endeavor without incurring all the risk and challenges of being an entrepreneur. Mark’s company, Echelon Management International, works with both leaders of successfully growing companies who want to raise the bar as well as with companies in turnaround. Mark has worked with and interviewed many Fortune 500 CEO’s, hundreds of number one sales performers, and thousands of his client’s top customers. From this experience and insight, he discovered a corporate version of Compassionate Capitalism that is part of the pattern for success for those companies and executives.

Keywords: [“company”,”Karen”,”Investor”]
Source: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/karen-rands

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-31-2018

Compassionate Capitalist Coffee Break – Seed Stage Investors

Forget compassionate capitalism, just some fairness will do

Saving Capitalism by Robert Reich could have ended up being the usual rant against the excesses of capitalism and capitalists. His argument that large companies in collusion with regulators and government officials have exploited the free market system for massive personal gains comes with the force of his personal experience as secretary of labour in the Clinton administration, as well as reams of relevant data. Osvald Bjelland founded and runs Xynteo, an Oslo-based consulting firm that advises companies on how doing good for society can be good for their bottom lines as well. As a serial entrepreneur who sold an earlier start-up to Citibank, it does sound strange for him to be critical of the capitalist system. Finally, over the weekend, N.R. Narayana Murthy, co-founder of Infosys, one of India’s most influential entrepreneurs and a poster boy for how capitalism can spawn a thousand millionaires, led some of the company’s founders in abstaining from voting in favour of a board proposal to hike the salary of the company’s chief operating officer U.B. Pravin Rao by 35% to Rs12.5 crore. Reich is even more critical of the system that served the US and most of Western society for well over a century. Before the current round of hand-wringing against capitalism took wing, the system did deliver incredible growth to all those countries that adopted Adam Smith’s laissez faire doctrine. In a country like India where for centuries, two meals a day was the ambition of millions, today people demand a share of the wealth they are helping create for the companies they work in. The virtual defanging of unions, the unholy nexus between government and big business, and above all the limitless greed of a select few for more power, have all contributed to the prevailing angst about the existing rules of business. Now as more and more of those who may have been its biggest beneficiaries declare that it is broken, the need to fix it, is acquiring urgency. Perhaps it is too much to expect compassion from a system that is inherently Darwinian. We will settle for a fairer and more just arrangement.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”system”,”companies”]
Source: https://www.livemint.com/Opinion/K6RVjtcr1QX0DAQFvJZg6O/Forget-compassionate-capitalism-just-some-fairness-will-do.html

The Free-Market Fantasy

Instead of trying to get a handout from the government or make a quick buck on the stock market, Mackey says that companies need to roll up their sleeves and rethink how to run a business. Today, the dominant discourse governing discussion of markets, states, and companies is neoliberalism, and Mackey’s free-market business model and historical narrative fit neatly within this framework. As economic historian Karl Polanyi argued decades ago, capitalist markets are a product of state engineering, not nature. The history of industrial development in the United States, often considered the epicenter of free markets, demonstrates the political nature of markets. The history of market formation in the United States reveals an industrial structure supplied by goods and capital extracted from slave labor and facilitated through a state-sponsored, genocidal land grab. Far-reaching government legislation protected domestic markets and infant industries from external competition, and federal and state governments played a central role in the development of physical infrastructure and the creation of huge bodies of agricultural and industrial knowledge – all essential elements in the genesis of American industrial capitalism. At the same time, society’s greatest inventions and innovations of the past two hundred years – rockets to the moon, penicillin, computers, the Internet – were not bestowed upon us by lone entrepreneurs and firms operating in free markets under conditions of healthy competition. Companies produce influential innovations, but so do other institutions that operate outside the confines of the profit motive, competitive markets, and the bottom line. Designating the market as natural and the state as unnatural is a convenient fiction for those wedded to the status quo. The complexion of those markets depends on the balance of class forces at any given point in time. Free markets don’t exist and other institutions like states clearly matter. Free markets don’t exist, but maybe corporations are still the best, most sensible, way to heal the planet.

Keywords: [“Market”,”capitalism”,”Mackey”]
Source: https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/04/free-market-conscious-capitalism-government/

Even Stevens Makes Capitalism-With-a-Cause Work

Addressing nationwide food insecurity while creating a thriving restaurant business should be a Herculean task, but Michael McHenry tackles formidable projects several times a week. As the president of Even Stevens Sandwiches, McHenry exudes an unfailing optimism that’s carried the hip sandwich shop to six states with 20 locations-with many more scheduled to open in 2018. Craft sandwiches, a local vibe and a charitable cause have propelled Even Stevens to build an organization that employs hundreds and serves millions. Even Stevens opened its first location in downtown Salt Lake City in 2014 and introduced the concept of donating one sandwich for every sandwich sold. McHenry has an extensive background in the restaurant industry. He worked for 15 years in brand development, concept and operational performance before partnering with Even Stevens owner Steve Down to create the first restaurant in the industry that can correlate revenue with social impact. It took less than three years to sell and donate a million sandwiches, and by the end of 2017, Even Stevens had donated over two million sandwiches to more than 70 nonprofit organizations. The organizations place the order, often a $2,500 value, and the food is drop-shipped to the door with Even Stevens picking up the bill. Following a close second to the compassionate capitalism aspect of Even Stevens is McHenry’s enthusiasm for team development. Even Stevens donates around 100,000 sandwiches a month, and McHenry says overcoming challenges has contributed to the ongoing success of the brand. Each of the eight Even Stevens locations in Utah works with merchants from that area to provide a catalyst for the business community. McHenry says his job is to be a voice for social change, to find artisans in the food industry, to partner with nonprofits that are tackling food insecurity, and to find new neighborhoods where the sandwich shop can create a sustained impact.

Keywords: [“McHenry”,”Even”,”Stevens”]
Source: https://utahbusiness.com/even-stevens-shows-make-capitalism-cause-enterprises-work/

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 03-29-2018

A Christmas Carol Themes

The financial success that Scrooge enjoyed is precisely the goal of capitalism, but a fixation on the accumulation of wealth seduced Scrooge into seeing every aspect of life in such terms. Not only Christmas, but his fiancé, his dying friend and business partner, his reputation, his office staff, and his only living family member are all weighed against their financial cost and found unworthy. The costs of such selfishness and bitterness are not borne by Scrooge alone, however. Dickens’s portrayal of the social costs-prisons, workhouses, increased mortality, the creation of ghettos and slums, the miserable state of both wealthy and poor alike-clearly makes a case for morality and social justice on a larger scale. The world becomes a better place almost immediately following Scrooge’s conversion. The story implies that a renewed connection to humanity is the very essence of redemption. Though the Christmas setting invites a traditional Christian interpretation of Scrooge’s redemption, his change is rooted not in a commitment to deeper spirituality or orthodoxy but in an authentic connection to and investment in the lives of other human beings. While the results seem to change nothing about the social structure itself, the compassion shown by individual people changes the social relationships they share.

Keywords: [“social”,”Scrooge”,”Christmas”]
Source: https://www.enotes.com/topics/christmas-carol/themes

For Equal Rights by Sophie M. Gray

In the world of today, where you have a racist neo-nazi uprising in Europe, where Trump gets a free pass in saying racists slurs, and ISIS talks about global domination, I see history repeating itself – over and over again. I have over the years tried to understand what it is that gets millions of people to follow such a man and do horrible unthinkable things. I wanted to understand how it was possible for this one man to convince millions to believe his own reality and perception, acting on his beliefs, and follow him blindly. I came to realise that Hitler is not the only one with this power, and this is why history keeps repeating itself. In all cases they use fear to recruit more into their movement and convince them about the cause, a cause they would die and kill for. Fear is a powerful emotion, and from there comes hate. A lot of this fear comes from lack of knowledge, the fear of the unknown. Leaders that preach war and hate use fear to reach their goals and start movements. With fear they make people believe their cause, and with fear they win. Our strongest tool against these movements is knowledge and critical thinking. That is how we stop governments cheating us, companies abusing us, global wars and bullies. We have therefore the obligation to each other to spread knowledge – not fear.

Keywords: [“fear”,”over”,”knowledge”]
Source: https://forequalrights.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

discordion {Artist Ian Pritchard}

Here’s the list of companies that took advantage of taxpayer-funded workers courtesy of the DWP. Feel free to use the information in whatever way you see fit. The Tory government has been forced to reveal a vast list of firms that hoovered up free labour from benefit claimants after spending four years trying to keep it a secret. Poundstretcher, Tesco, Asda and Morrisons are among more than 500 companies, charities and councils named as having used Mandatory Work Activity. Others on the list from 2011 included payday loans firm Cash Converters, chicken diner Nando’s, WH Smith, Superdrug and DHL. More than 100,000 jobseekers were put on the hated ‘workfare’ scheme, which forced them to work 30-hour weeks unpaid for a month each or have their benefits docked. The Department for Work and Pensions mounted an astonishing and costly legal battle to keep the firms’ names a secret. The DWP stood its ground for nearly four years despite being overruled by the Information Commissioner watchdog in August 2012. The saga finally ended at the Court of Appeal on Wednesday – where a trio of top judges threw out the DWP’s argument by a 2-1 vote. Campaigners and Labour condemned the vast cost of the cover-up – in which taxpayers had to fund lawyers for both the DWP and ICO..

Keywords: [“Work”,”DWP”,”firm”]
Source: https://discordion.wordpress.com/tag/capitalism

Mental wellbeing, capitalism and fluminism. Notes.

Photo by me On social media, I read of a woman who recently experienced rejection from mental health services during a crisis of severe distress and suicidal thoughts. I know something of the absolute fear and isolation suffered during times of severe distress and suicidal thoughts. Humans are biologically social beings, yet our social foundations have been shaken to the core. Families and institutional service providers have been hammered by the pressures of a failing economic system ~ Neoliberal Capitalism. A globalised machine based on competition rides roughshod over mental wellbeing. Tensions manifest directly upon loving and supporting relationships, right across the globe. Humans are biologically responding to internal and external stimuli. The externals are largely ignored in our systems of care. Even the monetisation of nature is being forced at a pace, adopted by advocates of a growth-oriented market system dominated by corporate interests. Lives are worn down and snuffed out by competitive examinations, interviews, PIPS, job markets, mortgage payments, rents, bills, the weekly shop. I will not accept all-out competition is the god-given ‘natural state’ of human existence. We can perpetuate and proliferate positive interconnections between all living beings.

Keywords: [“human”,”system”,”market”]
Source: https://seasonalight.wordpress.com/2018/01/06/mental-wellbeing…