J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 09-28-2018

Compassionate Capitalism: A Journey to the Soul of Business eBook: Blaine Bartlett, David Meltzer: Amazon.ca: Kindle Store

Product Description Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. From our perspective, business is nothing less than a spiritual discipline, it requires the same integrity, commitment, intentionality, courage, discipline, and compassion as any other spiritual discipline. 

It’s the honoring of this value-the ennobling of this value-that is called forth when we approach business as a spiritual undertaking. About the Author Blaine Bartlett is a thought leader, author, professor, and keynote speaker. Over a career spanning almost four decades he has had the opportunity to impact nearly a million individuals and has observed firsthand what business has done as well as recognizing what it is capable of providing. Blaine works internationally and regularly speaks to businesses, universities and global conferences on the future of business and leadership. Through his work and life he embodies the position that the future of business is making the future its business. 

David Meltzer is currently the CEO at Sports 1 Marketing, a global marketing agency he co-founded with Hall of Fame Quarterback Warren Moon. As a Forbes Top Ten Keynote speaker and best-selling author Dave combines situational knowledge from his career and life journey and speaks internationally to Fortune 500 companies and top business conferences, prestigious universities, and sports seminars. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”speaks”,”Sports”]
Source: https://www.amazon.ca/Compassionate-Capitalism-Journey-Soul-Business-ebook/dp/B01GOUOWFS

How to achieve a more compassionate capitalism: look back to medieval Cambridge

Legal advances created a lively property market; cutting-edge technologies improved water management and bridge-building; commodity trade expanded; and towns grew dramatically, both in number and size. Its focus was on local infrastructure and local wellbeing. City churches were financed by local people to meet the needs of local people. Their legacy remains with us today: the most valuable real estate in a modern city is often occupied by medieval churches and hospitals. Using recently discovered documents and novel statistical techniques, we have analysed the histories of over one thousand properties in medieval Cambridge over this period. 

Using evidence from the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279 – we show how wealth accumulated by successful businesses was recycled back into the community through support for local churches and hospitals and for itinerant preachers based in the town. Town government was devolved by the king and queen to the mayor and bailiffs, and they encouraged the development of guilds, which promoted cooperation. The business centre of Cambridge shifted south as the town expanded. ‘New wealth’ replaced ‘old wealth’ as a local commercial class replaced Norman aristocrats. Local pride and religious devotion – expressed through high levels of charitable giving – helped spread the economic benefits throughout the town community. This self-sustaining system was broken in the 1340s by the Black Death, the outbreak of the Hundred Years War and the punitive levels of taxation imposed on towns thereafter. 

When prosperity returned in the Tudor period, a more ruthless form of capitalism took root, and it is this ruthless form of capitalism whose legacy remains with us today. 

Keywords: [“local”,”town”,”Hospitals”]
Source: https://ehsthelongrun.net/2017/03/27/how-to-achieve-a-more-compassionate-capitalism-look-back-to-medieval-cambridge/

One Man’s Quest To Make Medical Technology Affordable To All

One Man’s Quest To Make Medical Technology Affordable To All : Shots – Health News David Green says capitalism practiced with empathy is the right way to make health care available to the masses. The social entrepreneur is working on medical devices and services that can make a difference in the developing world. David Green is a man on a mission to drive down the cost of medical devices and health services. I caught up with Green at a company he is launching in Chicago that’s taking on the high cost of hearing aids. He’s demonstrating how to program his company’s new hearing device on a cellphone. 

He has helped create Sound World Solutions to market a new high-quality hearing device developed by his partner, Stavros Basseas. My competitive juices get flowing when I start to think about a big, $4 billion medical device company and how I’m going to beat them. The device, which we reported on yesterday, will be sold in the U.S. But the main market will be in developing countries, where it will sell for a couple hundred dollars – a fraction of the cost of high-end hearing aids. Green says his strategy is to minimize the cost of technology, production and distribution so he can push prices to the lowest possible level and force other companies to compete. 

The most notable may be a company named Aurolab in India that manufactures intraocular lenses. Through Aurolab, Green helped drive down the price of the lenses from several hundred dollars apiece to $2 now. Green has also set up eye-care programs in countries from Nepal to Kenya, created less expensive testing for people with diabetes, and helped set up social investing funds. 

Keywords: [“hear”,”Green”,”company”]
Source: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2013/07/03/198065436/one-mans-quest-to-make-health-care-accessible-and-affordable

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-06-2018

TOMS Shoes Adds Eyewear To Its One For One Business Model

After months of teasing, TOMS Shoes opened up its touring cardboard tube to reveal the next tier in it’s business model: eyewear. “In 2007 after giving away 10,000 shoes, I recognized that the one-for-one model but what I also saw in the many villages we went to was that there were many more needs that weren’t being met,” TOMS founder Blake Mycoskie told a crowd of about 200 fans, supporters and media outside the California Heritage Museum Tuesday morning. “I made a promise to myself that as soon as the business was ready we would use our model to address another need.” TOMS one-for-one model has provided more than one million shoes for people in need worldwide as a result of more than one million pairs sold via the TOMS website and retail partners including Nordstrom, where TOMS is the number-one selling shoe, reports The LA Times. With eyewear, TOMS believes it can have an immediate impact for a solvable issue. TOMS Eyewear is available for purchase starting today.

Keywords: [“TOMS”,”model”,”shoe”]
Source: https://globalgrind.cassiuslife.com/1701394/toms-shoes…

Compassionate Capitalism

Blaine Bartlett joins Ivan Misner to discuss his International Best Selling book, “Compassionate Capitalism: Journey to the Soul of Business”. Pay attention to the soul of your business or you might miss incredible opportunities. Business is the most pervasive and influential force on the planet today. Its activities transcend national and international borders. The net of this is that business, as a prevalent and important force, has a moral responsibility to guide, enhance, value, and nourish the existence of all that it encounters. In the world today, the absolute opposite of this occurs. Business today seldom assesses the efficacy of its activities through the lens of anything but profit. Traditional capitalism forgets an important variable, that of happiness. The true purpose of business is to uplift the experience of existing. Compassionate capitalism is an economic system meant to make a lot of money, help a lot of people, and have a lot of fun.

Keywords: [“Business”,”lot”,”activities”]
Source: https://ivanmisner.com/compassionate-capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism – Books Pics – Download new books and magazines every day!

A plan that has made him one of America’s richest men, and that has made Amway one of the great corporate success stories of our time. Compassionate Capitalism spells out clearly and eloquently the guiding principles and concrete steps to making your life and your world better. Rich DeVos shows how your energy, your ambition, and your spirit of enterprise can travel together down a path in which the spirit of capitalism and moral values inextricably merge. Interweaving his own amazing story with vivid personal histories of men and women around the world, Rich DeVos illustrates both how success is achieved and what it truly means. He demonstrates that compassionate capitalism is the only solution to the most crucial issues of our time, and to the many other challenges that face us in the closing decade of this century and in the beginning of the next.

Keywords: [“Capitalism”,”spirit”,”how”]
Source: https://bookspics.com/ebooks/compassionate-capitalism

Promoting Compassionate Capitalism

Speaker Bill George talks about his personal views in this interesting capitalism speech. George explains that he is a believer in capitalism, and has no problem with outsourcing jobs. The idea of working with experts from all over the world excites him. George admires companies that find skilled people from other countries. He doesn’t believe in criticizing these kinds of actions in business. George says that corporations can improve rough situations in other countries, such as poverty or economic self-sufficiency, through outsourcing. George states that compassionate capitalism must include fairness, decency, transparency and honesty. George does acknowledge that capitalism can cause harm under certain circumstances. According to George, this creates the need for authentic business leaders, rather than people who are only motivated by money.

Keywords: [“George”,”capitalism”,”business”]
Source: https://www.trendhunter.com/keynote/capitalism-speech

National Network of Angel Investors

All of these terms are buzz words for a simple concept. Investing in a small business when they are still private and have tremendous growth potential, so that the value of that stock creates a multiple on your money when they get sold or go public. The National Network of Angel Investors is the 4th generation of an angel investor group started in 1994, the Network of Business Acquirers and Investors. It is made up of angel groups that are forming all over the United States for a singular purpose – to have a direct impact on growing their wealth while increasing the jobs in the market and funding innovation. When you are ready to start angel investing, you’ll gain exclusive access to screened and vetted entrepreneurial endeavors with tremendous potential.

Keywords: [“Angel”,”investor”,”start”]
Source: http://nationalnetworkofangelinvestors.com

Health, Medicine and Natural Healing 05

Vegetable share to the CSA dairy farming family that provides me with. The milk and cream that I drive an hour out of town to obtain. Are making an effort to provide wholesome products to the people that. What I see is that there are those who may be selling raw milk as a. hobby level income. They have, but with only one milking cow, they are only making about. 800 a month, before expenses and labor for the milk they sell. Are providing a very modest partial income, while supplying a handful. I know all of the families buy their milk travel some 50-100 miles. This is the small town mentality that I like so much. Of the reasons why Oregon drew me – the friendly, small town outlook.

Keywords: [“milk”,”income”,”town”]
Source: https://www.remedyspot.com/content/topic/3555445-compassionate…

J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 02-02-2018

How to achieve a more compassionate capitalism: look back to medieval Cambridge

Legal advances created a lively property market; cutting-edge technologies improved water management and bridge-building; commodity trade expanded; and towns grew dramatically, both in number and size. Its focus was on local infrastructure and local wellbeing. City churches were financed by local people to meet the needs of local people. Their legacy remains with us today: the most valuable real estate in a modern city is often occupied by medieval churches and hospitals. Using recently discovered documents and novel statistical techniques, we have analysed the histories of over one thousand properties in medieval Cambridge over this period. Using evidence from the so-called ‘Second Domesday’ – the Hundred Rolls of 1279 – we show how wealth accumulated by successful businesses was recycled back into the community through support for local churches and hospitals and for itinerant preachers based in the town. Town government was devolved by the king and queen to the mayor and bailiffs, and they encouraged the development of guilds, which promoted cooperation. The business centre of Cambridge shifted south as the town expanded. ‘New wealth’ replaced ‘old wealth’ as a local commercial class replaced Norman aristocrats. Local pride and religious devotion – expressed through high levels of charitable giving – helped spread the economic benefits throughout the town community. This self-sustaining system was broken in the 1340s by the Black Death, the outbreak of the Hundred Years War and the punitive levels of taxation imposed on towns thereafter. When prosperity returned in the Tudor period, a more ruthless form of capitalism took root, and it is this ruthless form of capitalism whose legacy remains with us today.

Keywords: [“local”,”town”,”capitalism”]
Source: https://ehsthelongrun.net/2017/03/27/how-to-achieve-a-more…

Compassionate Capitalism

Whenever Jan Stravers came home from the mission field, she brought crafts made by the Philipino women she worked with to sell to the churches she visited. The crafts were from family businesses that the Christian Reformed Church missionary and her husband had helped to start, and her supporting churches were among their main clients. “When we would go on home service and speak to churches, I would bring baskets and wall hangings and knit things that the ladies made,” she says. “I did really well at selling because I told them I know the people who made this-and it’s keeping their families alive.” In the 10 years that the Straverses worked as missionaries in the Philippines, they saw how small businesses can provide food, education, clothing, and a hope for the future to the poor in developing countries. After retiring from the mission field 10 years ago, Jan Stravers jumped at the chance to run International Arts and Gifts, a South Holland, Illinois, store selling handmade products made by artisans in the developing world. Slowly, the idea has been catching on among Christians that fair trade is a unique way of supporting missions and providing jobs to the world’s poor. Fair trade is a rapidly growing industry where companies like the Mennonite-run Ten Thousand Villages work directly with artisans in the developing world, offering better prices for handmade arts, crafts, and clothing. To be certified by the Fair Trade Federation, workers must earn enough to support their families, pay for education, and food. Fair-trade products must also be environmentally friendly and created under safe conditions, and the Western stores must commit to building long-term relationships with the workers.

Keywords: [“work”,”made”,”Church”]
Source: http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/novemberweb-only/11-10-31.0.html

Could Capitalism Actually Breed Compassion?

We benefit from the compassion of capitalism and we must help others achieve the same blessings. Google defines compassion as “Sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.” How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. We must be able to have sympathy for and identify with the sufferings of others in order to solve problems and serve others. Sympathy and concern for others form the bedrock of free-market exchange. Entrepreneurs play a vital role in identifying the misfortunes of others, putting themselves in others’ shoes, to really experience what they are going through. In a free society, men like Henry Turkel can take their natural sympathies toward others and aid them in their misfortune. Through his profession, he had many occasions to understand the needs of infants and others who are incapacitated and cannot feed themselves. If not for Dr. Turkel’s sympathy, understanding of suffering, and the incentives to do something about it, my Bailey Grace may not be where she is today. This type of innovation, Turkel’s invention, is encouraged when one lives in a capitalist system, which can breed compassion even among the greedy and selfish. It does encourage ordinary people to unleash their God-given creativity to identify the sufferings of others and eliminate them.

Keywords: [“other”,”Turkel”,”suffering”]
Source: https://tifwe.org/could-capitalism-actually-breed-compassion