J.R.’s Zaphne Blog News for 09-26-2018

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs, Compassionate Capitalism and Local Community Publications

Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc. Maria Peck, previously the director of the ACE Women’s Center, will lead one of ACE’s biggest projects slated to begin this year. Peck’s focus will be on providing access to commercial loans of $50,000 and greater and being visible in the Hispanic community by giving presentations and collaborating with other organizations. Peck started working at ACE as a microlender after working with ACCION USA, owning her own business, and gaining more than 15 years of sales and marketing experience in Atlanta and New York. About Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs Inc.ACE is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and CDFI loan fund that provides loans and business consulting services to help borrowers throughout Metro Atlanta and North Georgia create and grow stable, sustainable businesses that generate jobs. 

Founded in 1999, ACE has loaned more than $39 million to about 725 entrepreneurs, which has created or saved more than 6,200 jobs in Georgia. You don’t have to be a successful entrepreneur to create generational wealth if you can learn how to invest in those companies that have the potential to be the next big thing, according to Karen. Karen has been described by some as a dominant force in the entrepreneur and investor markets with her blog, published articles, frequent speaking engagements, and her Compassionate Capitalist radio show. She has been a frequent speaker and mentor within numerous Small Business and Economic Development initiatives and was the recipient of the Advocate of the Year award in 2016 at the Flight to Freedom Summit in San Ramon, California, for her work to promote Compassionate Capitalism. Karen left the corporate world over a decade ago, having been involved with many product launches, to pursue her passion for seeing innovation funded and to help the entrepreneur and investor community she served create thriving businesses. 

Karen immersed herself in the world of angel investing, first as the protégé to the founder of the Network of Business Angels. The power of microtargeting to a businesses exact demographic by supporting their local community publication. The power of content branding and the opportunity to be the only business in their industry to be allowed to submit content for the duration of their sponsorship. 

Keywords: [“Business”,”entrepreneur”,”ACE”]
Source: https://probusinesschannelusa.com/buckhead-business-show-access-to-capital-for-entrepreneurs-compassionate-capitalism-and-local-community-publications/

Kony 2012: clueless compassionate capitalism

Equally, the Invisible Children organisation, credited with the YouTube video entitled ‘Kony 2012’ cannot be taken lightly. Invisible Children claim the money raised would be used for positive construction work and projects in Northern Uganda, where Kony’s rebels operate, despite having raised US$8.6 million and used only 32 percent of that money for services in Northern Uganda in 2011. As their record has shown, money is the central nerve in the Kony 2012 project, a project that brings to bear some of the murky operations among charity organisations that wail for the downtrodden as they wipe their crocodile tears with the millions of dollars ostensibly raised to help Africans. As glossy and superficial as it is, with respect to the real problems in Uganda, the Kony 2012 film has caught the attention of millions. After having sent heavy contingents to root out al-Shabab, accepting an American military presence in Uganda to deal with the Kony affair does not augur well for Museveni, especially as a lot of Ugandans view the al-Shabab threat as a clear and present danger following the World Cup bombings in 2010 in Kampala, the capital. 

In the meantime, a coterie of Hollywood stars have joined the fray and are calling on all and sundry to make Kony 2012 famous in order to make Kony, the man, more infamous. Whilst such an oversimplification of the Kony dilemma and, for that matter, the Ugandan canker has helped the Invisible Children group to pander to sentiments and raise a lot of money, rooting out the Kony quagmire remains a Ugandan political affair. ICC’s decision to indict Kony and not the Ugandan army smacks of a lack of objectivity or fairness. In neighbouring, recently, independent South Sudan, where Kony and his men also hover, petrol and land have ignited massive international interest. So while the Invisible Children group’s call, for American intervention and all out support to the Museveni regime- by demonising a rather weakened Kony and LRA, may come as a diversionary relief for the everlasting government, it is far from being the biggest concern for Ugandans. 

The regional political dynamics cannot be separated from any international decision to root out Kony. Big salaries for them and little help to the millions of Kony’s victims in need of justice and respite. 

Keywords: [“Kony”,”Uganda”,”Ugandan”]
Source: http://www.theafricareport.com/Columns/kony-2012-clueless-compassionate-capitalism.html

Compassionate capitalism – The Denver Post

Political theorist Benjamin R. Barber should have considered hiring CNN’s Lou Dobbs as his publicist. Barber shares Dobbs’ zealousness for a return to a more gentle and compassionate capitalism, one that remains committed to mainstream values such as work and investment saving and learning to defer our own gratification for future generations. Advertisers spent less than $100 million trying to attract youths in 1990, and by 2000 had increased their advertising budget for teenagers to more than $2 billion. American kids alone spend more than $169 million a year and marketers see vast opportunities in India and China where a larger percentage of the population is under 20. 

Barber points out that educational and government institutions, which once served as a balancing forces to rampant consumerism, have simply joined the fray, leasing their classrooms and cafeterias and football stadiums to the highest bidders without regard for quality or integrity of product. Barber is not just some modern-day Benjamin Franklin lecturing us on impulse control. This accomplished author is worried that the annihilation of the town square for the suburban mall, coupled with the invasion of technologies like cellphones and video games, have replaced civilized public discourse and the responsibilities that accompany good citizenship. We remain infantilized and powerless over the more important decisions in our lives. He is an advocate for change by boycott, government pressure and encouraging corporations to embrace more wholesome business practices that look beyond profit. 

He remains insistent on staying on his message, and often seems to miss big chunks of the larger picture that may seem obvious to many readers. In more than 300 pages, he never once considers the dramatic effect of the women’s movement and the role it may have played in spurring reckless consumerism. Elaine Margolin is a freelance book reviewer and essayist in Hewlett, N.Y.. 

Keywords: [“Barber”,”more”,”market”]
Source: https://www.denverpost.com/2007/03/15/compassionate-capitalism/